171 Exterior House Wood Siding Material Beach House Design Photos And Ideas

The new cedar will age naturally, gaining a silver patina over time. The garage was refaced with stucco.
Some windows that were salvageable were kept, while others were replaced with new Jeld-Wen units that Jocie liked better for their size, shape, or function. At the corner of the sunroom, for example, an angular corner window looks much cleaner than the two units that had been there before.
The architect streamlined the exterior by replacing the shingles with tongue-and-groove Eastern white cedar boards, grown and milled in Maine.
Cutouts at the roofline demarcate the decks.
The design team treated the cedar siding with a product to give it a silvery patina that suited the neighborhood context, and anodized aluminum windows and doors match the standing-seam roof. “The design captures the spirit of this eclectic and evolving neighborhood, exhibiting both contemporary clean and straight lines but also a gable roof and cedar siding reminiscent of a traditional cottage feeling and material—something to reclaim the beachy character of the neighborhood,” says Saez Pedraja.
The front courtyard extends the living space off the kitchen, and connects the home to the neighborhood.
Saez Pedraja Architecture designed a two-bedroom, 1,600-square-foot home on a narrow city lot in the Ocean Park neighborhood of Santa Monica.
“An angled entry clad in white brick addresses the angle of the street and provides a place to pause before entering into the home,” says the firm.
This neighborhood in Whitefish, Montana used to be the grounds of a summer camp. “This was the last lot that had one of those original buildings, and it was the check-in office, which had been converted to a triplex,” says George. The clients own a custom snowboard and wakeboard company, and they wanted to “keep that camper, tree house–type feel with the massing” of the new house.
The front and sides of the home feature a wide board-and-batten larch cladding to add depth and allow for a variation of shadows throughout the day.
Siberian larch is the primary facade material. It's finished with a silicon-based protective treatment to allow the wood to weather more evenly.
Sundberg designed the home as a simple box so it would "subordinate itself" to the sandy landscape of birch trees and sea grasses.
Swedish architect Johan Sundberg designed this three-bedroom home in the southern Skåne region for a family of four. The parents grew up in the area, but they now live in Boston.
After finding paradise on a Hawaiian papaya farm, filmmaker Jess Bianchi and jewelry designer Malia Grace Mau tapped San Francisco artist Jay Nelson to design and build their dream home in just five weeks. Located just one block from the beach, the home takes inspiration from laid-back surf shacks and is mainly built with reclaimed wood.
A generously-sized, comfortable deck lines the water side of the cabin.
The “River Cabaan” is just steps away from the Wilson River and a 80-minute drive from Portland, Oregon.
Landscaping from Piazza Horticultural surrounds relaxed outdoor hangout spots.
A private outdoor shower is located at ground level, for easy access from the beach.
The team relocated the staircase so it doesn’t break up the facade.
Clapboard siding was swapped out for narrow horizontal strips of Meranti wood, and the garage now has barn-style swing doors that fit into the facade.
The bay window was squared off, and the cupola was rebuilt so that the scale works better with the massing of the building.
Oasis Tiny House, clad in teal-painted plywood and a metal roof that's pitched in the front and curved in the rear, was designed and built by Ellie and Dan Madsen of Paradise Tiny Homes in Keaau, Hawaii.
The Portage Bay Residence is a streamlined home that enjoys lake views and total privacy. The garage melds into the industrial, flat exterior, which resembles maritime sheds found throughout the area.
Making maximum use of a tight footprint, architect Robert Sweet designed a two-story home in Hermosa Beach that provides plenty of flexible indoor/outdoor space for residents Anton and Mardi Watts and their children.
Nestled on a crescent-shaped surf beach on South Island’s Banks Peninsula sits a deceptively simple beach house. Scrubby Bay is a rustic retreat flush with modern luxuries and breathtaking scenery at every turn.
Accessible via helicopter or a 40-minute 4x4 ride overtop clifftop farm tracks, Scrubby Bay offers a remote slice of paradise on a working coastal farm.
Perched quietly on the dunes of New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula, Hut on Sleds serves as a small, sustainable beach retreat for a family of five.
McCrae House 1 & 2
A beach house in the coastal Chilean town of Punta de Lobos.
