32 Exterior House Hipped Roofline Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The home boasts numerous outdoor spaces, many protected from unpredictable rain showers.
Interior designer Ginger Lunt revives a 1954 residence that she fell in love with as a young girl growing up in the tropical forests of Mount Tantalus.
Architect Johan Sundberg looked to Japanese architects like Kengo Kuma for inspiration for the design of a holiday home in southern Sweden. "We call it the Katsura typology, but that's probably sacrilegious," he says. The eaves of the gently sloped hipped roof extend generously in all directions, turning the deck into a covered retreat that’s part veranda, part engawa, the Japanese version of a porch.
“One of the clients’ families has a history of being heavily involved in beautiful vintage wooden boats,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The timber screen plays off that idea and introduces a very warm, natural material to face the street.” The timber screen wraps around the side window to offer added privacy from the main entrance.
The brick home had a previous addition at the front that was modified during the renovation. “The client was keen on a heavy black aesthetic and we were worried it might feel very heavy, especially as it is the community-facing element of the building,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “So, we lightened it up and made it feel a bit warmer with the timber screen.”
The house has two distinct wings—the 1885 original "front" and the contemporary "rear." The front part of the home has been restored to the original 1885 floor plan, while the rear of the home was demolished and replaced with a new build that contains the garage, bathroom, and storage on the ground floor, and the boys’ bedrooms on the upper floor.
The original home was a parson’s residence built over 150 years ago that had undergone a series of small remodels in the eighties and nineties. This new intervention retained the exterior detail at the front and updated the paint scheme.
A gravel path leads from the dining area to a bridge across the restored creek that runs along one side of the house.
A centuries-old blue oak stands near the intersection of the two wings of the house, which is clad in Alaskan yellow cedar. “We decided to split the house into two volumes to let in light and allow us to be more nimble with where we placed the structures.” Jess Field, the architect.
Says Krista, “We needed to know that whatever we built would not take away from the landscape.”
On a lot studded with old-growth oaks and redwoods and crossed by a creek, Ian and Krista Johnson asked Field Architecture to design a house that would defer to its natural surroundings.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
The home is a traditional, single-fronted Victorian terrace. The architects reinstated many of the original features that were missing from the front of the home before the renovation.
From the front, this quaint Victorian cottage appears as it always has, hugging the street and alleyway. As you approach, a quiet addition is revealed beyond.
The concrete foundation was poured on top of a rock outcropping, so that the house would feel like part of the natural features of the site.
One of the client’s goals was a low-maintenance home—so there are no gutters or skylights to clean. The angles of the exterior metal envelope allow forest debris and muck to slide off easier. “The house looks after itself in a way,” says senior designer Czarina Ray.
The firm juxtaposed a standing-seam metal envelope with thin strips of cedar on the exterior. “We're playing with the textures on the outside of the house,” says Campos, pointing out that the cedar brings a “human scale” to the industrial nature of the metal.
Sooke House 01 is located on a multiacre lot on the southern tip of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, surrounded by Douglas fir, Sitka spruce, and cedar trees. At the entry, Campos Studio split the roofline to accommodate an existing tree.
The project name, Summerhouse T (or Sommarhus T in Swedish),  speaks to both the first letter of the client's last name, as well as the T-shape of the home, which was integral to creating indoor/outdoor rooms.
From the street, the addition and light-filled living spaces remain hidden.  The charm of the traditional cottage remains visible.
australian victorian renovation, exterior
Nine shipping containers form the basis of this new multigenerational house near Denver.
The home is thought to be one of the first brick structures in the area.
“After touring the factory, we could see that the working conditions looked safe and comfortable and that the building materials would stay dry at all times and go up quickly,” he says. “Traditional construction could have exposed our framing and flooring to the elements for weeks.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.