248 Exterior House Building Type Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Dynamic rooflines create interesting forms while simultaneously opening clerestory windows perfect for letting in natural light to each studio.
The main house includes a generous amount of outdoor space, extending the living area into the surrounding forest.
Method Homes is a custom manufacturer of precision–engineered, prefabricated, modern structures. Master craftsmen create their modular homes, commercial structures, accessory dwelling units, and garages. This 4672 sq. ft.
Margarita McGrath and Scott Oliver of Noroof Architects termed the 1,650-square-foot house in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, “Pushmi-Pullyu,” in reference to the interior-exterior flow they created. Resident Jill Magid, pictured on her front steps with son Linus, is a conceptual artist; she fabricated the neon house numbers.
The bedroom pavilion is mostly hidden, thanks to a massive native California oak—part of a grove. “That’s the good thing about oaks—they keep their leaves in the winter, so you don’t have one view in the summer and another in the winter,” Suzanne says.
More native grasses set the tone near the generously sized concrete pavers leading to the entrance. “We didn’t want the planting to feel like a country cottage garden—that would have felt disconnected with the view behind it,” Trainor says.
Butterfly House, designed by Feldman Architecture for David and Suzanne Rinaldo in California’s Monterey County, is made up of three discrete structures separated by walkways. The distinct folds in the roofs are utilized for rainwater catchment.
window wall
front entry porch
modern farmhouse front door
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
R128, Sobek’s family home (featured in Dwell’s May 2003 issue), is a groundbreaking example of green design with zero energy consumption, emissions, and waste.
side view with lift and slides onto stone terrace cliff
Entrance doorway
Entrance side view surrounded by landscapes and lake
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.
“How would a kid draw a house?” architect Per Franson asked himself when designing the Olivero-Reinius family home in suburban Stockholm. The simple prefab structure’s unusual color comes from a traditional source: falu rödfärg, the historic mineral paint that gives the region’s famous barns their red color. Here, the addition of a tint created a hue that matched the house’s green Plannja roof panels.
The other facades have wood panels as well as the local red sandstone.
Drone footage of the site.
Says Kundig, “The clients are great parents and are always undertaking adventures as a mindful, deliberate way of developing memories as a family.”
This Melbourne home is made up of a series of renovated gabled structures, and the contrast of its white steel panel and western red cedar shingle cladding emphasizes its geometric forms.
From its locally quarried stone foundation to its zinc-coated copper roof, the cottage was inspired by its surroundings. “We talked a lot with our client about what the materiality would be,” says architect Karen Stonely, who, citing the organic style of Bar Harbor architect Robert Patterson, designed the structure with wood rather than drywall.
This rain storage tank is a feature to be displayed at the entrance and not hidden away, as so often is the case. Sustainable infrastructure can be beautiful.
There was insufficient wood from the original house to do the large expanse of the west side of the Barn Gallery, so additional planks were sourced from a dismantled warehouse north of LA. As the wood naturally fades it blends with the wood from the original house. Corten steel frames the roof and walls.
The siding planks are from the floor joists of the original house; cut from trees on the property in 1970. They were carefully removed from the original house in 2014 and transported down the road to a neighbor’s saw mill, where they were resawn for use as the siding you see here; they are untreated and weathering naturally to what will become a beautiful silvery patina. That’s a small carbon footprint!

Recycled steel and metal artifacts are integrated into the design, complementing the reclaimed woods. The design echoes a barn on the adjoining property, but with a decidedly contemporary flavor. Guests comment both ways…… they love the modern design and they appreciate the design maintaining the local rural feel!
The Barn Gallery faces southwest to a secluded waterfront bluff, and is surrounded by 4 acres of woodland and a private meadow.

Collection and filtration of rain water, and a focus on natural landscaping are integral parts of the Barn Gallery sustainable design philosophy. The rain garden (bottom right) functions as a natural filtration system for stormwater runoff headed to the channel below, and is one of the most talked-about features.
back yard w/ outdoor shower
The Barn Gallery faces southwest to a secluded waterfront bluff, and is surrounded by 4 acres of woodland and a private meadow.

Collection and filtration of rain water, and a focus on natural landscaping are integral parts of the Barn Gallery sustainable design philosophy.  The rain garden (bottom right) functions as a natural filtration system for stormwater runoff headed to the channel below, and is one of the most talked-about features.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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