1437 Exterior House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The renovated home respects the original period of the home, maintaining some of the original character.  From the front elevation, the contemporary refurbishments are concealed.
With a construction budget of less than $200 per square foot, architect Les Eerkes (with the mentorship of Tom Kunding) looked for ways to build the structure efficiently. He specified glulam—glued laminated timber—for the structure and spanned the skeleton with structurally insulated floor and roof panels. The structure is stationed atop a six-column foundation. "The 'six-footed' solution was balanced against a spread footing and stem wall approach," Eerkes says. "Cost analysis led us in the direction of the column footing approach because it minimized excavation and form work costs."
New zoning allowed for a zero-lot-line structure, but required a public storefront, which Carpenter uses as an art gallery.
The main living space is constructed of immense I-profiles, allowing for a full wall of glass with four large sliding doors that open to the backyard.
Michael Hughes and his University of Colorado collaborators transformed a 10-by-47-foot trailer destined for the landfill into the striking TrailerWrap “rehab” prototype.
Perforated steel panels provide a contrasting sense of roughness and lightness, which Oman played with throughout the home's design. The skin adds transparency and graphic energy to the exterior, though Oman did worry about people fixating on the tic-tac-toe element. "It's like calling a rectangular building the Tetris house," he says.
Rok Oman of OFIS Architects started the renovation of what would become Villa Criss-Cross by tackling a thorny site issue. Since it is located close to the street and perpendicular to the old Roman wall near Ljubljana's ancient fortress, zoning laws require buildings to be set four meters back from the street. By maintaining the original wall and adding steel panels, Oman grandfathered in the new structure and maintained the original orientation.
The home is defined by two types of windows: large punch openings for views onto the landscape and vertical windows everywhere else.
A guest room and office wing were added to the front of the house. This left the living room roof in tact – a key feature of the original design, and created a front courtyard that define the entry sequence as a unique experience.
Built as part of a functional farmhouse, the original building's ground floor was used to store food and animals, a situation that didn't exactly call for expansive views or large amounts of natural light. Vieira da Silva maintained a similar layout over the two-story home, with social areas on the upper floor and bedrooms on the ground floor, but opened up the lower level with large windows. "With the pre-existing stone walls we created patios, keeping a distance [between the walls] so we could have big openings, and create a close and intense relationship with the landscape and the ruin itself."
Matthew Hufft designed the house that he shares with his wife, Jesse, and their three children to sit inconspicuously among its neighbors in the Roanoke Park area of Kansas City, Missouri. The backyard and porch, which is furnished with a Saarinen Round Dining Table and Emeco Navy chairs, is a popular setting for warm-weather entertaining.
“We should be creating more energy than we need in this house,” Cranston explains. The roof’s solar array, from Schuco, contributes greatly.
For the facade, exposed to the constant salt air, the team considered everything from copper or zinc to Kynar-coated aluminum. Eventually, a sample of titanium was tacked up for six months and showed no wear. “Part of the green philosophy is not just what is cheaper; it’s what’s sustainable,” Cranston explains. “The titanium cladding was more expensive, but this is a house we plan to be in for the rest of our lives, so we wanted something that needed virtually no maintenance.”
The architects felt that a strong vertical addition would draw extra attention to the original house’s strong horizontal character. The tower itself is a reinterpretation of an A-frame from another Strenger house five doors down.
These rustic roof beams were also recovered from the barn and support a covered patio at the rear of the Bunkie.
Located about 100 miles north of Toronto, the Bunkie overlooks the Lake of Bays and is adjacent to the client’s house. This Bunkie is clad in wood reclaimed from a barn. A patio extends outwards, enabling the client to exercise outdoors when weather permits.
main elevation
exterior details: brick and wood slats
side view with lift and slides onto stone terrace cliff
Entrance doorway
Entrance side view surrounded by landscapes and lake
Resident Richard Kim, who works as the head of design at electric car company Faraday Future, tested his know-how with the creation of his own Los Angeles home, a curvilinear structure clad in Cor-Ten steel and black-stained cedar.
Tina and Matthew Ford, here with daughter Daisy, are the owners of Shade House Development, the company that designed and is building the suite of houses that comprise Row on 25th in Houston, Texas.
The series of pitched white buildings was inspired by the work of architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen. “The shell of the house is a very simple form,” says Matthew Ford, “no turns or intersecting roof sections. This allowed me to use solid but inexpensive framing and roofing crews. We are always looking for the point where simplicity and luxury meet.”
Landscape architect Tait Moring installed pavers around the structure’s perimeter and kept the tree cover intact. Photo by: Kimberly Davis
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.
Another charred wood siding residence by Fujimori, the compact Coal House has a tearoom on the second story that accessible from the exterior by a timber ladder from the interior by a secret door in the master bedroom.
Amsterdam architect Pieter Weijnen first discovered charred wood through the work of Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori. He later traveled to the Japanese island of Naoshima to observe the traditional technique. When he returned to Amsterdam, he did some DIY wood charring for sidings and ceiling panels for own passive home – House 2.0.
Inspired by a barn, which is part of the same property, the main house in Hudson Valley, New York was constructed from structural insulated panels from Vermont Timber Frames and clad in charred cedar.
With a textured skin of Shou Sugi Ban, Michigan Lake House, designed by New York firm Desai Chia Architecture in collaboration with Michigan firm Environment Architects, dramatizes the play of light and shadows as the sun moves it through the day.
This modular prefab by London practice RDA Architects in collaboration with prefab and modular builders Boutique Modern is clad in Shou Sugi Ban timber with fit-outs selected by the owner.
Oisterwijk Brouwhuis was designed by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten and its finished structure resembles an elongated barn in the forests of Oisterwijk. The pitched roof makes way for a window wall that covers one entire end of cabin. The exterior is clad in black-stained wood, which matches the wooded forest and contrasts with the snow.
West Facade
The house's simple gable form helps the house blend in with its neighbors.
Between the front and rear exteriors, over 800-square-feet of patio space extend the living areas into the outdoors. From this angle, the references to Florida cracker architecture are obvious. The sleeping quarters are connected via a central corridor and kitchen to the living space on the other end of the building, a modern interpretation of the classic dogtrot house.
Lightweight shuttered doors made of western red cedar line the outer edge of the front porch, providing privacy and protection from the weather. The wood is left unstained, so it will age naturally in a way that’s similar to the surrounding ipe wood. Just behind the shutter system, 50-feet of glass walls broken into four sets of sliding panels open to eliminate the barriers between indoor and outdoor spaces.
kitHAUS prides itself on its stylish, modern prefabs that are built on-site by a team of company employees. Their patented aluminum system takes only a few days to construct, and the homes boast superior energy efficiency, owing to insulated floors, walls, and ceilings as well as glazed doors and windows.
While sustainability, ease of construction, and affordability are priorities for most kit home companies, not all are as concerned with aesthetics. Stillwater Dwellings, which has participated in both the 2013 and 2014 Dwell on Design exhibitions, puts a distinct emphasis on natural lighting, intelligent floor plans, and high-quality craftsmanship to ensure innovative, modern designs.
An IKEA PS Vågö chair sits on a small treated-pine deck off the master bedroom.
bank of double-hung windows in old garage

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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