29547 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Master bedroom
Living
Dining room w view toward living and master bedroom
Dining, cat
Kitchen
Living room w multi-purpose storage wall
Front door
Entry courtyard
Street view
Exterior view
When Melbourne-based studio Biasol was tapped to design the interiors of a cafe in Chengdu, the capital of China's Sichuan province, the design firm studied the director's singular aesthetic sense, and The Grand Budapest Hotel in particular. The appropriately named Budapest Cafe unfolded into a fantasy-filled escape—much like Anderson's mythical hotel. Stairs lead to a mezzanine level that provides a view from above, while a decorative staircase leading nowhere is a recurring theme, popping up at the end of the long marble bar, integrated into shelving, and above a faux fireplace.
House in Tokyo is a minimal residence designed by Ako Nagao + miCo for a couple who required a music studio. The site is located between reinforced concrete mid-to-high-rise apartments and an old wooden housing area. The volume needed to be closed and
A perforated-metal staircase in Benjamin Moore’s Flame and built-in cabinetry in various shades of blue highlight Fougeron Architecture’s bold reinvention of a narrow row house in Noe Valley for a couple and their daughter. The stairs emphasize the home’s verticality and opens up what had been a low-ceilinged, dark interior.
An elliptical concrete stair forms the pivot point of each floor of the house, anchoring them to the steep escarpment; the stair also wraps around a lift core that descends, mineshaft-like to link the rest of the house to the garage level.
Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.
A palette of wood, concrete, and painted brick forms a neutral backdrop for Kathryn Tyler’s vintage treasures, including a 

$30 dining table, $3 poster, and a set of 1950s Carl Jacobs Jason chairs she snagged on eBay for $400.
After months spent researching solutions to make her home’s fabric roof functional, Lisa Sette can finally relax.
How a highly productive collaboration among a trio of creative Angelenas—and a good dose of Barragán—turned a dark and beleaguered midcentury house into a family home for the ages. Photo by Lisa Romerein.
To maximize light, Dana opted for white surfaces, from the custom cabinetry to the Silestone countertops. “You can’t put a lemon or a Popsicle down on marble, so we got quartz, which is virtually indestructible,” she says.
Work It

“We wanted to open up the back of the house, but there’s nothing to look at,” says Dana. “So we decided to put something in our yard as a focal point, to create our own view.” The architects came up with a glass-walled studio, which Dana uses as 

her home office. The architects mounted a steel I-beam that spans the yard, with holes drilled at eight-inch intervals for maximum flexibility of use. Right now it’s used for Ikea play equipment, but later they plan to hang a hammock and a movie screen.

ikea.com
A EuroStone countertop structures the open-plan kitchen and dining room, where the family will often gather and play.
The open kitchen and dining area of Romero and Bradford’s LV Home is flooded with natural light. Dining table and chairs by IKEA. Antique jukebox by Wurlitzer.
The LV prototype’s bathroom shows how buyers can vary finish levels according to budget.
The residence is set back a few feet from the site’s edge, allowing more light to flood into neighbors’ windows and leaving space for trees. “The idea was to make a strong gesture to incorporate ideas 

of openness,” Lynch explains. “It’s not just a box if you look at it closely. It’s a series of planes that fit together."
The artwork extends nearly the length of the entire north-facing wall of the living-dining-kitchen area, which overlooks the back courtyard and the garage.
Chicago architect Brad Lynch demolished the 1940s bungalow he’d been sharing with his family for nearly two decades, and in its place built a brick-clad structure that would function as a modern counterpoint to its more traditional neighbors.
2 car garage
The brass sculpture on the gray basalt tile floor is by André Bloc.
The linens by Matteo Los Angeles in the master bedroom were among the fabrics that Mirjana Munetic of Boora selected for the Finleys. The idea was to find neutral tones that would not upstage the views.
“We wanted the exterior to be the artwork,” Ryan says.
A view of the temperate rainforest outdoors.
Reflecting the client and what is most important to them:  a calm, refined composition that belies its more complex nature – perfectly suited to the writer in residence.
The long table accomodates enough room for the client’s business meetings and research materials for writing projects or for guests to use as a breakfast table.
In the master bedroom, Mori custom built a bed with side drawers and lined the space with windows that are outfitted with automatic curtains—both blackout and sheer.
The resident wanted to be able to use the space as a fun gathering place for parties, so Bestor set a DJ booth at the edge of the kitchen. Custom plywood shelving holds vinyl records.
"I put everything that I've always loved into this house," says Tyler—and that includes white tiles edged with gray grout in the bathroom, a design move previous clients had balked at.
A built-in bench by the window is a cozy perch for Tyler. The herringbone flooring looks like wood but is actually man-made.
For the kitchen, Tyler hired David Restorick, a furniture maker and friend, to build an island for storage and to wrap Ikea cabinets with oak for a customized look. He also built a staircase that doubles as display space for Tyler’s vast collection of colorful cookware by the likes of Finel, Copco, Cathrineholm, Jens Quistgaard, and Stig Lindberg.
kitchen, based on original designs by Bruno Taut, around 1927
master bedroom with large foldable bed, redesigned based on historic photographs
2nd bedroom
Bathroom in 1920s style
Staircase
kitchen design, modern comfort hidden + fully applicable
The master suite was fashioned from the house’s original garage in a 1970s renovation.
A 13-foot-long island in the kitchen, finished in the same white terrazzo as the floor, serves as an informal dining area. Bassam replicated the kitchen’s walnut-veneered cabinetry in the study and master bedroom for continuity.
The second-floor bridge that leads to the front door flows from the outside in. “Tractor seat” stools designed by Bassam perch on a floor of pristine white terrazzo.
Bassam (left, with Fellows) hung redwood garage doors that match the house’s exterior.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
A vaulted loft room complete with a typewriter and natural wood furnishings serves as the perfect hidden workspace. The chair is a vintage Cherner chair, the side table is Nanna Ditzel, and the wood lamp is a Muuto Wood model.
Stairs lead up to a small loft-like office that overlooks the meeting room below.
SnapSpace Solutions fabricated the cargotecture building.
Victoria collects paraphernalia from medical catalogs, like the model spine on display in her study (bottom). The chrome Triennale Atomic Orbiter floor lamp is by Robert Sonneman.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.