20554 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Hans J. Wegner Wishbone Chairs surround the large dining table on axis with the grand, exterior windows.
Lisa and the boys playing Ring Around the Rosie. (2016, before the guest suite addition)
Private garden with deck
Northeast. The facade to the northeast has an indentation over the second floor with a hidden window row that gives an indistinct light in the social space.
The row of pillars continues to the same height as around the upper house and crowns of a horizontal beam. The composition from the inside continues on the outside and also marks the location of a future roof terrace.
The Casa de vidro, shortly after its completion.
Bo Bardi's Casa de vidro, nestled in the jungle of São Paulo.
Below Kovel’s apartment is Fritts’ furniture shop, Intelligent Design, and around the corner West Enders can expect a new branch of Seattle’s Ace Hotel and the new Portland headquarters for the architecture firm Zimmer Gunsul Frasca.
The most dramatic view in the apartment, the First Presbyterian Church looms large in the Kovel living room.
The kitchen features a concrete island topped with marble. Deja-Vu stools by Naoto Fukasawa surround the island. A print by Guy Gormley, as well as a painting bought during holiday in St. Tropez, hang on the walls.
The architect chose granite for the house’s base, zinc for its roof, and Scandinavian pinewood for cladding—all materials that complement the nearby gray stone building.
An office nook and library can participate in the open plan or disappear behind pocket doors.
Once a horse stable, this Chicago house first got a superficial makeover from Oprah (we wonder whether Stedman likes modern) before architect Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang was called in for a more substantial renovation and a dazzlingly porous brick screen.
The large, naturally lit kitchen is the heart of the house. Messmate-clad cupboards and huge expanses of glass dominate the space where Angelucci uses the sink, Gorman works at the kitchen island, and Pepa and Hazel look on. Play in the courtyard between the kitchen and garage is easily supervised and enclosed from the alley behind the house.
The sharp ridgeline and soaring soffit reference a tent-like experience in an architecturally elegant way.
Weinfeld’s cinematic streak is also evident in the home’s interiors: he designed the entertainment center in the media room. The rug is from  Clatt Carpete & Cia. Throughout the house, the Strozenbergs use floor-to-ceiling curtains for privacy.
The windows themselves come from Lumisystem.
The kitchen is a vibrant deep blue. "It's the same color Le Corbusier used in the corridor of his Villa Savoye in Poissy," Van Everbroeck reports.
Van Everbroeck’s home office occupies the end of one arm of the building. An industrial outdoor light fixture is mounted on a black-painted steel post. The orange of the back wall was chosen to work with the glowing rays of the sunset and the silhouetted, dancing shadows of leaves.
The exterior is clad in louro gamela,a tropical hardwood.
Inside the home green and blue are used for the bathroom block, dark brown for the sliding door, and orange for the wall dividing the living room from the kitchen. The floor is dark gray industrial poured concrete.
Just off Pacific Avenue, architect Lorcan O’Herlihy designed this home for himself and his wife with a dark blue façade and dazzling display of colored window.
Architect Don Dimster designed this duplex as two family homes – one for him and his family and one for his brother’s family – with a pair of glass-walled, suspended steel stairways that connect both family homes to a shared 1,000-square-foot rooftop patio.
Designed by Boston-based architect Sebastian Mariscal, this house, which celebrates the best of Californian indoor-outdoor living, was designed to frame views of the trees and the surrounding landscape.
Master balcony designed to give the experience of being in and living below the canopy of a tree.  The windows are positioned and oriented to allow the ocean breezes to flow through the home
Of the seven steps in Michael Pozner’s not-quite-500-square-foot aerie in Greenwich Village, five contain drawers. His small set of table and chairs is from CB2.
From the grass roof patios, the house disappears almost completely, leaving only the landscape, water, and occasional passing orca.
At the heart of the rejuvenated duplex is a monolithic “wedge core,” which houses a common stairwell
Lawrence Weiner sits at his daylit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking 

up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel.
Lawrence and Alice confer in the ground-floor kitchen. Traces of color are visible everywhere, including the orange-and-yellow curtains and pink coathooks.
North Elevation
Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. 

Photo by Ryota Atarashi.
Villa H | oak wooden stairs between raw concrete walls
Photography by Matthew Millman
Stripping paint to reveal the beautiful riveting and aluminum was one the hardest but most rewarding tasks.  To me, revealing the structure and construction honors the original craftsmanship that went into this trailer.
Designed by Stockholm firm Waldemarson Berglund Arkitekter, this prefab artist studio called Ateljé 25 is shaped like a Monopoly house, serves as an artist’s studio and has simple plywood interiors and massive skylights.
The clients were active participants in the conversation about how to mitigate challenges like street traffic noise (the house is set right on a major thoroughfare) and how to relieve some of the visual pressure of the openness of the front facade. The garage is located below the envelope of the height and coverage-restricted house which results in the floor and driveway level with the street, a critical detail in snow country.
In contrast to the intensity of the front facade is a wood-skin section of the house on the rear facade, containing sleeping areas that cantilever over the outdoor bar and dining area.
The window in one of the upstairs bedrooms horizontally frames the view.
Texture, light, and a pureness of materiality turn the bathroom into a balanced composition.
The staircase also plays with the concept of gaps and slices.
The eye is drawn down the corridor towards the slice of light.
In the main living space, a glass-and-steel bridge is suspended above the kitchen area, becoming a viewport that draws the eye towards the lake.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.