In a truly unique collaboration, the client and home owner, Brian Schipper, lead the design effort for this incredible home. He chose to task Lucid Architecture with the role of Architect of Record to ensure that his vision and all of the design details were executed with the highest degree of clarity and finish.

Brian, well versed in Mid Century Modern design and living, directed all design aspects of this project to ensure everything (right down to the curtain pleats) truly embodies classic Mid Century Modern style and detail. After abandoning an earlier less purely modern design, the floor plan for the home was drawn by Brian on a rainy Saturday while living in San Francisco. He located the structure around six 160 year-old white and red oak trees that were preserved on the site, and took advantage of a building location established by a previous existing structure on the site. To continue the in-town living style that Brian and his husband have enjoyed on the porch of their 1908 Arts and Crafts house located a block away, the streetward edge of the home was pushed forward on the site to maintain the built edge of the existing streetscape.

A rigorous 8’ structural grid defined the organization in which the client’s plan took shape. Conceptually, the home is divided into two zones. The public living spaces are open to the street in the south zone, and the private spaces are located north zone in the rearward part of the home. Exterior walls are either glass or vertical cedar infilled between the structural framing, carefully chosen based on function within. The skin of the home is clad with solid cedar wall panels, or transparent floor to ceiling glass wall panels inserted between the 8’ structural grid. The cantilevered roof dramatically reaches out to shelter the house as well as outdoor areas and entryways. The informal orientation of the entrance, screened porch, large open kitchen and garage are intended to encourage casual spontaneous interactions with friends and family.

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Modern home with Exterior, Metal Siding Material, Wood Siding Material, House, Flat RoofLine, and Glass Siding Material. The cantilevered roof dramatically reaches out to shelter the house as well as outdoor areas and entryways. Photo  of Pleasant Street ResidenceView Photos

The cantilevered roof dramatically reaches out to shelter the house as well as outdoor areas and entryways.

Modern home with Exterior, Metal Siding Material, Flat RoofLine, Mid-Century Building Type, Wood Siding Material, House, and Glass Siding Material. The mostly transparent street elevation gives a glimpse into the home, while the fireplace feature wall provides privacy to the rear spaces.  The structural grid is expressed at the exterior with black cladding wrapped onto the steel frame between the wall panels.  A continuous band of clerestory windows wraps the entire home and gives the roof a floating feel. Photo 2 of Pleasant Street ResidenceView Photos

The mostly transparent street elevation gives a glimpse into the home, while the fireplace feature wall provides privacy to the rear spaces. The structural grid is expressed at the exterior with black cladding wrapped onto the steel frame between the wall panels. A continuous band of clerestory windows wraps the entire home and gives the roof a floating feel.

Modern home with Living Room, Coffee Tables, Concrete Floor, Accent Lighting, Wood Burning Fireplace, Sofa, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, and Console Tables. The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA. Photo 5 of Pleasant Street ResidenceView Photos

The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.

Modern home with Kitchen, Concrete Floor, Ice Maker, Range Hood, Wall Oven, Granite Counter, Recessed Lighting, Ceramic Tile Backsplashe, Microwave, Refrigerator, Wine Cooler, Ceiling Lighting, Undermount Sink, Cooktops, Dishwasher, Wood Cabinet, and Range. With ample natural light and a hidden pantry, the Sapele kitchen serves as well as it entertains. Photo 6 of Pleasant Street ResidenceView Photos

With ample natural light and a hidden pantry, the Sapele kitchen serves as well as it entertains.

Modern home with Exterior, Mid-Century Building Type, Wood Siding Material, House, Glass Siding Material, Metal Siding Material, and Flat RoofLine. The 6’ cantilevered overhang provides ample shelter for weather and shading from the midday summer sun.  Careful detailing ensured perfect alignment between the soffit and interior ceiling, as well as floor to ceiling windows. Photo 8 of Pleasant Street ResidenceView Photos

The 6’ cantilevered overhang provides ample shelter for weather and shading from the midday summer sun. Careful detailing ensured perfect alignment between the soffit and interior ceiling, as well as floor to ceiling windows.

Modern home with Exterior, House, Flat RoofLine, Wood Siding Material, Mid-Century Building Type, Metal Siding Material, and Glass Siding Material. The mostly transparent street elevation gives a glimpse into the home, while the fireplace feature wall provides privacy to the rear spaces.  The structural grid is expressed at the exterior with black cladding wrapped onto the steel frame between the wall panels.  A continuous band of clerestory windows wraps the entire home and gives the roof a floating feel. Photo 9 of Pleasant Street ResidenceView Photos

The mostly transparent street elevation gives a glimpse into the home, while the fireplace feature wall provides privacy to the rear spaces. The structural grid is expressed at the exterior with black cladding wrapped onto the steel frame between the wall panels. A continuous band of clerestory windows wraps the entire home and gives the roof a floating feel.

Architect
Interior Design
  • Brian Schipper
Landscape Design
  • Rick Lord
Structure
  • House (Single Residence)
  • Style
  • Midcentury
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