68 Exterior Cabin Building Type Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The floating suites are scattered throughout the site.
After sunset the effect is reversed, and a radiating internal glow emerges from between the wooden slats.
Night views.
An exterior view.
The wood screens translate the elegant vertical movement of the reeds into a repetitive geometric pattern.
A view of the surrounding wraparound deck and wooden privacy screens.
The architecture almost evokes primitive constructions in the midst of the lake's reeds.
A wooden gangplank leads from shore to suite.
Nic Lehoux
The Treehouse, also part of the Post Ranch Inn, features Cor-ten panels.
The facade is clad with beveled siding, stained dark to meld into the forest.
main elevation
Windows are punctuate the façades of the new cabins at unexpected but strategic locations in order to frame and maximize views.
The two new cabins, also by Jensen & Skodvin Architects, are built on a steep hillside. They are held aloft by narrow steel rods and clad in a lumber stained to blend into the natural surroundings.
Project Name: Orchard

Website: http://www.ideabox.us/
South façade
In a remote second-growth forest in Sullivan County, New York, is an off-the-grid tree house that was constructed with the help of the trees around it.  
 Sited on a steep, sloping hill surrounded by trees, the 360-square-foot project was designed to accommodate a limited $20,000 construction budget—and to be approachable enough that amateur weekend builders could construct it.  
Architects Mike Jacobs, Biayna Bogosian, Forrest Jessee, Leopold Lambert, and Luis Gutierrez of award-winning New York practice Jacobschang Architecture designed a tree house structure that overcame the challenge of the site's steep topography.
Main entrance façade
Snow buries scrub oak trees in front of the home's west elevation.
The home's deck is perched over a canyon full of wildlife and rugged vegetation.
Warm cedar siding contrasts the snow capped ridge on a bright Utah winter day.
The wooded site allowed for  soaring, curtainless windows that the couple couldn’t have enjoyed downtown.
Christopher Simmonds Architect left the eastern white cedar untreated in order to allow it to age with the natural elements.
Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.
2017 winner The Little House in Seabeck, Washington by MW Works  captures the essence of a cabin in the woods, despite its more generous size.
The Red House, 2002.
Debbi Gibbs loved the seeming wilderness of the area, especially considering its relative proximity to her New York apartment. She bought a ramshackle cabin with plans to tear it down and start fresh, then bided her time until she found just the right architects. Enter Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz of Resolution: 4 Architecture, who granted her wish for an open prefabricated structure with custom design touches.
Buser and Chapoton blackened the exterior cladding themselves.
The charred cedar exterior gently basks in the Alaskan sun.
The facade is clad with beveled siding, stained dark to meld into the forest.
The House for a Musher is all about taking advantage of its hilltop site. The courtyard in the front has vast views and the house itself is oriented toward the surrounding landscape.
“This was really a parameter-driven project,” explains Lukasz Kos, a Toronto-based designer and cofounder of the architecture firm Testroom. “That is, I had to let the trees decide how the tree house would be.”

What the trees decided, apparently, was that they wanted a gracefully slender, Blade Runner–like elevator lodged between them. They also decided they didn’t want to be too mutilated in the process. Kos responded to their needs with the low-impact 4Treehouse, a lattice-frame structure that levitates above the forest floor of Lake Muskoka, Ontario, under the spell of some witchy architectural magic.

He created this effect by suspending the two-ton, 410-square-foot tree house 20 feet above the ground with steel airline cables. With only one puncture hole in each of the four trunks into which the cable is anchored, the trees get away almost entirely unscathed, and the structure attains the visual effect of being suspended weightlessly in midair. 

At the base of the tree, a staircase rolls on casters upon two stone slabs, allowing occupants to enter and exit regardless of how much the tree house may be swaying or rocking in the wind. Solid plywood walls punctuated by a floor of red 

PVC constitute the “opaque” base story, which is largely protected from the outside elements. “The idea was to have the tree house open up as it gained elevation,” explains Kos. The second story is surrounded by a vertical lattice frame, allowing for breezes, air, and light to filter softly through walls while still establishing a visual perimeter between outside and inside space. At top, the tree house is completely penned in, a suspended patio with a ceiling of sky.  br> br>Photo by Lukasz Kos.
In the land of large mountain lodge wannabes, two California natives tuck Utah’s first LEED for Homes–rated house onto the side of Emigration Canyon. Photo by Dustin Aksland
In the shadow of the newly renamed mountain Denali, amid Alaska’s meadows and icy streams, a former teacher and a four-time Iditarod winner built a modernist cabin as expansive as the Last Frontier.
For the Butterfly cabin, which is part of the Post Ranch Inn, Muennig chose materials that age gracefully when exposed to the elements. He regularly uses Cor-Ten steel, a group of steel alloys that form a stable rust-like appearance when battered by wind and rain.
Delta Shelter, a cabin getaway on the same property as the Rolling Huts. We visited the owner and his wife during one of our visits to get an in-person reference for Tanner Construction. It was wonderful to see the house in person after drooling over it in the pages of Tom Kundig: Houses. Photo by Tim Bies.
Designed by Jensen & Skovdin, the Juvet's first-generation cabins are built on stilts in order to impact the environment as little as possible. Despite the modernist aesthetic, the buildings were built by local craftsmen using traditional materials and techniques.
One of the most astounding views from the house extends all the way to Mt. McKinley, the highest point in North America at over 20,000 feet.
Perched over a cliff face, the hooded deck of the Gambier Residence reads like a ship’s prow over Howe Sound, the scenic waters near Vancouver.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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