69 Exterior House Mid Century Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

When Wexler and Harrison’s steel homes first hit the market in 1962, they were competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Shown above is Steel House #2.
A post and beam entry plus a delicate brise soleil make up the entrance to 572 W Santa Elena Road.
The dramatic home features a striking black and white facade.
After narrowly escaping demolition in the 1990s, Frank Lloyd Wright's Thaxton House has been respectfully restored and updated—and it just returned to the market for $2,850,000. The house is one of only three Wright-designed homes in Texas, and it's the sole Wright residence in Houston.
Originally designed in 1939 by Roscoe Hemenway, the Burton House was once home to famed artist Verne Tossey, who was best known for his campy pulp fiction book covers throughout the 1950s and 60s. Recently, Portland-based designer Benjamin Silver and builder Oliver Olson have completely renovated the home, transforming the property into a modern interpretation of Hemenway's original design.
Designed to comfortably accommodate three to five employees, the 1,000-square-foot home office by Matt Fajkus Architecture complements an existing midcentury abode. The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. The wood-and-stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that jives with the existing home's midcentury style.
South elevation of remodeled existing home with modern addition.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
Originally built in 1940, this 3,260-square-foot home has undergone a complete redesign, reimagining the property as a midcentury-inspired, contemporary estate. The renovation of the four-bedroom, five-bath residence also included the addition of an entirely new wing and landscaping including cacti and palm trees . Highlights of the home include an open indoor/outdoor floor plan, a vaulted tongue-and-groove ceiling in the great room, expansive glazing, and gorgeous desert landscaping across the 16,000-square-foot lot. The iconic home also comes with a bit of local history, as it was previously owned by Florian Boyd, the former Mayor of Palm Springs from 1953 to 1957.
The front façade received fresh white paint and new landscaping. The blue door was painted "Flaming Torch" from Behr, a vibrant orange.
Built by Robert Marx for the inventor/founder of Tastee-Freez in Rancho Mirage, the Maranz Residence is one of the most iconic homes in Rancho Mirage, a desert resort just east of Palm Springs. Designed by Val Powelson, the plans were based the hyperbolic paraboloid roof, a principle that was at the peak of engineering innovation in the late 1950s.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
Located in Bunker Hill, the Thaxton House features all the hallmarks of Usonian design. It's defined by a simple, natural material palette and offers ample opportunities for indoor/outdoor living.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.
Visitors can take a trip to Georgia O'Keeffe's former home and studio in Abiquiu, New Mexico, and get a sense of the landscape and surroundings that inspired her.
The terrace provides a quiet place to enjoy the forested surroundings.
The home’s original facade was clad in plain-looking siding, which was common in the ’50s and ’60s. The renovation finished the facade with smooth stucco, expansion joints, Hardie siding, and redwood.
A long bluestone roof deck overlooks the pool and the expansive lawn.
The midcentury modern home is located on 1.7 acres of land and features bluestone terraces, fieldstone walls, and elevated views of the countryside.
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
The Samuel-Novarro home's distinctive facade.
A street view of 2255 Verde Oak Drive.
The residence is perfectly integrated into the adjacent hillside.
A street view of the Samuel-Novarro House by Lloyd Wright.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
While this architecturally significant three-bedroom, four-bath home was prelude to the iconic architect's future work, The David and Gladys Wright House is now considered FLW’s last residential masterpiece.
Lanefab Design/Build demolished the existing carport and replaced it with a new addition that included the new entry, dining room, family room, mud room, and garage.
The hillside home includes multiple outdoor living spaces, including a wraparound deck, landscaped grounds, and a two-car garage/workspace.
A quiet moment of light and shadow highlights the home's Japanese influence.
The grand entrance to Woods Cove Retreat welcomes the homeowners and guests.
LDA	and	Graham	Architecture's approach to Woods Cove Retreat was to honor	the	character	of the original structure	while	focusing on maintaining privacy	and	functionality	for	this	busy	family of	four.
A view of the home at night.
The post-and-beam construction has a dramatic carport entrance which showcases the home's clean, midcentury lines.
The property's former Spanish hacienda-style, red-tile roof has been replaced with a contemporary metal one as part of the renovation.
A view of the guest house, which is included in the sale.
An exterior view of the property.
Set on a 7.7-acre lot, the 3,400-square-foot residence is both spacious and compact with a natural flagstone facade and black-stained cedar framing.
The facade features a clean and classic midcentury profile.
The house is, thanks to a new owner, in excellent, original condition.
A look at the backside of the home.
The evening view of the glass louvered studio below with the roof deck.
Ogosta used staggered board-form concrete site walls to raise the house above the street level.
Thanks to a complete revamp, this midcentury gem now has a fresh new look.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
Its cast-concrete roof slabs evoke any number of desert sights—the fronds of a palm, the faces of stones, even the armored plates of an armadillo.
A back view of the house reveals its glass facade and perch on the hillside overlooking East Honolulu.
The Hammerman House is truly a masterpiece of California Modernism.
And the home is bathed in natural light from walls of glass on both sides.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000.
The main house channels a midcentury vibe.
The facade

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.