30553 Home Design Ideas and Photos

The poplar desk at the end of the master bedroom loft looks down on the living areas beneath the slanted, wood-clad ceiling. The compact interior of the house was inspired by ship-building techniques, with built-in furniture and storage throughout.
The custom bed features under-mattress drawers.
“At Sliding House, the outside world is more present,” says Rhonda, “always visible through the sliver of window that runs across the length of the house and down to the ground.” The living area’s Carter leather sectional is by Gus Modern, and the boat carving is by local folk artist Bradford Naugler. The family sought to source Canadian furnishings and materials as much as possible.
Imagined as a jewel box on a hill, Sliding House takes the place of a barn that once stood on this Nova Scotia site. Its form follows the slope of the land, while the windows are parallel with the horizon, setting up a tension between a plumb interior and a slanted exterior. The tilt of the structure isn’t just a visual trick—it also helps the roof to drain. When the distinctive windows are lit from within, the house serves as a beacon for local sailors.
The cabin's living room area opens up to the surroundings. Walls and ceiling are clad in birch veneer while the floor is in solid birch.
The living room's double height makes the space seem larger that its actual size. Stairs leading up to the sleeping loft are placed next to the open fireplace. The plastered wall and the soapstone tiles on the floor add some roughness to the wooden interior.
Woody35's distinct shape makes it stand out from its surroundings despite the modest size of the building.
In the open living and dining room of a hillside family home in Japan, Eames shell chairs surround a custom walnut table by Kagura. The upholstered seating is by Arflex. The architect, Masahiro Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio, also designed the custom kitchen island and stove vent.
Light cascades into the living room through a row of six insulated timber windows on the south wall. The north wall flares out to create what Schaer calls a sunset scoop. “It grabs the late afternoon and evening sun and brings it deep into the space,” he explains.
Landscape designer Jay Griffith recreated the area between the house and the studio.
Wes Mahony lounges on a Tufty-Time sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia in the family room that architect Emily Jagoda created for his family in their tree-damaged garage in Santa Monica.
An austere palette defines the master bathroom, with subway tiles from Classic Tile New York, matte-black fixtures by California Faucets, and black perforated-aluminum Branch sconces by RBW.
The vestibule is painted in Benjamin Moore’s coral-hued Hot Spice and covered in a Cuban-inspired floral wallpaper by fashion designer Matthew Williamson for Osborne & Little.
Lyons and Brill designed several custom touches, like the copper-plated knobs they installed on the Sektion kitchen cabinetry from IKEA, painted in Farrow & Ball’s muted Breakfast Room Green.
The couple’s bold mix-and-match sensibility applies most unconventionally to the material palette; nearly every surface is different from the next. The cook station pairs a copper Watermark faucet with an Italian marble countertop, a copper-toned stainless-steel range from Blue Star, and a backsplash of masonry Foundation Brick tile by Ann Sacks.
An original marble fireplace now acts as a display area for a colorful collection of vases from CB2; a geometric floral Medina Tibetan carpet by Madeline Weinrib adds a touch of pattern to the room.
Interior designer Merrill Lyons plays with her son in the Brooklyn home she renovated with her husband, Charles Brill, a lighting designer and cofounder of New York–based company Rich Brilliant Willing (RBW). The couple’s design sensibility is marked by a warm mix of historic periods and styles, punctuated with pieces by RBW, including the circular brass Cinema chandelier that hangs in the living room. The leather sofa and teak  credenza are vintage; the 1960s rosewood Genius armchair by Danish designer Illum Wikkelso was reupholstered with fabric sourced from an outlet.
Master Bath

Casale and Crofton’s bedroom is configured as a casual open suite, with a sliding aluminum screen as the only barrier separating an adjacent bathroom and walk-in closet. The screen’s dappled, lacelike pattern was designed by Fiyel Levent, a local artist and architect. Bischoff handed her design to a metalworker, who then carved it into aluminum with a digital laser cutter. It runs on a track in front of a partial wall covered in wallpaper by Neisha Crosland. 

The vanity, designed and built in the MADE studio, sits atop the legs from an antique refrigerator that Bischoff and his team found in a junkyard. Calacatta mosaic tile, another MADE leftover, lines the floor of the shower (not shown). The firm had a limited surplus, so the amount of tile available dictated the shower stall’s footprint. “We have a keen understanding of the challenges presented by integrating the new with the existing,” Bischoff says of his approach. “We took this blank canvas and tailored it to the needs that Dawn and Dave had for their home. The result is fresh and unique but retains the patina of the many parts from which it was made.”
Nate’s Bedroom

Now three, Nate occupies coveted corner real estate in a third-floor room with a treetop-level view. “It’s a great space,” Casale says, “although it is the noisiest room in the house because of the street. But by now he’s so used to sleeping through all of the sounds, I don’t think it bothers him.” 

The brightness of the space is enhanced by an accent wall coated in fire engine–red chalkboard paint (Benjamin Moore Natura flat-finish paint in Vermillion mixed with unsanded grout) that Nate can scribble on—as soon as his parents get around to telling him that it’s allowed. A matching red pendant lamp from the Soho shop Kiosk hangs above a six-foot-tall teepee by Dexton Kids.
Bathroom

A creative way of cutting costs is on display in son Nate’s bathroom, where the wall tiles are arranged in a whimsical, irregular pattern making use of slim sections of tile cut for transitions and corners. “We came up with a pattern that could incorporate random sizes so we were able to order the exact amount of tile that we needed,” Bischoff says. “It allowed us to get the most out of the tile price because there wasn’t that 20 percent that [would normally go] into the landfill.” The two-bowl sink is the Vitviken model from Ikea; it’s topped with a chrome Hansgrohe faucet and accented by Ikea’s Godmorgon medicine cabinets customized by MADE.
Paul spreads out his toys on a rug from Pottery Barn.
Brightened by light from the backyard, the built-in credenzas and kitchen cabinetry are by JKK Woodcraft. A Kartell FL/Y pendant lamp bridges the glass and wood details.
Facing the front facade on the English basement level, a sectional of Dixon’s design punctuates the otherwise neutral hues with a stately purple. The lamp is a double-suspension Tolomeo from Artemide. The reupholstered Thonet chair lends balance to the room through its own asymmetry.
In the family room, Lucien gets an early start on his music career with his father’s help. The space, technically the third floor of the structure, overlooks the central living area below.
Inspired by the campaign furniture from the colonial era, the Voyager deck chair and Ambient lantern evoke a contemporary look with a vintage allure.
A dining nook sits just inside the entrance of Andrea Maffei and Rossella Acierno’s 850-square-foot residence.
From the 1940s through the late 1960s, Arts & Architecture was  the unofficial headquarters of California’s nascent modernist movement. It spearheaded the Case Study House Program, which  produced some of America’s  greatest residences. VKG furniture was used for many of the houses, and appears in photos shot by Julius Shulman, as seen above.
Close-up stair to sleeping loft with storage compartments, including back-lit acrylic display box
Bedroom view from the hallway
Alexander Vertikoff
bedroom
Stairs / Under stairs Closet

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.