3298 Exterior House Design Photos And Ideas - Page 47

The hardscaping helps keep water use to a minimum. The Lais used gravel—accented by drought-tolerant bamboo—to create their side yard.
One of the main draws of Kevin Freeman and Jen Feldmann’s house is its connection to the neighborhood, which is why the front porch was a must. “Homes that have a door but no outside space say, ‘I’m not interested in you,’” designer Christopher Robertson explains. “This says, ‘I’m here to be part of the community.’”
Alongside the redwood shade screen, which keeps the house from overheating, Freeman and Feldmann grow vegetables in an 18-inch-wide garden but frequently bike to nearby eateries for the local Mexican cuisine.
The home’s dramatic rear façade is composed of perforated metal screens, by Flynn & Enslow, attached to Fleetwood windows. The second floor bump out is cantilevered with no structural post below.
A patterned steel frame serves as a front wall to the street, allowing for light and noise to penetrate the interior. The owners were adamant about the importance of integrating the culture and traditions of Saigon into their home, hoping their children would grow up with a knowledge of and appreciation for the city.
The house in Western Australia addresses two main concerns: environmental sustainability and aging in place.
Sustainable elements of the home include a geothermal heat pump HVAC system, energy efficient windows and sprayed foam insulation.  The exterior wood is a vertical shiplap siding milled from FSC certified Machiche.  BauLinder Haus was designed to meet and exceed requirements put forward by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for their Indoor airPLUS qualified homes, and is working toward Energy Star qualification.
#sustainable #courtyard #wood #kansascity #baulinderhaus #hufft

Photo credit by Mike Sinclair
The house’s simple form was conceptualized as a series of stacked boxes, with public spaces residing on the ground level and private spaces in the boxes above.  In plan, the boxes are oriented in a u-shape configuration to create a generous private courtyard which was designed as an extension of the interior living space, blurring the boundaries between indoors and out.
#exterior #wood #bauhaus #courtyard #kansascity #baulinderhaus #hufft

Photo credit by Mike Sinclair
From the street, only the main house and one adjoining addition are visible, belying the spacious extension at the back. The architects call this the “Tardis effect,” named for the time machine on Dr. Who that looks much smaller on the outside than it does within.
A cedar-slat rain screen hangs on the facade of Denis Carpenter’s concrete house in Jersey City, softening its appearance and adding a modest dash of color. Carpenter keeps the awning-style windows open in the spring and summer, creating a draft that compensates for the lack of an air-conditioning system.
Inspired by Sydney Opera House, Maynard, and Austin paid careful attention to the extension’s “fifth elevation"—the way it’s seen from the sky. “The roof plan, rather than the street façade, is now the most public face of a building thanks to Google Earth,” they explain. Its tiny houses, clustered at the southern end of the property, are clad in white steel panels and western red cedar shingles, contrasting materials that emphasize their geometric forms.
In Bracebridge, Ontario, this cedar cabin with slatted wood screens treads lightly on the land. Read more about the project here.
The house that Henri Sayes designed for himself and his wife, Nicole Stock, is distinguished by a cutaway in the cedar cladding that mirrors the angular double-height space within. In the yard, a grassy berm, fashioned from earth excavated for the foundation, takes the place of a fence.
Claire and Ken Stevens approached architect Ko Wibowo to create a modern addition to their 1970s home in Tacoma, Washington. The couple’s needs had changed since Ken was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s a few years ago.
Cooke clad the building in a black-stained, sustainably-grown Canadian cedar, a durable choice that ages well and requires little maintenance. The dark glazing was chosen so windows appear seamless, accentuating the form of the building.
Christopher Simmonds Architect left the eastern white cedar untreated in order to allow it to age with the natural elements.
The patio is also equipped with a generous workspace. Bates’s original fenestration, which failed to meet current building code, has been brought up to safety standards by employing the same slatting motif used elsewhere in the house.
Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.
Architects David Arkin and Anni Tilt found a balance between passive design strategies—plenty of natural light, maximized winter sun, shaded harsh summer rays, and cross-ventilated breezes—and the latest in green technologies in this Santa Cruz strawbale house. Photo by Gabriela Hasbun. See the house come together in a "bale-raising" gathering here.
View of Second Story at the Back
Though the Quinta Ivana site was very restrictive (30 feet wide by 80 feet deep), it benefits greatly from a greenbelt area on the southern façade, which lets a tremendous amount of natural light into all three levels. Large, strategically placed glass walls further enhance that illumination, as does the restrained use of recessed lighting by Lightolier.
West Face on Approach
The cedar wrapped deck appears to carve out of the metal wrapped shape.
Wooden screens provide privacy to the Master Bedroom from the entrance facade.
Transom windows along the side of the house provide cross ventilation.
Front
Front
Balcony
The building’s south elevation. The lofty double-height balcony, with windows leading into his study, shows how the architects’ break from the triple-decker’s usual horizontality created dramatic results.
Ample windows cut into the north elevation of the Valentine House, behind which live the architects. The openings reveal lofty double-height spaces inside. The ground-floor garage often serves as a shop for architectural model-making.
The metal cladding, inspired by a nearby zinc mine, continues seamlessly onto the house’s roof for a minimalist shed effect. “The drip edge turns to make the wall,” explains architect Brandon Pace, “but changes above the window to accommodate a downspout. Any place where the metal contacts glass, or where you walk underneath, we have an internal gutter.”
Architect Yuri Zagorin Alazraki’s refined home in Mexico City is oriented as a series of stacked boxes.
Farm House, 2008. "Doing a small house is like doing a portrait of your client," says Jarmund. "In one case it’s an old abandoned farmhouse for a pair of historians. In another, it’s a guy who wants a house out of James Bond."
The Donning Community Building, constructed in 2006.
The Triangle House, 2006.
Villa Bjørnsen/Sund, 2003.
Villa by the Ocean, 2004, features a long, low profile and a green roof.
The Triangle House was completed in 2006, and its natural materials and geometric form equally embrace the surrounding forests and ocean.
Architect Jim Garrison of Brooklyn-based Garrison Architects was asked to design a retreat for visiting families on an idyllic lakeside expanse of land at a boarding school for troubled teens, Star Commonwealth in Albion, Michigan. To drastically reduce academic interruption and cut site noise, Garrison decided early on to create an 1,100-square-foot modular building dubbed Koby, with two bedrooms on opposite sides of the structure and a common dining area in the middle “as a therapeutic space for families to gather and eat together.”
Hidden away up a perilous dirt road, the Witt Guesthouse, in its material and construction, reflects the wildness of the beauty that surrounds it.
The glass doors of Muennig’s own home allow the ocean breeze through the circular entry of the sea-facing front.
The Partington Point House, which Muennig renovated in 1995.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.