2902 Exterior House Design Photos And Ideas - Page 14

Dynamic rooflines create interesting forms while simultaneously opening clerestory windows perfect for letting in natural light to each studio.
Light and shadow play on the textured facade.  Greenery frames the simple, geometric form of the house.
Built in 1948 and named 'Toyhill' by Wright himself, this Usonian home is considered an artistic masterpiece and shows Wright's early interest in overlapping circular masonry, which would become an innovative and iconic treatment found in his later work—including the Guggenheim Museum.
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
Tom Givone’s clients, Rose and Steve Smith, teach overseas and have owned their house for 26 years. They intended to fix it up slowly and retire there. As one problem led to another, they reached a point when they felt their only option, as Rose put it, was to “burn it down.”
Before the Moumings built their house, they camped out on their six acres while preparing the land for farming, planting grass and clover in place of soybean stubble. As the house arose from its foundation, soil-fixing plants grew from seed. Now the couple can focus on growing food.
Torontonians Dan and Diane Molenaar head north to Drag Lake when they need a weekend away from urban life—though they brought some of the city with them. The mirrored windows that circle the cottage were recycled from two office towers in Toronto.
House O, designed by Jun Igarashi, forgoes hallways and interior doors in favor of casually interconnected rooms.
SIERRA FRIA
This steel-and-glass house, set amid dense forest south of Ithaca, New York, captivated Maria Cook and Lance Compa when they first toured it in 2004. They bought it not long afterward and turned it into a weekend retreat.
Architecture by Jim Olson
Set in Washington's remote Methow Valley, the Studhorse House rests on a 20-acre site that is nestled in the northern portion of the 60-mile long glacial valley. The buildings are arranged to frame carefully composed views of the surrounding Studhorse Ridge and Pearrygin Lake. Design Principal, Tom Kundig.
"The Herd" as they are often referred to, sit out in the open in breathtaking scenery. Tanner Construction collaborated with Tom Kundig on the project for the same client who commissioned Delta Shelter. As the story goes, the rolling huts were zoned for an RV park so Kundig put them on steel wheels to swerve around the local building code. Photo by Tim Bies.
Olson Kundig Architects created Studhorse in Washington's remote Methow Valley as four structures oriented around a central courtyard, each positioned to best enjoy the surrounding vistas in all four seasons.
Montecito Residence - Tom Kundig / Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects
Set on a steel frame and reached by a bridge, the master suite extends up to 13 feet above the sloping grade.
The steel canopy protects the residents from Seattle’s notoriously rainy weather as they walk from the entry gate to the front door.
The two-story addition completed by Steven Ehrlich, FAIA,  is painted white and accented with green trim.
Photography by Matthew Millman
Emilio Fuscaldo sits in the garden outside the brick house that he designed for himself and his partner, Anna Krien, on a small subdivided lot in Coburg, a suburb north of Melbourne, Australia.
The concrete, steel, and glass house is divided into two distinct public and private halves.
Rian and Melissa Jorgensen's 2 Bar House in Menlo Park boasts all the usual green design suspects: energy-efficient lighting, good insulation, renewable material finishes, radiant heat, and the roof is pre-wired for future PV panels. Still, one of the homeowner's favorite aspect of  green design is the living roof planted with succulents, aloe, viviums, and ice plants.
“I wanted to plant a green roof for its thermal mass, but I wanted it to be as natural as possible,” Liang says.
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Entry drive looking through courtyard to views beyond.
The Desert House located in Desert Hot Springs is a steel structure designed with large expansive windows, and concrete flooring.
A glowing home in Japan has milky-white, one-and-a-half-inch plastic sheets wrapped around the exterior to let in light and provide insulation.
The couple’s garden-style townhouse is one of nearly 200 units that Mies van der Rohe designed for Detroit’s middle class after World War II. Zac Cruse Construction assisted with their remodel.
The Floating Farmhouse’s semitransparent addition has a roofline that matches the pitch of the original 1820s farmhouse. A porch, tucked under the side eaves, is cantilevered over a stream that runs through the property. Ikea loungers are illuminated from the interior by commercial gymnasium lights repurposed as pendant lamps.
House NA from 2011 has glass walls and a steel structural frame containing a matrix of tiny rectangular rooms and outdoor terraces, each on a separate floor level linked by stairs, ladders, or movable steps. Hemmed in by neighboring homes on three sides and a narrow street in front, the house belongs to a couple clearly at ease with Tokyo’s urban condition.
Adding 290 square feet to this already small (just 566 square feet) black A-frame in Brecht, Belgium, was all the local building ordinances allowed, but the architects at dmvA found that a single wing extended out to the side gave resident Rini van Beek all the storage and living space that she needs.
For a San Francisco couple living on a hill overlooking the Mission District, glass walls were a must. Indoor louvers allow the residents to frame their view of the city, much like the aperture on a camera.
Built with specially-formulated concrete made of volcanic ash, this micro-house in Tokyo maximizes space through vertical construction. 
When Tokyo-based architecture firm Atelier TEKUTO received a brief from their clients to build a distinctive, environmentally-conscious concrete home, they embarked on a two-and-a-half year journey of spacial and material exploration. Built in 2015, the result—the R Torso C project—recently won the Overall Excellence Award and first place in the low-rise buildings category at the 2017 American Concrete Institute Awards.
Context and Contrast in the Alps | Austria

An Austrian vacation home’s design references its mountainside setting and expansive views across the valley. By Tom Lechner / LP Architektur
The exterior is a mix of wood and stone, and the ground floor is clad in locally-quarried Algonquin limestone around the perimeter.
The perpendicular volume faces toward the creek. On the ground level, the kitchen, living room, and dining area overlooks a courtyard that contains a small tree.
An L-shaped configuration organizes the ground-floor spaces. The volume that accommodates the grandparents' suite contains a kitchenette, a bedroom, and a private bathroom.
A sweeping, arc roof that slopes steeply on one side.
The house is set within an expansive meadow.
Supported on thin columns, the main volume hovers above the graveled entry, reaching out into the surroundings.
The mirror-clad shed gives the property a sense of constant movement.
Californian modernism informs the shape of this Minnesota residence.
The house was constructed with a wooden frame and cellulose insulation.
Arterra Landscape Architects revitalized the surrounding woodland, creating a natural, native environment for the home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.