231 Exterior House Building Type Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

“The transparency of the house is really quite wonderful,” says Grace Kim of the residence, now open to the lake view.
Of the facade, Maury says, “It doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb, but it’s definitely one of the cooler houses in our area.”
Plantings: Evans + Lighter Landscape Architecture, contractor Sandra Tomasetti, and architecture firm studioWTA collaborated to develop  a roofline without gutters above the walkway and carport. Instead, water is channeled to feed the garden. The result is a California-inspired yard with geometrically laid-out plantings rather than grass. “It’s rows of green with mulch permeating,” Maury says.
Andrew worked with
Can smarter materials and better engineering mitigate the risk of living near the sea?
In southern Brazil, a 3,390-square-foot house designed by Barbara Becker and built by Charrua Construções perches on a slope overlooking the city of Pato Branco.
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Pato Branco, Brazil
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
Designed by Italian architect Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo, this holiday villa in the Sicilian countryside is intelligently designed so it’s raw wood board louvres can be opened to create a balcony that looks out to the countryside and sea beyond, or closed to maximize interior space.
Built with a steel frame, the Frost House features panels of styrofoam between aluminum sheets for the exterior walls and styrofoam between plywood for the roof and floors. Bold, primary colors accentuate its geometric form.  
Shortly after Karen Valentine and Bob Coscarelli purchased the home in 2016, they began to unearth nuggets of information about its pedigree. Their realtor had provided a brochure that identified the prefab as designed by architect Emil Tessin for the now-defunct Alside Homes Corporation based out of Akron, Ohio, which had held a patent for the structure’s aluminum paneling. Their new neighbors provided a stack of Alside Homes sales materials, floor plans of various models, and even a script that had been written for salespeople during home tours. They determined that the Frost House had been a sales model for the company, and that Tessin had been the son of Emil Albert Tessin, the legal guardian of Florence Knoll.
North facade - the framed box
Ramirez and his partner, Sarah Mason Williams, dine at a sequoia table by Redwood Burl next to a hulking juniper tree that they asked the architects to preserve as a centerpiece of the property.
Front yard
Minimal Modern Addition

Sebastian and Tanja DiGrande's quest for natural light and open, modern design led them to Klopf Architecture in San Francisco. Working hand-in-hand with homeowner/designer Tanja DiGrande, Klopf collaborated on a modern addition to the rear of a traditional-style home. The idea was to depart from the original style completely to draw a distinction between the original house and any later additions, as well as observe a very minimal, clean, gallery-like modern style against which changing daylight, art, furniture, and of course the people provide the color and motion.

With its dark gray stuccoed walls, dark steel railing, and floor-to-ceiling windows, the exterior of the addition is at the same time an open, modern box as well as a receding volume that acts almost as a backdrop for the house, receding visually out of respect for the original home. From the interior, windows bring in nature and views from all around the lush property. They also allow views of the original house. Up on the roof deck the views magnify. The owners use a boom and crank to bring up food and drinks when entertaining!

Inside, the simple clean-lined spaces showcase the couple’s minimal, modern taste. The open bathroom epitomizes the clean, minimal style of the addition. On the exterior, steel elements bring a more industrial modern feeling to the addition from the rear.
Minimal Modern Addition

Sebastian and Tanja DiGrande's quest for natural light and open, modern design led them to Klopf Architecture in San Francisco. Working hand-in-hand with homeowner/designer Tanja DiGrande, Klopf collaborated on a modern addition to the rear of a traditional-style home. The idea was to depart from the original style completely to draw a distinction between the original house and any later additions, as well as observe a very minimal, clean, gallery-like modern style against which changing daylight, art, furniture, and of course the people provide the color and motion.

With its dark gray stuccoed walls, dark steel railing, and floor-to-ceiling windows, the exterior of the addition is at the same time an open, modern box as well as a receding volume that acts almost as a backdrop for the house, receding visually out of respect for the original home. From the interior, windows bring in nature and views from all around the lush property. They also allow views of the original house. Up on the roof deck the views magnify. The owners use a boom and crank to bring up food and drinks when entertaining!

Inside, the simple clean-lined spaces showcase the couple’s minimal, modern taste. The open bathroom epitomizes the clean, minimal style of the addition. On the exterior, steel elements bring a more industrial modern feeling to the addition from the rear.
For this rural Scottish family residence, Architect Andrew McAvoy created an earth-sheltered house with a Grace & Webb fabricated laser-cut steel balcony with artistic reed-like patterns that adds a distinctive decorative element to the facade.
Street Entrance
Main Volume
South façade
Main entrance façade
The entire interior wall opens, extending the house visually and socially into the small garden that lies between the multigenerational family’s two homes. The boys’ favorite feature is the soccer goalpost (which doubles as clothesline).
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
An enclosed courtyard, bordred by ipe, is arguably the most distinctive feature of the house that the Phil Kean Design Group created for Adriana De Azevedo, Daniel Coelho, and their two daughters in Winter Park, Florida.
exterior
A home in Krisel's Kings Point development, an 11-acre site off of the Canyon Country Club golf course that was designed in the early 1960s.
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.
Kings Point—located at the Indians Canyon Golf Resort—is home to 44 condominiums designed by Dan Palmer and William Krisel in 1968. High ceilings, ample clerestory windows, and extensive views of the Jacinto Mountains are among their defining charactertistics.
Main elevation
Eastern facade

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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