153 Exterior House Building Type Shingles Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Flat sections of the roof are topped with photovoltaic panels.
ts asymmetric single-hip roof captures a generous interior space, and a single operable triangular window at its leeward tip creates gentle airflow, supplementing the deliberately designed cross-breezes that negate the need for air conditioning.
The home features a long, slender volume that shields the rest of the residence from the noise and movement on the adjacent street.
Gridded steel frame windows were added throughout the home to provide natural daylight to a city dwelling, unique for a London Residence of this type.
The roof was built with prefabricated wood elements.
The home is equipped with solar water heating.
The expansive property contains an extensive forest and trail system.
The home is naturally integrated into its bucolic setting.
The northern façade of the main house is set at an angle to the barn
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
Vestigial stone walls that remain throughout the property, almost echoing the home's poetic use of stone.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
A private gate fronts the entrance to Red Oak Manor.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.
The home is just steps from the beach.
The house is set within an expansive meadow.
Sharp, crescent-like peaks on the two ends of the roof
A sweeping, arc roof that slopes steeply on one side.
The 2,000-square-feet house has an enigmatic form that resembles a cylinder, cut in half along its diameter.
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
An arial view of the property clearly illustrates the five attached pods.

This by Chilean practice Pezo von Ellrichshausen Arquitectos is built with local timber, with 45 rigid frames set in a fan-shaped configuration.
The roof of this house drops steeply down the inner curve of the semi-circle.
A semi-circular house in the commune of Chonchi, in Chile’s Chiloe Archipelago.
“The stable/garage was built with two intersecting gable roof forms," Schaer says, which didn't match up with the inteiror spaces within. “In order to provide a unified, singular main space, we dropped a flat ceiling at the entrance and linked it up with the main gable visible from the street.”
“[The clients] wished for a simple and flexible space that could be reconfigured to suit the evolving needs of the family,” principal Thomas Schaer says. “Our goal was pretty simple: don’t overthink it and have fun.” Benjamin Moore’s Kendall Charcoal covers the siding, while Segovia Red adds a pop of color to the exterior doors. Two Chair_ONEs by Konstantin Grcic stand on the patio.
A couple in Evanston, Illinois, asked John Issa of Perimeter Architects to add on a two-story, 650-square-foot addition to their traditional farmhouse. The new volume is clad in composite slate siding by Inspire Roofing Products; the windows are Pella.
This renovation was designed for a young family by Glasgow-based architect Andrew McAvoy of Assembly Architecture. McAvoy followed the original U-shape of the former residence by building two new energy-efficient houses, the first of which combines the original granite building with a new extension to provide an open-plan living area and three bedrooms.
The property features not only the geodesic dome home, but also a large yard and two additional structures.
The brick exterior of the main house.
The renovated industrial compound is clad in metallic bronze-glazed bricks from Modular Clay Product, which match the neighboring Victorian terrace homes. The reflective bricks change in appearance as the sun moves through the sky, but always echo the Bronze Casements by Vale windows.
© Vojteck Ketz courtesy of Marta Nowicka & Co.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Together with a personal Hanse Haus specialist, pre-configured house designs can be adapted simply and easily in order to suit all tastes and specifications.
The existing cottage was so run down and neglected it was not livable. The new exterior follows the existing form of the structure with all new building materials for a fresh and timeless look.
Van Beek’s extra space is home to her office. She works on a Tense table by Piergiorgio and Michele Cazzaniga and Flow chairs by Jean Marie Massaud, both for MDF Italia.
At the top, the view from the roof deck reveals a patchwork of garages and yards surprisingly free of neighbors.
bank of double-hung windows in old garage
front entry door
The end gable of the house is covered in local sandstone.
The reddish tones of the sandstone are from iron oxide deposits in the local stone.
The Nook by Hall + Bednarczyk Architects
Architect Paolo Caravello of Helsinki-based practice Void created this prism-shaped house near a lake in Sysmä, Finland, with a glass-topped pyramidal roof that transformed the top level of the house into a fully glazed observatory where its owners can look out to stunning views of the nature outdoors.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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