2592 Exterior House Design Photos And Ideas

From the street, a discrete metallic wall features two green steel doors on either side.
The deck enables easy outdoor living and dining.
The vertical part of the "T" contains the living and dining rooms, which are divided by a fireplace. This area also provides the most dramatic vantage point for the sweeping views.
Here is a look at the elegant entrance.
The 1,550-square-foot hillside home features a vertical T-shaped layout and houses dramatic city and ocean views.
The exterior of the 1853 row houses.
A 2,800-square-foot rooftop solar array covers all of the home's electricity needs.
Unfinished cypress siding was chosen for its natural resiliency and durability
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
The building’s historical façade was preserved and the the original company sign was retained.
The large, sliding doors pocket into the deep stone walls, completely opening up the living space to the outdoors.
A simple composition in form, but intelligent in detail and execution, the peaked-roof dwelling is a stunning wood- and stone-clad living space.
This home is iconic of Sugden’s work in Utah, and is a direct expression of both the Modernist movement and the Bauhaus school.
Like all of Sugden’s work, the building frame is entirely made of A36 steel that is joined exclusively with moment-resisting welded connections, and rests on an exposed, reinforced concrete foundation.
Fortunately, the existing structure had good bones, so Edmonds + Lee was able to maintain the dwelling's original footprint, and focus on opening up the interiors.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
The Starlight is 2,007 square feet and wraps a courtyard. It includes three bedrooms, one of which is a separate master wing.
A staff worker tends to the grass roof.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The ribbed texture of the facade echoes the whitewashed walls of the area’s rural barns.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
“The factory-built modules were carefully transported up winding roads and set in place without harming a single tree,” adds the firm.
The main house comprises two primary and 11 secondary modules organized into two offset bars. One volume houses the great room that is oriented for views of the valley, while the master bedroom and study located in the other volume face northern views of the canyon.
The property offers 64 acres of varied terrain, including an open meadow, manzanita thickets, and forests full of oak, madrone, Douglas fir, and ponderosa pine.
All three flat-roofed buildings are clad in weathering steel expanded metal rainscreens, while floor-to-ceiling operable glass walls bring the outdoors in.
"In contrast to their introverted loft, High Horse Ranch was designed to be outwardly focused and defined by the site, its views, and the natural landscape," says KieranTimberlake.
Each cabin was assembled from single, mostly completed modules craned into place and raised atop concrete piers. The cabins include a bedroom and bathroom, a study desk, a  covered porch and a fire pit.
The house contains four bedrooms, one of which is presently being converted into an office.
The decades-old mango tree informed the arrangement of the home.
The concrete cladding contrasts with warm orange teak.
The wood was simply stained and left in its natural state, and reduced the need for more costly structural steel.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
Outdoor Decks
Entry
Entry
A 13-foot, cantilevered balcony extends from a second-floor bedroom; a third-floor balcony also enjoys a concrete balcony.
Trout Lake | Olson Kundig
A glimpse at the breathtaking views available from the home.
Set on the lower section of the slope, the second volume has a more modern facade, featuring concrete, steel, and glass materials.
The upper volume—where the garage, kitchen, service areas, two bathrooms, and a patio are located—is a half-submerged body of stone set within the upper section of the slope.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
“The home is quite small, but designed in such a way that you don’t feel it,” Herrin says. Lift-slide openings by Quantum Windows & Doors, which were fabricated fewer than 50 miles from the house, make the main living space seem larger.
To evoke the feel of a tiny nature cabin, two massive sliding doors can be used to divide the common areas so that each section can be isolated from the rest of the house.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.