25533 Home Design Ideas and Photos

The Backyard Lounge and Office is 330 square feet and features windows on all sides.
This low-maintenance home near Brisbane, Australia, exemplifies architect James Grose’s design philosophy based around simple, lightweight construction techniques well suited to the region’s subtropical climate.
Kayak in hand, Tom and Will make a break for the beach.
Bach to the BeachWith authenticity and simplicity as their rallying cry, a Kiwi architect and his wife have built a modern beach house that puts a fresh spin on the local vernacular.
Kate’s father predicted they would never use the crow’s nest–like tower, which is reached by climbing a narrow staircase.
The family spends summers and school vacations at the bach. New Zealand's relatively mild winters mean they use the house year-round.
The 82-foot-long pool gets quite a lot of use by Jeff and Millie, and especially by the kids, who are both on the local swim team.
Kids' Bunk Room
A tall, slender window in front of the sink creates a built in light well, allowing daylight to reflect further inward.
In this house in the Mornington Peninsula in the south of Melbourne, materials like concrete, natural stone, steel and cedar are perfect backdrops for architecture and interior design firm SJB to use bold colors and edgy midcentury furniture.
Though seemingly whimsical and freewheeling, Sottsass was exacting in his designs: He had forbidden the Olabuenagas from repainting the home’s stucco facade, insisting that they let it “metamorph into what it wants to be,” but the couple ultimately decided to restore its faded colors last fall, using new elastomeric Behr paints that were blended to original specifications.
The Baumann family residence in Gowanus, Brooklyn, is all geometry up front, with a rectilinear grid of steel and cypress comprising the structure’s double facade.
The home’s enclosed courtyard sits at “the heart of the structure,” says Baumann, who resides with his wife, Lisa Sardinas, and eight-year-old son, Oskar. “This is clearly the dominant space; everything flexes towards it.” Baumann cast the square concrete floor tiles himself, enlisting the help of his son. A small, neat patch of grass—a playful nod to the archetypal domestic lawn—is edited down to a charming folly.
The kitchen opens to the elements thanks to sliding doors from C.R. Laurence. The anigre in the kitchen is the same employed in the master bedroom.
Harper sits on the porch just off the entrance. James notes that the children spend their time “swimming in the dam, feeding the chickens, and riding their ponies or bikes. It’s really just the simple stuff that we had when we grew up in the late ’70s and ’80s.
Entirely off the grid, the house is powered by four photovoltaic panels that supply electricity to lights, small appliances, and water pumps.
For the breezeway, Schwartz used concrete to achieve the feel of a hardscape courtyard. Uma basks beneath the egg-shaped opening.
A maple tree grows through an ipe deck in the garden that Mary Barensfeld designed for a family in Berkeley, California. A reflecting pool separates it from a white-granite patio, which is furnished with a Petal dining table by Richard Schultz and chairs by Mario Bellini.
The trip from garage to first floor is through a wood-clad spiral staircase that resembles a giant slatted barrel.
Steel allowed Kunding to be playful with the staircase’s form.
Arbel’s projects—both products and architectural commissions—follow a chronological numbering system. The house itself is his 23rd design, while the one-of-a-kind glass pendants that accent nearly every room like a starscape are called “28.”
“The house is a piece of origami made out of triangular shapes, which we then draped over the landscape,” says Arbel.
White tiles envelop the en suite master bathroom.
Just off an internal courtyard, a mudroom provides a prime place to keep sneakers. Each family member has their own shelf, backlit by windows that illuminate every pair.
Arbel’s “14” sconces spot the wall to ethereal effect in the master bedroom. “I wanted this place to be habitable. One of my greatest criticisms of modern architecture is that it often forgets to make things cozy.”
Omer Arbel, the creative director at industrial design firm Bocci, was given three parameters when he began designing a home for his colleague Randy Bishop: Create a “profound” connection between the internal and external spaces; build only one level; and, most crucially, utilize a wealth of 100-year-old beams salvaged from a series of warehouses owned by Bishop’s ancestors.
Atop the carport is a Hopper table and shade by Extremis.
In the living room, guests gather on a matching ebony sofa and daybed from Hudson and a pair of Jorge Zalszupin lounge chairs. An Yves Klein coffee table—filled with the artist’s signature International Klein Blue pigment— provides a vivid burst amid otherwise organic tones. The walnut-and-bronze cabinetry is a custom design.
Resident Elizabeth Twaddell enjoys the weather with her daughter Uma outside the guesthouse Neal Schwartz designed for her mother-in-law, Surendra, who frequently visits for extended stays. A concrete driveway forks off from the main house to lead to a covered breezeway, sited between the new 775-square-foot structure and a two-car garage.
Graham Hill, a sustainability advocate whose TED talks have delved into the benefits of living small, put his own lessons into practice at his 350-square-foot apartment, which he shares with his partner and two dogs. Quick transitions, like drawing the FilzFelt curtain, convert the living space into a bedroom.
Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, with project manager and lead designer Emily Kudsen Leland at the helm, remade a Portland abode with a crisp paint palette: Benjamin Moore’s Wrought Iron for the cladding and Venetian Gold for the front door. Landscape design is by Lilyvilla Gardens.
Standing-seam copper siding accentuates sections of the structure that provide shear support for the steel moment frame.
To highlight the existing architecture of the home, Hill 

