161 Exterior House Building Type Brick Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

Brammy and Kyprianou hardly touched the front of their house, an 1880 sandstone and brick Victorian with galvanized iron ornamentation.
A guest room and office wing were added to the front of the house. This left the living room roof in tact – a key feature of the original design, and created a front courtyard that define the entry sequence as a unique experience.
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.
An IKEA PS Vågö chair sits on a small treated-pine deck off the master bedroom.
Wynants grew up sailing, and he created the piece to suggest “a moment of togetherness...the way one might gather at the back of the boat, to talk and drink.” A side view of the house captures a glimpse of what he calls “the monolith.”
“If you want to respect the old, the contrast should be brutal. I want to be very clear what is old and what is new.” —Dirk Wynants
“There’s a threshold of planting between the outside and inside,” says architect Laura Briggs, citing the blooming boxes on the sidewalk, the rear deck, and the master-suite terrace (above the bay window).
Bernstein reconfigured the entryway to the street level; guests ascend to the main living space. Ironspot clay tile and FSC-certified cedar clads the facade.
Fiberglass composite louvers, which Rich can control from the deck, block out views from a nearby college dorm and parking garage.
“I wanted to do a house that belonged on the site,” she says.
Zoning rules lim­ited the changes Mia could make to the structure’s front facade.
During the 2004 renovation the Wilsons replaced the plywood siding with cedar, and used reclaimed brick to maintain the home’s classic appearance.
For the southeast-facing facade, which is concealed from street traffic, Tehrani opted for transparency, repositioning bricks to place a sculptural collage of protruding box windows and a glass expanse.
By setting an Amsterdam house a few feet back from the street, 31/44 Architects ensured the city’s planning department that the new construction would not block light to the surrounding structures. The gray brick facade references the building material of choice in the formerly industrial neighborhood, which has seen a residential resurgence.
Designers Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon kept many of the architectural details of the 300-year-old cow barn they turned into a second home, including its terra-cotta roof tiles. The primary structural change took place on the front facade, which they tore down and rebuilt, opening space for a traditional oeil-de-boeuf window. The door on the left opens to a workshop. In addition to designing furniture, the couple also create interiors for select clients.
Rearyard extension that preserved a 200-year old tree.
Of the facade, Maury says, “It doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb, but it’s definitely one of the cooler houses in our area.”
exterior
The solid brick facade is is broken up and certainly made more interesting by the incorporation of circular windows.
The addition of a glass wall in the center of the property further opens the interior space to the outside and allows for an additional source of natural light.
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.
The view as it appears today.
Main elevation
Eastern facade
Rear portico framing rear access to house
To provide maxizing privacy and natural light penetration for their clients, Belgium-based DMVA Architects created a frontage composed of “knitted” bricks, which bring light and air into the home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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