265 Exterior House Shingles Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Previously, the home had been "a dim, dark, clunky disaster that had been built apparently in direct opposition to light patterns and to views of the lake," says Buhler. Now, the renovated home takes proper advantage of its lakeside setting.
Nicknamed the "lake of a thousand colors" for its brilliant coloration, Kalamalka Lake was a driving inspiration behind the home’s redesign. In a playful nod to the lengthy renovation process, the remodeled house, which now embraces views of the lake, has also been dubbed the "house of a thousand alterations."
The villa as it fits into the local landscape.
One portion of the roof arches.
The roofs’ concave and convex forms are elegantly layered and integrated into the home's forested setting.
Viewed from above, the home wraps around itself and is folded around a small central courtyard. The roof sections overlap in an organic way, giving the home its name: Four Leaves.
Set on an expansive meadow and overlooking the sea, Rode House is a semicircular residence on Chiloé Island featuring a dramatic, sloping roof that extends over an interior courtyard. Pezo von Ellrichshausen is a Chilean firm known for their arresting, geometric architecture. In true form, the striking, semicircular residence boasts a roof that drops steeply to form two sharp peaks at either end.
The roof creates a dialogue with the surrounding landscape through multiple sloped planes, irregular lines, and an absence of overhangs. The home's form appears to change according to one's angle of approach.
The Vallée du Parc Residence features a complex, angular roof that echoes the form of the surrounding hills.
“Open views, rolling hills, old barns, perch fences, and wildflowers: every aspect of the site was constantly bringing back this historical fiction of rural Quebec at the beginning of the twentieth century,” explain the architects.
The 4,672-square-foot home includes six bedrooms, two family rooms, four bathrooms, and three garage spaces—primarily located on one level.
The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
The material palette consists of concrete, bleached flooring, pine plywood, and lots of matte black and white.
Four square cut-outs on one side of the roof open the interiors up towards the sky.
This stunning property features unique marble masonry—an element not found in any other Frank Lloyd Wright home.
In Michigan, this little-known Frank Lloyd Wright home nestled on 10 acres had been deliberately kept under the radar—until now.
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
The winter sun provides some passive solar heating to the south-facing back of the home.
The approach to the front door.
The 2,000-square-foot home now has four bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a guest house with a bedroom and bathroom.
Le LAD intentionally designed the asymmetric windows on this gable wall to give the impression that they've been added over time.
This stunning forest retreat in England uses prefabricated panels to minimize site impact, shorten construction time, and protect against weather.
Built for $148,500, Casa Montaña was manufactured in a Madrid factory before being assembled in a mountainous, coastal region in Northwestern Spain.
3767 Barrington Drive features a classic Eichler profile and an inviting bright orange front door.
The exterior of the new, two-story home in East Austin, Texas was designed with a minimal palette, bronze windows, and steel details in order to blend into the existing cityscape.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
A look at the lovely nature-filled backyard.
Kengo Kuma designed Suteki House to keep a low profile "under a single, beautiful, and elegant horizontal roof." The L-shaped house hugs the slope of the lot, and the expansive use of glass maintains the interior connection to the exterior on both levels.
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
The house may appear conventional at a glance, but a closer look shows how Oostenbruggen has pushed the boundaries of the traditional gabled typology. It has an asymmetrical roof, with slate shingles that extend down the eastern side to close it off completely.
Speaking to his original design, architect Saul Zaik says, “We were really just building boxes with a bunch of windows but experimenting with how you integrated indoor and outdoor spaces.” The house has seven different openings to the exterior, allowing different courtyard or patio settings for a range of outdoor activities, including seating for a gathering on the street-facing side. The Milfords hired Lilyvilla Gardens for the landscaping around the house, including variegated bluestone steps with thyme joints.
The entry is tucked behind a louvered screen, creating a winding path to the front door. The screen, composed of Alaskan Yellow Cedar, shields views from the sidewalk while still allowing interior occupants to see out, and evokes "a sense of elegance, mystery, and warmth," says the firm.
Lanefab Design/Build demolished the existing carport and replaced it with a new addition that included the new entry, dining room, family room, mud room, and garage.
The exterior of The Great Barn.
The expansive property from above.
The garage door was replaced with a new entry to the building, featuring a custom steel canopy over the front door. The door is painted Benjamin Moore Flamingo's Dream to better contrast with the black-stained, tight-knot vertical cedar siding.
The architects worked with the natural, six-foot slope of the site and built the Granny Pad into the hill to gain the needed interior height. The volume on the right is the original garage footprint, which now houses a kitchen and sitting room. The added volume on the left hosts the bedroom, as well as a bathroom beneath the loft space.
The architects expanded the building to a total of 571 square feet. The rear entry, shown here, accesses a loft space that is currently used for storage. In the future, the loft might become an office or additional sleeping quarters, depending on the homeowners' needs.
The Inlet House exterior is marked by cedar shingle wood siding and ample glazing that emphasizes the views and the feeling of living in a wildlife sanctuary.
The new homes complement the existing residential scale in this downtown Orlando neighborhood.
The exterior of the Aspire House is built of concrete blocks with a Portland cement plaster (stucco) finish.
The well-preserved midcentury home sits on a half-acre lot near the Knollwood Country Club in Granada Hills. The lot features a gorgeous outdoor space that includes a sprawling lawn, a covered patio, and a swimming pool and spa.
The outdoor space has been landscaped with synthetic turf, as well as drought-tolerant plants.
The four-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath Passive House presents a welcoming and streamlined front porch to the street. "Fortunately, the positioning of the house allowed us to provide more traditionally proportioned windows at the front on the north side, with larger, lean metal units that open views to the backyard," explain the architects.
Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
A new 50-years cedar shake roof with copper flashing was installed just last year.
The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.
Built for television and documentary film producer Kerthy Fix, The Hive is located behind the client’s main residence in East Austin.
The one-bedroom abode features a wood-and-steel frame clad in oversized cedar shakes repurposed from the roof of another home.
Gently sloping roofs reach towards the water to the west, and the mountains to the east, reacting to the scenery adjacent to it.
The home fully embraces the natural setting, reaching out and embracing the natural wonders.
The two, season-specific wings of the L-shaped plan are separated by a covered breezeway.
Since the council wouldn't allow off-street parking or a dedicated crossover, the architects created a "hidden" sliding side gate (seen open in this image) to provide vehicle access if needed.
Western Red Cedar with a clear vertical grain was paired with vertical and horizontal shiplap for the exterior siding.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.