retained the dark polish of 

the casement windows, which 

she finds enhances period details instead of undermining 

them. In the rear sunroom, the vintage Case Study furniture pieces with Plexiglas bases are from Metro Retro 

in Houston. 

A Bourgie lamp by Kartell is 

atop an old marble end table by Knoll, and the Gan kilim rug pictures a branch motif echoed in the kitchen and breakfast room.
A narrow building next to the main structure houses storage and an outdoor kitchen.
Sitting on the edge of a lake in the Mornington Peninsula, this house by Melbourne-based MA Architects was designed as a series of teak-clad modules with the main living areas in the center and large deck that extends from the living room.
The renovation and two-story extension of this 1880 Adelaide bungalow includes a 23-foot rear lot with a pool.
This 1949 inter-war modernist house in New South Wales was renovated by Sam Crawford Architects, Conway Atkins House in a way that paid homage to it's heritage with nautical and transportation art deco elements.
Architect Prineas remodelled this minimalist residence in Lane Cove, in Sydney’s Lower North Shore, with a rear extension connected to the main house via a small link that creates two internal courtyards. The house had plenty of strategically positioned large windows and skylights that connect it with the tree canopies above it.
Working with his colleagues at Austin Maynard Architects, architect Andrew Maynard added a 184-square-foot, sun-saturated greenhouse extension to his existing 364-square-foot home, and the new space serves as an office for him and his team.
The home of Primo Orpilla and Verda Alexander in Orinda, in the hills east of Berkeley, California has a corridor with full glass walls and flat, glass roof and plenty of rooms that let sunlight in from many angles.
Danish blogger, Tikkie Elsøe, chose mint green
Residents are allowed a small swatch of land to plant gardens.
During construction, Mariscal’s team adjusted the design to accommodate the boughs of an old pine tree in the backyard. The unique detail imbues the home with a spirit of wabi-sabi—or beauty through imperfection.
Protected by an overhang, and floating above ground level, this tertiary space is known in traditional homes as the "engawa." To sustain a unified look throughout, the floor and ceiling are clad in ipe wood.
At the client’s request the kitchen contains neither upper cabinets (Shino can’t reach them) nor an oven (they only used the old one once—to reheat a pizza). A modular Roche Bobois Mah Jong sofa adds a decorative flourish to the living area while maintaining as low a profile as the traditional Japanese furniture.
The couple asked for a “no maintenance, not low maintenance” backyard. However, Shino tends to “Carlsbad's largest public bathroom for cats” (otherwise known as their Japanese-style rock garden) about once a month.

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Below a twisting steel staircase sits a stool from the impossibly rare 1967 Girard Group for Herman Miller (it was only produced for one year). Stevens rennovated the home from top to bottom, including the Japanese-style fence in the garden.
Architect Grant explains that the recessed orange wall with built-in storage shelving is a counterpoint to the view of Boston in the opposite direction.
In Montara, California, architect Michael Maltzan designed a home for, his sister and 

brother-in-law. From certain vantage points, the home’s unique angles result in M.C. Escher–like optical illusions.
Guests ascend a staircase into the cabin, while a small lift carries up their luggage.
Sasha samples berries at the island while Wes, perched on the counter next to Deborah, clutches the whipped cream—similar in color to the backsplash, made of traditional Moroccan tiles and available through Emory & Cie.
The housees that circle San Francisco's Buena Vista Park run the gamut from wedding-cake Victorian to Scandinavian modern. Architect Cass Calder Smith aimed to create a façade that contextually relates to the adjacent ornate ones yet is purely modern.
Rimrock | Olson Kundig
An Almond bathtub by Porcelanosa is accented by a tub filler from Hansgrohe.
The loft is a private oasis for daydreaming.
The kitchen looks out to woodland views.
The living area and a study corner.
"The loft is deliberately made dark. When you are in the dark, but close to something bright, your focus goes away from your own situation towards that bright situation," says Austigard.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.