Dwell's Favorite 67 Outdoor Large Patio, Porch, Deck Design Photos And Ideas

The stunning retreat is centered around a serene swimming pool with natural stone touches.
The homeowners wanted a space to accommodate their interests: gardening, looking after their ducks, or relaxing in the shade provided by the canopy of trees on the property.
The living area, which is connected to an outdoor terrace, provides ample room for entertaining.
The roof terrace is conceived as a large exterior room, delimited by walls and windows that frame the fantastic views of the Monterrey mountains.
In this view, one can see how the curved addition makes space for an outdoor seating area with a fire pit, and eventually meets the clapboard form of the original house.
In contrast to the industrial neighborhood, the views from the upper-level deck look directly into the canopies of surrounding established trees.
At the rear patio is a kitchen, dining area, and an Ipe-wood deck with a fire pit, lounge seats, and a water feature.
The home’s undulating roof, composed of exposed wood beams and plywood sheathing, references the rolling terrain. A Cor-Ten steel–clad outdoor fireplace was built by BRD Construction; the same material was used for the interior fireplace, as surround on some windows, as cladding for the garage door, and on the chimney. The lounge chairs are from the Finn Collection from Design Within Reach. Tim Kirby of Surface Design Inc. tackled  the site’s landscape architecture.
-
Leelanau County, Michigan
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Unable to alter the footprint of the building, the Deams created a backyard living area that nearly doubled the home's living space.
Located on the western Danish coast within walking distance of the North Sea, this home was designed by Soren Sarup to integrate elements of the surrounding landscape and to highlight natural, contemporary beauty. The interior fuses clean-lined simplicity, an abundance of wood surfaces, and a restrained mix of Danish-modern and vintage furniture to create a visually stimulating yet relaxing environment that extends between indoor and outdoor living spaces.
Though the fire pit was “kind of an after-thought,” says Hannah, the family uses it year-round. “In the spring and fall, it warms you up on cool nights, and in the summer, it just adds ambience.”
The engawa deck is a traditional Japanese feature. It's a place where guests are often greeted to sit with a casual cup of tea. The David and Mayuko also uses it as a viewing porch toward the back yard for when the kids play in the grass.
The spruce panels that coat the second-floor exterior will fade in tandem with the zinc-coated steel that rims the glazed windows and doors. "They will go gray like we do," says Claesson.
Until Sasseen took ownership, the ground at the back of the house was sheathed in concrete. She created a softer environment when she replaced it with bluestone and planted beach grass that rustles in the ocean breeze.
Even in cold weather, they open the sliding doors to let the fresh air in.
Four-year-old Ian plays in the courtyard, which is the center of family life in warmer months.
Thanks to Matthew Hufft, their envelope-pushing architect and longtime friend, Hannah and Paul Catlett have a new home in southwestern Missouri that’s a fresh, unconventional take on the traditional farmhouse.
Harper sits on the porch just off the entrance. James notes that the children spend their time “swimming in the dam, feeding the chickens, and riding their ponies or bikes. It’s really just the simple stuff that we had when we grew up in the late ’70s and ’80s."
From the deck you really get a sense of the two main volumes of the house. One faces inward and the other out, a fine representation of Boone's ideas about the division between work space and living space.
The 82-foot-long pool gets quite a lot of use by Jeff and Millie, and especially by the kids, who are both on the local swim team.
For the breezeway, Schwartz used concrete to achieve the feel of a hardscape courtyard. Uma basks beneath the egg-shaped opening.
This 1949 inter-war modernist house in New South Wales was renovated by Sam Crawford Architects, Conway Atkins House in a way that paid homage to it's heritage with nautical and transportation art deco elements.
The couple asked for a “no maintenance, not low maintenance” backyard. However, Shino tends to “Carlsbad's largest public bathroom for cats” (otherwise known as their Japanese-style rock garden) about once a month.

Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
Rimrock | Olson Kundig
Cedar slats mark the facade of the Worple's lakefront vacation home in Ontario.
CAUCASO
Dining with a Scandinavian touch: Archi dining chair combined with Carver table.
Architect Craig Steely designed this house for himself, his wife Cathy Liu, a painter, and their son, Zane, that looks out to the Pacific Ocean from a lava flow on the big island of Hawaii.
Two-year-old Annika and five-year-old Soren make music on the "nap swing," a popular hangout spot for kids and adults alike.
Paola Gracia keeps an eye on Kata, one of the couple’s schnauzers, from the second- story balcony. In the shade below the balcony is the dogs’ house, meant to mimic the Gracias’, that architect Jorge Gracia built from leftover building materials.
In fall, the color of this backyard in Charlottesville, Virginia, changes daily with the foliage. Elizabeth Birdsall marvels how new outdoor spaces on her property, like a patio furnished with upholstered seating from Gloster, make enjoying the woods an easy experience: “It’s like comfortable camping, all the time.”
A custom table surrounded by NET’s Museo chairs and poplar stools provides a space for the Sarmiento Tovo boys, Manuel, 5, and Julián, 3, to play with the toys their mother makes.
The courtyard acts like an outdoor living room, where the Arnolds’ daughter, Josie, plays freely, safe from nearby traffic. The family dines here most of the year at the custom-designed wood-and-steel table. The picnic table set reappropriates the century-old eucalyptus tree that once grew on the site.
Wright and Keffer (standing) hang out on their deck with Bolander, who lives just across the road. The chairs, designed by Bolander, are upholstered in Sunbrella fabric.
Another view of the deck.
Outside on the deck, one-year-old Mary and three-year-old Finbar enjoy a snack at the kid-size table and chairs Michael designed and made for them.
Resident Brian Whitlock saved some serious cash by taking on much of the construction work himself. By wiring his house himself, he saved around $30,000. “People have a visceral fear of electricity, which is healthy in some ways,” he says. “But I think it gets a bad rap.”
The clients cite Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mrs. Clinton Walker House in Carmel, California, as a very loose inspiration for the design of their house. From the deck off the kitchen and living area, Miha, nine years old, takes in an uninterrupted view of the Pacific Ocean.
The expansive decks and patios enable indoor/outdoor living and easy entertaining.
In ARCHITECTUREFIRM’s James River House, the 28-foot-long Series 600 Multi-Slide door is comprised of five 10-foot-tall panels of dual-paned, low-E glass, which helps keep the house warm during Virginia winters. All windows and doors feature thermally broken aluminum. “Western Window Systems,” says architect Danny MacNelly, “does a great aluminum product that isn’t very expensive. The details are minimal, clean, and refined.”
Operable timber shutters and screens offer protection from extreme weather. Zoning the house into three distinct masses creates a partly sheltered courtyard to make this year-round blending of the indoors and outdoors possible.
The screen around the lanai is made from extrene, a material used by the military for radio towers. The welded-steel sculpture, set atop a pile of a’a rocks, was made by Craig.
Preservation Props

Since the house is in a historic district, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, 

a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people 

to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.”

beebeskidmore.com

capital-lumber.com
A third-floor courtyard stands in for a backyard and gives Elodie, the couple’s two-year-old daughter, a place to play outdoors. A Hunting chair by Børge Mogensen shares the space with a child’s chair by 

Tomii Takashi and a vintage Danish coffee table.
The guesthouse hovers above the motor court. “The main area was broken up into four zones: the kids wing, the guest suite, the master suite, and the living-dining room and kitchen, which is a transition area, where public meets private,” says Hawkins.
The west patio
The west patio opens up to a grass area that can be enjoyed by many.
Abernathy House
Concrete floors and roof contrast with large expanses of glazing.
Cloaked House, as 3r Ernesto Pereira named it, blends into its hillside location.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.