22122 Home Design Ideas and Photos

The top-floor bar Waydown features panoramic skyline views of the Chicago Loop.
Polished-steel tubing, perforated brass, plywood, and linoleum make up the building blocks of the interiors. Simple, straightforward, and thoughtful materials evoke Mies Van De Rohe’s work at the Illinois Institute of Technology.
Each room comes with a unique piece of art on letterhead stationery that's painted or hand-drawn by a student at the Chicago Art Institute.
The home is now available to rent via OneFineStay. In the main home, extensive sheets of glass, from the living room to the principal bedroom, frame views to the private backyard and tiled pool. White oak built-ins and kitchen cabinets complement the original tongue-and-groove ceiling and contrast with stained concrete floors. Bright accents—delivered via the citrus green cabinetry in the bathroom and indigo Heath tile in the kitchen, as well as books and furnishings throughout—bring warmth and playful color.
Built-in concrete shelves in one of the guest bedrooms.
Exposed concrete is used for the rail-less stairs.
Layered concrete walls and ceilings add a raw masculinity to the interiors.
The large outdoor terraces make the outdoors a major part of the house's design.
Kiri wood walls help keep the bedroom cool.
From the master bedroom, the owners can look out to a lake that's part of the golf course.
A streamlined kitchen with a concrete slab countertop.
Elegant, cream and white colored sofa and chairs, and wood details compliment the raw concrete fitouts beautifully.
A jacuzzi bathtub that looks out fo views of the neighborhood.
A guest bedroom that's partially submerged in the dunes.
The varied heights of the volumes create interesting interior perspectives.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
The lobby and all of 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge’s interiors were designed by INC Architecture & Design in partnership with Starwood Capital Group. And for however beautiful the lobby is, the rooms are the place you don’t want to leave. In the case of our visit—a family of four spending three nights at the hotel—that’s saying something since we stayed in the Skyline 2 Beds room, which offers two double beds. After the first night, we wished we’d been able to upgrade to a suite: Two people in a double bed does not make for the best sleep, even if it’s on a hemp-blend mattress wrapped in organic cotton sheets. But we consoled ourselves by opening our massive sliding door, nestling into the built-in seating area that’s covered in nubby textiles and gazing out at the view of the Statue of Liberty. "Every room has a floor-to-ceiling sliding window that opens to that landscape and makes you feel like you’re on a balcony," Marvel says.
It’s hard to take your eyes and mind off the Statue of Liberty, considering the current political landscape, but there’s also a bird's-eye view of the park’s voluminous tree tops. We forced ourselves to leave the comfort of our room and wander in Brooklyn Bridge Park, where we discovered Anish Kapoor’s public art installation titled Descension. The artwork is a thing of great beauty and strength that took our minds right back to political chaos. But we kept walking until we found Jane’s Carousel and witnessed a diverse sea of beaming toddler faces going around and around on brilliant and fantastic animals—a hope-restoring site.
Inside, the hotel’s lobby is marked by a massive living wall created by landscape architecture firm Harrison Green. Many of the furnishings for the space are made by Brooklyn artisans and were crafted using locally sourced materials. "There’s a large pine table made with reclaimed pine beams from the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn," says designer Waad El Hadidy, of Starwood Capital Group, the company that developed the hotel with Toll Brothers City Living. "The art piece behind the reception desk is by Brooklyn artist Jarrod Beck. It’s made with rubber roof membrane he collected in Utica, New York, after a tornado destroyed homes there in 2014." Another artwork—comprised of 6,000 pounds of hammered and shaped obsidian rocks and hand-dyed, rust-colored rope—by Rachel Mica Weiss is situated near the bottom of the lobby’s main staircase.
The rooftop pool and bar lured us back to the hotel. We couldn’t wait to experience more mind-blowing views of the New York surround while laying poolside in the sun. It’s a perch that can’t be beat in terms of the eyeful you get, but the views are so epic they dwarf the already small three-feet-deep plunge pool that seemed to be there mostly for standing in while taking selfies. But our kids swam and splashed in the water while we ordered from the rooftop bar menu—a lobster roll, a hamburger, French fries with tarragon aioli, a Dark and Stormy and more than one glass of Quinn Vins de Pays des Maures Rose.
"We are a ‘little slice of heaven’ for any architecture, interior design, and midcentury modern aficionado," says Beckmann. The units are available for rent through Boutique Homes.
Beckmann and Trowbridge are the co-owners of this resort-style property, which they started working on eight years ago. They describe their unique architectural project as a "micro-resort—a hybrid between luxury rental and boutique hotel."
Beckmann and Trowbridge have recently expanded The Lautner to create The Lautner Compound, which includes The Lautner, The Park—a 10,000-square-foot open-air event space—and a newly acquired 1957 Californian bungalow called The Ranch House. All the buildings and facilities on the compound were masterfully restored and furnished to reflect the spirit of Lautner.
The roomy kitchen offers all the comforts of home.
Modern yurts haven’t abandoned this consideration of the spiritual—just ask Adrian Larralde, an entrepreneur who designed and built a mountaintop yurt just outside Santa Barbara, California. Now available to rent through Glamping Hub, the yurt began as a personal project. Entranced by yurts and the serene experience of being in them, Larralde enlisted his father, a general contractor, to help build one on the family’s site on Refugio Mountain, overlooking the Channel Islands. The area, Larralde says, boasts a rich history.
The main bedroom has a generous closet and outdoor access.
The smaller bedroom is tucked behind a partition for privacy.
The customized yurt, attached hut, and porch are perched atop Refugio Mountain for stunning views.
The master suite captures Neutra’s original vision, with a generous walk-in island closet and a terrazzo bath with sunken tub, steam shower, and dual vanity.
The living room includes a fireplace and hidden wet bar.
Bertram retained Neutra’s open floor plan and minimalist aesthetic—soft white tones contrast with the dark slate geometric flooring.
The kitchen opens to the dining area and living room.
Ash cabinetry and stainless steel appliances in the kitchen and living room.
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
A new dining area off the garden,
The addition is clad in contemporary-looking fritted glass and shou sugi ban—rustic charred wood—by Delta Millworks. Both materials contrast with the historic stonework of the original building.
Kitchen & Dining table
Wardrobe, door, TV unit
Entrance
Livingroom
bedroom
Master bedroom
Livingroom

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.