552 Exterior House Glass Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A group of friends, led by architect Cristián Izquierdo, designed and developed a five-unit complex for their own families in Santiago, Chile. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">So many neighbors have stopped at the steel-slatted fence to chat about the architecture that a local radio station invited Cristián to discuss the design process on air</span><span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">. </span>
The back of the property has a relatively private feel for a downtown location. The living room opens out to the garden through two glazed walls, while the trellis cladding of the mudroom echoes the screens at the front of the home.
The clients had long owned the property in Mapleton Hill, and they were looking to build their dream “forever” home in which to raise their family. The public-facing side of the home is historically appropriate, with gables, dormers, a porch, and double-hung windows. While these features are traditional in many senses, the clean, minimalist detailing signals contemporary construction. Timber screens and lattices add a texture and translucency to the archetypal forms.
Organic lines mimicking those in nature can be soothing. Architect Tono Mirai, known for his "earth architecture," was inspired by the lush context for the design of this holiday home in Nagano, Japan.
The exterior of the home features warm blackbutt timber cladding and crisp black metalwork. Each level of the home opens out to a deck or balcony, and the curved white balustrade outside the main bedroom is a contemporary take on the original architecture.
Casa Parasito effortlessly provides accommodations for two people in a cleverly unique location: the rooftop of a city building in San Juan, Ecuador. El Sindicato Arquitectura wanted to not only provide a home, but also contribute positively to the densification challenge that the city’s inhabitants face. The design concept hinges on an A-frame facade. Within, an interior layout is marked by a rectangular core—also the main social/living space—from which all other utilitarian spaces, such as the kitchen, dining area, bathroom, bed, work area, and storage are accessed.
Arnott is no stranger to designing with sustainability in mind. His firm, Stark Architecture, won the "ice box challenge," an architecture competition calling on participants to build a small container with the best passive insulation.
Lexi’s career as a professional big mountain freeskier has taken her all over the world, and Trinity Passive in the woods of Revelstoke is full of reminders of her globe-trotting lifestyle. "It’s a cumulation of all of my life experiences coming together," she says.
The front fence is made from sandblasted stainless-steel rods coated in a protective penetrating sealer. The fence is cantilevered out from a concrete beam below the garden, and the gate retracts into an underground pit. “It’s the first of its type in Australia,” says architect Tony Vella. “It was a work of precision to have these thin rods slide down into the ground through 30mm holes.”
The home incorporates a number of sustainable features. Glass walls are protected by concrete eave overhangs and automated external sun blinds. In addition, the heavily insulated walls, floors, and ceiling (with roof garden layers) add to the efficient energy performance of the home.
The home is located across from one of Melbourne’s bay beaches, and it needed to easily accommodate the family’s regular beach visits. “From morning swims to summer days on the beach, the home is intrinsically connected to the sun, water, and sand,” says architect Tony Vella.
The home was built by the same carpenter who built the original bunkie on the site in the late 1980s. “He was in his early twenties back then, and now he’s nearly retired,” reveals architect Tom Knezic. “He does all the water access cottage builds there, because he’s just on the other side of the channel.” An external stair leads from the front, ground floor deck up to the deck overlooking the water.
The entrance to the home is on the ground floor. It’s accessed from a large timber deck, which is separated from a secondary deck by a landscaped gravel area that marks the entry.
“One of the most interesting parts of the project was the foundation, as we used ground screws,” says architect Tom Knezic. “I’ve never done a foundation like this, but it’s really neat because you just screw into the ground, weld the beam on top, and you’ve got a foundation in two days. It’s a very light footprint, as we didn't have to do any blasting or chipping. We had to remove some trees to fit the cottage in, but we tried to keep as many as possible around the building—by using ground screws, you’re not damaging the roots of adjacent trees.”
The site is full of forest and Canadian Shield rock—including a large rock outcrop along the lake that rises up to the height of the second floor.
“It’s only an hour and a half from the north edge of Toronto,” says Knezic. “But, because it’s water access only, it feels like you’re far away from everything—and you have a real sense of isolation.”
The windows and doors feature an extruded aluminum-clad exterior that is finished with a durable 70% PVDF fluoropolymer coating in a Rustic color. The look is contrasted by light-colored stone covering the poolside patio.
“My parents tell me they love the home every time they wake up,” says architect Ryan Bollom.
The home sits over a single level on the site and has a long, linear form that extends landscape views to the horizon. It is aligned to frame both the sunrise and the sunset.
“We always comb through work we really like for general inspiration when starting a project, but usually there isn’t one project we draw from,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “I’d consider The Barak House, designed by R&Sie in 2003, a more direct precedent for this home. Formally and conceptually it’s very different, but its core idea is a flexible wrapper over a more rigid home construction.”
The design concept is based around an interior space protected by an outer wrapper. The facade is a cement stucco, and the exterior roof structure is supported by durable cedar timbers with a basic Galvalume metal roof over a TPO flat roof. “We tried to use standard materials and finishes to minimize costs,” reveals architect Ryan Bollom.
The ground floor projects out from the slope and sits over the top of the concrete foundations, in which a wine cellar—accessed through a hatch in the hallway floor—is located.
