591 Exterior House Building Type Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Outsite partnered with Batch on this Venice Beach home to offer a place where locals can shop, live, and work. But considering how much the address can do, not much was changed of its midcentury exterior.
The steel firebox situated on the central axis is a ruin from the fire and functions as a centerpiece for outdoor space.
The front door opens to a central atrium, a classic feature of Eichler homes.
The home features a classic post-and-beam flat-roof construction.
A wall of windows lines the rear of the home.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the units range from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms. The generous glazing of the living rooms are set back from the exterior cedar rainscreen, and the rest of the facade is sheathed in metal panels. The ground floor was built onsite, but the upper two floors were prefabricated offsite in a factory.
As Washington State’s first LEED Platinum Modular Home, Lane Street was completed by Greenfab with a focus on energy reduction through a combination of eco-friendly exterior materials and energy-conscious heating and cooling equipment, including a hybrid heat pump water heater and energy recovery ventilation. The home, at 1,870 square feet, consists of three bedrooms and was completed for an all-in cost of $405,000 in 2010.
The starting price for a fully built 685-square-foot, two-bedroom Cubicco model in the Miami area is just over $115,000.
Functioning as a vacation rental for tourists, entrepreneur Rick Clegg combined old shipping containers to create a four-bedroom home with an eco twist near Palm Beach, Florida. Because of the container's inherent durability, they meet Florida's stringent construction standards, and the compactness of the home, the low carbon footprint because of the use of the recycled, prefabricated containers, and the home's proximity to the Loxahatchee River, make it ideal for ecotourists.
While you’re there, make sure to try out activities or sports that take advantage of the incredible natural surroundings. You’ll be able to rent a boat, kayak, snow shoes, a bicycle, or fishing and diving equipment. You can even sign up for a group fishing trip or have a chance to see the winter lights.
The house was constructed with a wooden frame and cellulose insulation.
Like the windows, the front door is also a square.
Several square perforations of varied sizes along wooden facade serve as windows.
Gated Driveway Entry
A shiny mirror-clad shed greets guests as they approach the house.
Californian modernism informs the shape of this Minnesota residence.
The secluded site allows for a high level of transparency in the design.
The mirror-clad shed gives the property a sense of constant movement.
High, glazed walls bring in plenty of natural light.
The facade
The vi
A Corten steel sculpture designed by the plastic artist Nivaldo Tonon.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
A house by Kengo Kuma near the Great Wall of China.
The home appears as if it is carved into the mountainside, one with the trees and rock formations.
The hovered volume places minimal impact on the site, respecting the topography and natural conditions.
Large openings provide visual connections from all areas of the home, extending the livable space out into nature.
Supported on thin columns, the main volume hovers above the graveled entry, reaching out into the surroundings.
The simplicity in massing and material create a sculptural blocking of interior and exterior spaces.
Sleek staggered roof lines, copper clad with green roof tops
The steel-framed platforms are largely open to the elements.
The the warm wood siding is juxtaposed against the industrial grey steel frame of the structure.
All the modules were designed to be able to fit on the platform of a freight truck.
The terrace serves as the dining area for the home.
The terrace attaches to the main structure via a covered walkway.
These dwellings stand in contrast to the muted tones of the surrounding village.  They represent a spirit of innovation, architectural expressionism, and an advancement in urbanization.
Curtains wrap Her House like a veil, creating a feminine solution for a new facade.
The original, irregularly placed openings remain.
Large windows connect occupants to the exterior courtyard and surroundings.
The original character and detailing of the homes remain intact.  Graceful, ornament detailing of Her House contrasts to the geometric form of His House.
In front of the cave entrance is a new semi-curved canopy, to prevent the strong wind from northwestern Mongolia.
The five separate courtyards are connected via a zigzag path similar to traditional Chinese gardens creating a tranquil atmosphere.
A night view from above.
An exterior view of the International-style home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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