In the L-shaped home, one wing houses the public rooms—living, dining, and kitchen—and the other the bedrooms, with the master on the curved end opposite the living room.
The southern side uses glass for solar gain, as Edwards Anker designed the home using Passive House principles.
Edwards Anker clad the home in cedar shingles in a nod to the local context, as many traditional homes on Long Island use the material. "Because it's such an old craft, and cedar shingles have been around in Long Island for hundreds of years, they've developed technologies for double curving these shingles for a lot of curved shapes," says Edwards Anker.
The site’s views face south and the neighbors are to the north, so Edwards Anker positioned the thick, curved walls of the house on the northern side for privacy, while the glass planes capture the setting and ocean breezes. "It’s a very lucky orientation," says Edwards Anker. The house gains its name—Cocoon—from the curved walls.
An aerial view of Martha’s Vineyard Retreat shows its idyllic location adjacent to the beach; the manicured lawn gives way to a forested area that leads to sandy paths down to the shoreline.
Approached from the driveway, the home is accessed along a stone path that turns into a series of wide, wooden steps. The home's angular roofline is a dramatic form against the natural backdrop, but the wood cladding connects it to the site.
At night, the lap pool glistens in the light from the master suite; an outdoor shower is conveniently located off the pool.
While the view from the driveway presents the home as mostly solid with a central glazed void connecting the two volumes, when approached from the beach, the home appears much more open, with an outdoor covered porch and glazed walls.
"The hut is a series of simple design moves," says the firm. "The form is reminiscent of a surf lifesaving or observation tower."
The home was built in 1980, Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects renovated the project in 2013.
The 1,600-square-foot lake home has three bedrooms and two baths, and was built for a family of three. The narrow lot has views of the water on both sides, so the firm placed the living areas on the upper floor to take advantage of this, and positioned a screened-in porch (seen on the left) to mediate between the interior and exterior.
A peek at the rooftop terrace. Here, rainwater is collected for the gravity tanks behind.
"A small volume at the rear is clad in contrasting 'flat sheet,' a cheap building material found in many traditional holiday homes," explains the firm.
The rough macrocarpa cladding helps blend the home into its surrounding landscape, while also protecting it from its ever-changing environment.
Guarding against coastal erosion, the 430-square-foot retreat rests on two thick wooden sleds which allow the structure to be readily relocated when needed.
East Lake House, designed by Robert Young Architects, features two structures to capture sunshine and breezes from all angles.
The cedar shingles—common to local buildings—are scaled up to the size of the boards to cover the roof and sidewalls of Georgica Cove.
Set among fields along the south facing coast of Long Island and within a short walk to the ocean, this Hamptons residence is a quiet refuge for a growing family and offers extraordinary views of the surrounding landscape. The volume of the house is a two-story wood, steel, and glass structure; transparent walls provide delicacy to the house. Louvered screens and deep overhangs shield the interior spaces from summer sun and allow warm winter light to dip below the roofline.
Nestled at the end of a private cul-de-sac on nearly an acre of pristine waterfront property in Sagaponack, New York, this distinctive, contemporary retreat from the renowned architectural firm Bates Masi + Architects makes a dramatic modern statement. Juxtaposing elegant, Alaskan cedar siding with broad expanses of glass, the home exudes an effortless and seamless flow between its indoor and outdoor spaces.
Looking North into the Dining Room
To take in views of Victoria’s coastline from all directions, Austin Maynard Architects crafted a bach-inspired beach house using a circular, corridor-free design and full-height glazing. Exposed trusses and a simple material palette keep focus on the outdoors, while rooftop solar panels and a rainwater harvesting system help the dwelling reduce site impact.
Fed up with flashy, environmentally insensitive beach homes, architect Gerald Parsonson and his wife, Kate, designed a humble hideaway nestled behind sand dunes along the New Zealand coastline. Crafted in the image of a modest Kiwi bach, their 1,670-square-foot retreat consists of a group of small buildings clad in black-stained pine weatherboards and fiber-cement sheets.
Front facade facing West at dusk
Front facade facing West at dusk
View through North Courtyard (looking South)
Looking West towards Lake Michigan
Wild bush, sand dunes, and scrub surrounds the circular home. The architects were careful to minimize the building impact on the fragile landscape.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.