11 Exterior Apartment Building Type Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Designed as a complex of eight housing units for a tight urban infill site, the MOD urban apartments were the first modular apartment building constructed in Seattle. When completed in 2013, the project achieved LEED Gold certification; its interior layouts eliminated the need for an elevator or internal hallways, and was outfitted with Energy Star appliances, low VOC paint and finishes, and radiant heating.
Based in Portland, Oregon, MODSpdx is a West Coast builder with a holistic approach to customized and site-specific modular multi-family and commercial buildings. Buildings are constructed in their Portland factory, with a focus on proper ventilation and thermodynamics for the finished product through tight factory controls and an analysis of repeatable processes. Because the company works with a range of general contractors, architects, construction companies, and residential developers, their finished homes vary in aesthetics from traditional to contemporary.
Built on the site of a former horse stable, Art Stable is a mixed-use infill project in Seattle, Washington, that boasts an 80-foot-tall hinge for hand-cranked doors. Photo by: Benjamin Benschneider.
Segal’s urban-infill units (like the Titan shown here) eschew typical features like dysfunctional balconies and underground garages.
The Forj Lofts is a Minimalistic/ Scandinavian design. Residing on the Atlantic coast of Delaware, the project is engineered for extreme wind loads. The Forj name is a play on words for an Iron Forge, as there is nothing but steel used for the building components. Limited staging areas for material and crew mandated a carefully executed shipment and assembly program. These steel metal homes are just one example of how steel can be used in multi-family construction.
Floor-to-ceiling windows front each unit, with sections of container wall folded out and fixed in place as part of the shading strategy.
The eight container apartments, huddled together in a wise use of the space, are situated on an old used car lot in downtown Phoenix. A decommissioned container costs between $1,800 and $5,000, says architect Wesley James. Transportation, handling, and site assembly run at least as much.
Many of the items in the home come from Mjölk, on the ground floor of Daoust and Baker’s building, which dates to the 1870s and has a distinctive tin facade.
The containers are fused side-by-side, giving each apartment a 16-foot width. They are then stacked in four pairs with wrought, industrial-style exterior staircases in-between. To spare living space and installation headaches, a cinder block core houses utilities and a bathroom for each unit.
The apartments face a landscaped common courtyard. The site is an irregular trapezoid, a fact the zig-zagging sidewalks reflect well.
Residents are allowed a small swatch of land to plant gardens.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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