489 Exterior House Mid Century Design Photos And Ideas - Page 6

MDO panels the color of California poppies accent the home’s exterior.
Chris and Laura Porter’s new master suite connects to the rest of the house via an indoor/outdoor bridge that comprises a covered deck and small library; Bonelli windows and Fleetwood sliders look out on a landscape designed by Christine Ferris.
An exterior view of the property.
Overhanging roof eaves help protect the home from unwanted solar gain.
The covered approach, a common element in Wright's works, is flanked by Japanese stone lanterns.
Writer Marc Kristal described the house as "a lapidary example of Miesian simplicity: a 25-by-95-foot rectangle, composed of a black exposed-steel frame, front and northern elevations clad largely in white glazed brick, and southern and western exposures enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass sliders."
A flat roofline and solid post-and-beam construction create the clean lines of this classic midcentury profile.
The Waymire Residence has a stunning profile with classic midcentury lines, and is set against the backdrop of Los Angeles.
Set on a 7.7-acre lot, the 3,400-square-foot residence is both spacious and compact with a natural flagstone facade and black-stained cedar framing.
11 Tallwoods Road in Armonk, NY
The facade features a clean and classic midcentury profile.
The Luberas didn’t use a general contractor or architect, but they did enlist the counsel of legendary Detroit designer Ruth Adler Schnee, who in 1964 helped Girard plan  the color scheme for a streetscape  in Columbus, Indiana.  Window alignments create long views through the house and atrium.
When Rob and Mary Lubera started pulling threads to uncover the origins of their new home—the lone midcentury house amid rows of Tudor Revivals in suburban Detroit—not even architecture scholars could have anticipated what they would find. Theirs is the last surviving residence by Alexander Girard (1907–1993), a modernist visionary who made his name in textiles but tried his hand at virtually everything, architecture included. The shoji-like laminate screens, seen  in the entryway, are characteristic of his Japanese-influenced work.
The house is, thanks to a new owner, in excellent, original condition.
Pereira’s modernist ranch for Firestone combined "the strength of his commercial work with the lightness that desert living demanded." The timeless home still looks every bit as contemporary today as it did when it was originally built.
The view from the upper wraparound deck.
The entry of the wood-clad property features beautiful midcentury lines.
A look at the exterior of the home.
The home is surrounded by an acre of woods and overlooks the Great Salt Lake which provides stunning sunset views.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Pederson was thrilled to be able to keep the home's floor-to-ceiling glass walls—a feature not possible with new construction because of the Title 24 restrictions.
A look at the backside of the home.
The home and its distinctive California casual elegance been featured in design and architecture books.
The evening view of the glass louvered studio below with the roof deck.
The front of the house restored and adapted
A dramatic triangular wooden truss extends the butterfly roof beyond the glass wall of the living room, also shading the stone-paved terrace. A low stone wall expands from the house into the surrounding landscape.
Inspired by Philip Johnson's Glass House, the home was developed in a collaboration between Swedish architect Iver Lofving—an architect at the Philip Johnson Architecture Studio who worked on the iconic Seagram Building—and Athos Zacharias, a moderin abstract painter who was working at the time as a studio assistant to Jackson Pollock and later to Elaine de Kooning.
Ogosta used staggered board-form concrete site walls to raise the house above the street level.
Thanks to a complete revamp, this midcentury gem now has a fresh new look.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
“At night, the Smith House appears to float like a glass box in space.
The vertical part of the "T" contains the living and dining rooms, which are divided by a fireplace. This area also provides the most dramatic vantage point for the sweeping views.
Here is a look at the elegant entrance.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
This home is iconic of Sugden’s work in Utah, and is a direct expression of both the Modernist movement and the Bauhaus school.
Like all of Sugden’s work, the building frame is entirely made of A36 steel that is joined exclusively with moment-resisting welded connections, and rests on an exposed, reinforced concrete foundation.
Fortunately, the existing structure had good bones, so Edmonds + Lee was able to maintain the dwelling's original footprint, and focus on opening up the interiors.
The stylish midcentury has an elegant profile.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The atrium-style design perfectly integrates a sense of the outdoors throughout the home.
The atrium door at the front entry (on the right) is painted a light blue—the same accent color that has been used in the home's kitchen and bathroom.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Side Wall
Miller House Front Facade
The decidedly nontraditional structure includes a front wall that opens the living room onto the front yard—and to the rest of the neighborhood, which has enthusiastically welcomed the house and its owner.
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Courtyard House View
A guest room and office wing were added to the front of the house. This left the living room roof in tact – a key feature of the original design, and created a front courtyard that define the entry sequence as a unique experience.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.