The sharply angled roof balances the fragmented form of the home at the front. “We called the roof the ‘shark’s fin roof’ when we were designing it,” says Craig. “It offers a formal counterpoint to the mass of the upstairs, but uses a sharp angle to create a dynamic form as the building goes down the site.”
The home is made of 42 unique cross-laminated timber panels. The smallest panel is 450 millimeters x 1500 millimeters, and the largest panel is the entire southern wall—14.4 meters x 2.3 meters. The cantilevered ground floor at the rear of the home was made possible by the strength of these panels.
There is a play between really earthy, natural materials—which are seen in some of the cladding, tiles, and concrete work—and a very sleek, black metal aesthetic. “I have a lot of experience in commercial architecture, so I’m not scared of using more commercial, industrial materials on a residential building,” says Craig.
The Douglas fir cladding is from Abodo, and the home is the first project in New Zealand to use iron vitriol to treat timber cladding. The innovative finishing option enhances the natural qualities of the band-sawn timber, creating a striking contrast with the metal cladding.
The house fronts the street with the large top story and a sharply angled roof that defines the staircase, creating a striking form—especially at night, when it is lit up from within.
The two wings are connected by the courtyard, and a dining and living space that opens to the street. Privacy is provided by a large, three-meter-wide sliding panel. "In the mornings, we open the panel up to allow our living space to engage directly with the street—think the Dutch Calvinist tradition of opening one’s home to the public gaze," says Joe. "We have met many neighbors as a result, and it is a powerful device connecting public and private realms and enabling community. In the evening before bed, we shut it down."
The house has two distinct wings—the 1885 original "front" and the contemporary "rear." The front part of the home has been restored to the original 1885 floor plan, while the rear of the home was demolished and replaced with a new build that contains the garage, bathroom, and storage on the ground floor, and the boys’ bedrooms on the upper floor.
The glazed entry is on the southern side of the building, and it’s accessed via a loose court. From this position, you can see the distinction between the two sheds. The home is accessed via a small timber walkway that leads to a brass door.
The verandas provide a threshold between the internal and external spaces. “They soften the abrupt change and mediate the relationship between inside and out,” says architect Ben Shields.
The asphalt shingles that clad the exterior curve into the window openings, and an awning over the entrance appears to peel away from the facade. These details create the appearance of a skin wrapped around the entire building. The rammed earth walls are combined with seven-inch-thick wool insulation for thermal comfort.
The window and door frames are mainly crafted from cedar. They sit within the curved shell, which has deep eaves that protect the interior from the sun and reference traditional Japanese architecture.
The home is elevated about four feet above the ground to avoid moisture from the forest floor. The entire ground-floor living space opens up to a timber deck through sliding glass doors.
The home’s entrance is a timber door set into the “shell.” This leads into the heart of the ground-floor living space, which opens out to a timber deck.
The clients requested “architecture that is unusual, beautiful, and does not make you feel old in time.” Over the years, the timber and earth used to construct the home will develop a rich patina.
The shell is closed to the west and north elevations and open to the east and south elevations—an arrangement that responds to the location and orientation of the house in the forest.
Located in Providence, Rhode Island, the American Woolens Dye house is a brick and timber structure that was originally built in 1880. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and it served as a textile mill before a thoughtful and extensive renovation transformed the property into a gorgeous live/work space.
Both the main house and the cabins were designed to bring the outside in, celebrating a connection with the surrounding forest. The expansive deck on the main house almost doubles the usable square footage, blurring the barrier between the interior and exterior.
The clients—Dr. Merriss Waters, a veterinarian, and Dr. Andrew Fleming, a clinical child psychologist—had a lifelong dream to live in a pristine, pastoral setting in the Pacific Northwest. “They live an active lifestyle and enjoy exploring the islands,” says architect Taylor Bode. “Their hobbies include mountain biking, trail running, farming, and cooking for friends and family.”  In addition to an event space in an existing barn and cabin rentals, Saltwater Farm is home to productive gardens and a variety of animals.
Saltwater Farm is located just outside the small town of Friday Harbor, which has a population of less than 2,500. “San Juan Island has a beautiful valley populated with farms, and it’s supported by a tourism- and agriculture-driven economy,” says designer Taylor Bode. “It was seen by Andrew and Merriss as the perfect place to bring their farm vision to life.”
This house’s success lies in it being true in a number of ways – to architectonic and material expression, to site and to the occupants’ ways of life.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
An enclosed porch with a fireplace sits between the living wing and the services wing, providing a pivotal point from which the home fans out.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
Architects Melissa and Jacob Brillhart wanted a home that took advantage of a lush lot and minimized any impact on the landscape. Drawing on principles of tropical modernism and the dogtrot model, the couple designed and built a simple, practical structure that is rich in cultural meaning. "There is something to be said for living in a glass house totally surrounded by nature," says Melissa. "I can't put my finger on it, but it has an impact on how I feel. It just isn’t the same experience as living in a house with traditional punched openings."
Tapped by art collectors to design an inspirational residence in rural Montana, Jackson Hole–based Carney Logan Burke Architects crafted a modern house that frames the property’s extraordinary landscape views.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.