843 Exterior House Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

From the street, a discrete metallic wall features two green steel doors on either side.
“At night, the Smith House appears to float like a glass box in space.
The vertical part of the "T" contains the living and dining rooms, which are divided by a fireplace. This area also provides the most dramatic vantage point for the sweeping views.
Here is a look at the elegant entrance.
The 1,550-square-foot hillside home features a vertical T-shaped layout and houses dramatic city and ocean views.
A 2,800-square-foot rooftop solar array covers all of the home's electricity needs.
Unfinished cypress siding was chosen for its natural resiliency and durability
This home is iconic of Sugden’s work in Utah, and is a direct expression of both the Modernist movement and the Bauhaus school.
Like all of Sugden’s work, the building frame is entirely made of A36 steel that is joined exclusively with moment-resisting welded connections, and rests on an exposed, reinforced concrete foundation.
Fortunately, the existing structure had good bones, so Edmonds + Lee was able to maintain the dwelling's original footprint, and focus on opening up the interiors.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
The Starlight is 2,007 square feet and wraps a courtyard. It includes three bedrooms, one of which is a separate master wing.
A staff worker tends to the grass roof.
“The factory-built modules were carefully transported up winding roads and set in place without harming a single tree,” adds the firm.
The main house comprises two primary and 11 secondary modules organized into two offset bars. One volume houses the great room that is oriented for views of the valley, while the master bedroom and study located in the other volume face northern views of the canyon.
The property offers 64 acres of varied terrain, including an open meadow, manzanita thickets, and forests full of oak, madrone, Douglas fir, and ponderosa pine.
All three flat-roofed buildings are clad in weathering steel expanded metal rainscreens, while floor-to-ceiling operable glass walls bring the outdoors in.
"In contrast to their introverted loft, High Horse Ranch was designed to be outwardly focused and defined by the site, its views, and the natural landscape," says KieranTimberlake.
Each cabin was assembled from single, mostly completed modules craned into place and raised atop concrete piers. The cabins include a bedroom and bathroom, a study desk, a  covered porch and a fire pit.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
Outdoor Decks
Entry
Entry
A glimpse at the breathtaking views available from the home.
Set on the lower section of the slope, the second volume has a more modern facade, featuring concrete, steel, and glass materials.
The upper volume—where the garage, kitchen, service areas, two bathrooms, and a patio are located—is a half-submerged body of stone set within the upper section of the slope.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
Dimster pierced the roof with a glass box topping the new central stair. To the right of the entrance is the transparent buffer between the facade and the kitchen, where an old courtyard once stood. “We wanted to keep the idea of the courtyard,” says Dimster. “The frosted panels are a distinct feature of the facade.”
Exterior of Pink House from the street. The entryway is recessed to enhance the spatial notion of soild and void.
On the other side of the entry gate, the containers’ raw corrugated shells are exposed and topped with a gravel-ballasted roof that juts past the envelope to limit solar gain.
Passersby seeing its parged gray plaster facade would have no clue that the second story of Bret and Dani Stone’s home is made mostly of shipping containers. A crane stacked the units on top of the concrete-and-steel superstructure in a single day in late 2016. Architects Clay Aurell and  Josh Blumer, veterans of the medium, sourced the recycled boxes from cor10 Studios.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
Front view of the FlatPak House in Minneapolis, Minnesota. When the architect first told his wife about his idea, she said, “It’s about time you focus on a house for me!” He continues, “It’s like the old story about the cobbler whose kids have no shoes.”
Generous balconies reach back into the surrounding forest at every level.
Front facade
Living area at night time
The home frames the spectacular view of the lake
The large terrace is shaded by trees.
The property is constructed with exclusively recyclable materials and maintains a low level of energy consumption.
Sitting less than 20 feet from the water’s edge, the home enjoys a spectacular lakeside view.
The Meadowbrook house is an anomaly in downtown Phoenix, nestled in a downtrodden neighborhood amid lush oleander bushes.
The cantilevered extension appears to float above the hillside.
The courtyard is just one of many open spaces that will be highly utilized—in the non-winter months anyway. Concrete worked well with developing the language of FlatPak. The second level is a wood panel that can be clad in corrugated metal or cedar—different layers that can be plugged in like covers on your cellphone.
Jorge appreciates his efforts at twilight. The polycarbonate panels that partially clad the exterior of the structure provide a warm glow, adding life to Tijuana’s densely packed rolling hillsides
An exterior staircases rises along a courtyard-facing wall on one of the volumes, and leads up to a roof terrace that faces a mountain to the east.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.