29552 Home Design Ideas and Photos

SnapSpace Solutions fabricated the cargotecture building.
Victoria collects paraphernalia from medical catalogs, like the model spine on display in her study (bottom). The chrome Triennale Atomic Orbiter floor lamp is by Robert Sonneman.
Raise the Roof 

Using a commercial roof in a residential project was a first for architect Michael Epstein. While similar systems are often covered, Epstein chose this long-span roof deck from Epic Metals for its beam-like interior face, which hides fastenings in its deep grooves, creating a flat-panel appearance.
In the master suite, a painting by Eric Freeman hangs over a West Elm bed.
Pirman, an illustrator, works on a vintage Florence Knoll table in his studio at the front of the house.
Benjamin Moore’s Tomato Red provides “punctuation” to the exterior. “That was the cheapest way to have that hot spark of color,” Pirman explains.
In the kitchen, Pirman and Tetreault gather around a custom Corian island with a Tara faucet by Dornbracht. Vintage Cees Braakman Combex series chairs and a marble Florence Knoll table bring natural materials to an architectural shell built from concrete, glass, and steel.
More storage has been rigged in high places for bikes.
The sitting room.
The front entrance of the Farley Studio presents a clean, minimalist space—a stark contrast to the colorful clutter of the painting studio hidden behind corrugated-metal walls at the back of the house.
To enlarge the bathroom, they integrated the closet space into the new bathroom, and thus had to create new storage. They designed a custom walnut bed wall in the master bedroom that contains built-in wardrobes.
Similar to other Eichlers in this style, the office looks through the courtyard and into the living room. Klopf Architecture made minor necessary adjustments to the windows but preserved the bulk of the clerestory windows.
The new gray porcelain tiles are fit seamlessly throughout the space and into the courtyard. The more open kitchen now has a wall of built-in storage and an oversized island with both walnut and a brightly-colored siding.
In order to open up the space, Klopf Architecture took out some walls that were supporting beams. Klopf explains, “We used a structural trick by putting a cross-beam on the roof, which you don’t see. The ceiling now has an open, more expansive feeling—more post-and-beam.”
A vintage suspended wall unit serves as a home office. Cathy demonstrates the "third bedroom"—a three-person hammock from Oaxaca.
The catwalk running above the studio is aptly named for the  household: Farley’s felines patrol their owners’ activity from this overhead perch.
Family art room, the heart of the house where this family's shared passion of creating art together is nurtured.
Reading Room by Studio Carver
“There was too much visual pollution disturbing the simplicity. The goal was to allow the existing buildings to work within a totally new program, each still distinguishable by its own destiny.” —Architect Bart Len
Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution for the bathroom. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.”
The room also contains a sofa by Flexform, cushions from textile firm Chevalier Masson, a Jens Fager candelabra, and a painting by Roger Raveel.
With the help of architect Bart Lens, Veerle Wenes and Bob Christiaens merged a 19th-century building with a 1970s one to create a combined home and art gallery in Antwerp. In the dining room downstairs, Wenes entertains family, friends, and gallery visitors. The yellow chair is by Jens Fager.
A discreet built-in wardrobe in the bedroom.
Stairs leading up to the platform bed double as storage for books.
Photo caption: Additional storage was built along one angled wall of the bedroom loft and beneath the skylight.
plexiglas shelving detail
The bath’s Kohler Purist fixtures and Frederick Weinberg animal figures sit on a Corian countertop
Because their loft is a rental, David and Im Schafer built everything to be removable.
Elbow chairs by Hans J. Wegner  for Carl Hansen & Søn surround  a table of the couple’s own design. By removing walls in this space, extra storage was possible. The trio of A330S pendants are by Alvar Aalto for Artek. The painting, The Look, is by Ed Parker.
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Brooklyn, New York
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
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Brooklyn, New York
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
The net seat uses an extension of the handrail as a frame and hangs above the studio, creating  an unusual reading perch. Extra storage is built into the stairs, where CDs, movies, and blankets are kept.

Jersey City, New Jersey
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Pozner credits Borowski with the idea to use a roller shade, purchased at the Shade Store, to close off the sleeping loft. The simple intervention, neither sound- nor lightproof, is sufficient to demarcate one “room” from another.
The Charm Townhouse - Master bathroom
The ever-changing daylight, plus the use of curtains and lighting options, means that Ahlgren and Lökaas enjoy a variety of different atmospheres.
The office, which is a single-level separate unit, boasts Ikea desks and a signed work by Gilbert and George (friends of the couple).
The view from the kitchen is as lively as it is light, taking in the dining area, tiny courtyard garden, and the separate office building backed by the jumble of old buildings to the rear. The rustic dining chairs are by Börge Mogensen from Karl Andersson & Söner.
As you ascend towards the roof, the house becomes increasingly transparent.
The house’s street-level entrance shows an openness to its surroundings, and a glass door allows curious passersby a glimpse of the interior.
The living room has a close-up street view and abundant natural light. The sofa is Mags from Hay Studio, the table is an old Fritz Hansen base with a new top, and the Arne Jacobsen chair is also a refurbished vintage piece.
The walls of the cinema room/guest bedroom are covered with Seasons Autumn Cloud Forest. Because it’s a cinema room, Zeng and her husband knew they wanted a dark colored wallpaper to help minimize the light reflection from the projector. "We immediately thought of our Cloud Forest design. Full of drama, the surreal composition of plants floating between the clouds seemed like the perfect fit for a cinema room," she says.
For the bedroom, she has used Seasons Summer Tropical Bloom, which is one of Zeng’s favorite designs. She knew she wanted a busy, dense floral pattern behind the bed to create the feeling of falling asleep in a jungle.
For the living room, Zeng has used Seasons Winter Snowdrift. She opted for this design in the living room because she wanted a minimal pattern that would complement whatever furniture or plants she brought in. She was looking for a pattern that was easy on the eye, and one that would still allow the space to breathe.
The sink organizer is from Joseph & Joseph, while the white porcelain vase is from Timea Sido.
Above, the chair is from Made, and the flower pots are from Habitat.
An up-close look at the dining table from Maisons du Monde, a pink dining chair from Habitat, and a black dining chair from Muuto.
Zeng has beautifully woven modern and classic elements throughout her home's decor. The Sofa Workshop is upholstered with Andrew Martin fabric. The armchair and coffee table are from Made.
Because this was their first home purchase, Zeng admits she was a little obsessive about making it perfect. She used inspiration boards and mock-ups to help her visual each room.
Here is a look at her Dino Yellow Green wallpaper. When preparing her designs, Zeng will often create a pattern where the repetition isn't too obvious, as she believes this makes the look more immersive.
Born in China, Sian Zeng moved to Hungary with her parents when she was seven. She later relocated to London, where she studied textile design at Central Saint Martins, and now lives with her husband.
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Reeve's partner, Michela Meazza, uses built-in closets for her home office. The imposing gunmetal gray doors can simply be swung shut at the end of a long day's work.
Windows range from the smallest of square portholes to wall-sized cinematic expanses of glass, as seen in the dining room.
Despite its dark and boxy exterior, the house's interior is bright, naturally lit, and spacious. Adjaye, a master of the well-placed window, is in top form here. The staircase ascends toward sunlight.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.