Dwell's Favorite 140 Outdoor Large Patio, Porch, Deck Design Photos And Ideas

The outdoor living space of the Birch Le Collaboration House features a wood-burning fireplace under large, covered porch.
The Plus House—named for the perpendicular trajectories of light and air that pass through on the top and bottom floors—is one in a series of architect-designed homes commissioned by Arkitekthus, a development company founded five years ago with a pledge to improve the quality of prefab architecture. The spruce panels that coat the second-floor exterior will fade in tandem with the zinc-coated steel that rims the glazed windows and doors. "They will go gray like we do," says architect Claesson Koivisto Rune.
In the wintertime, the living room is cozy and welcoming with its large fireplace and warm lighting.
The upper floor terrace is the same width as the living room and kitchen. Large glass doors offer the opportunity to open the living room completely to the terrace.
A fully glazed wall—which incorporates both louvres and sliding doors—connects the dining room and kitchen to the deck and garden. The natural slope of the site replaces the need for a fence between the garden and the beach.
A monolithic opening in the facade provides an entrance from the exterior into the courtyard. The property's extensive landscaping was completed by George Girvin, with outdoor lighting by designer Pamela Burton.
Luciano Kruk perforates a concrete volume with glass walls to fashion a simple yet elegant vacation home in the province of Buenos Aires. On a quiet lot populated with aged pinewood, Luciano Kruk designed a modest vacation home for three sisters and their families. The 807-square-foot, two-level home is ensconced in its forest setting. The firm employed board-formed concrete inside and out to connect the building with its environment. "Pine planks were used to set the formwork so that the partitions, as well as the slabs, would preserve the texture of the wood veins in an attempt to establish a harmonious dialogue with the bark of the local trees," said the firm.
“The steeply sloping site provides three unique spaces—the living attic, the pool deck, and the garden terrace.”
The house is broken up so that the natural site flows through the courtyard, which has a fire pit and a hot tub.
"A well-performing house extension facing south on a small inner-city block built in rammed earth is not easy to achieve," said Welsch. "However, in this challenge was our opportunity: We decided that our extension will curl around to capture the sun, creating a communal courtyard and allowing the occupants to look at their own house rather than a paling fence."
The backyard is one of this home’s best features. With a lot that nearly equals the square footage of the home itself, there was plenty of room to play with landscaping.
The guesthouse hovers above the motor court. "The main area was broken up into four zones: the kids wing, the guest suite, the master suite, and the living-dining room and kitchen, which is a transition area, where public meets private," says Hawkins.
Sherbanuk (left) and Campbell sit by the outdoor fireplace, which adjoins the screened-in porch.
Like a lantern in the night, the cabin glows in its wooden setting once the sun goes down.
In the rear courtyard, Steve spent three days demolishing a rock grotto, which had been installed in the 1970s, with a jackhammer. Its boulders found new life as hardscaping near the pool. “I’m glad we could repurpose those boulders,” Jessy says, “I hate adding to landfill.”
Edward Ogosta Architecture renovates and extends a Californian dwelling, creating a breezy, light-filled home for a family of five.
Concrete stairs lead from the kitchen to the pool area. A peekaboo perforated screen crafted from black metal allows guests to see the activity unfolding inside.
At the heart of the home is a large, open-air courtyard that brings the wild landscape into the home with native landscaping. The greenery continues on the home's flat roofs.
In the Norwegian town of Larvik in Vestfold County, Oslo-based practice Lund Hagem Architects renovated a summer cabin on a rocky terrain with generous outdoor patios that take advantage of dramatic coastal views.
Serizzo white granite flooring features in the outdoor wraparound terraces.
The view from Longchamp Outdoor Living's ipe pool deck. Clark Richardson Architects designed the multi-use space to be perfect all year long.
The South Elevation provides complete transparency through the main level to established gardens beyond
Inspired by the surrounding landscape of chestnut trees, rocky hillside, and bubbling stream, Portuguese architecture firm 3r Ernesto Pereira chose to blend into, and take advantage of, the local geography rather than fight against it at this sleek, modern home near the coastal city of Porto. At a cost of €100,000 (approximately $125,000) and measuring about 140 square meters, this stunning, wood-and-glass retreat took about four months to construct.
“We had these incredible live oak trees, and so we built the house around the trees and the view,” says Raike.
Glass doors open the home to an expansive wooden deck overlooking gorgeous Alpine views.
Built to go off the grid, this remote beachside cottage can open up completely to the outdoors with its series of movable wall-sized glass panels and screens. Designed by Herbst Architects, the modest New Zealand bach comprises two rectangular pavilions built with mostly natural materials chosen for their durability, texture, and weathering characteristics.
Stone stairs on the perimeter of a main courtyard ascend to a rooftop garden. Large windows on the other side of the living area overlook an enclosed water feature with a statue of a monk.
The living room takes advantage of the Californian climate, opening completely to the deck adjoining two indoor/outdoor wings.
The water-resistant ipe wood deck wraps around two existing trees.
A cement slab and wood deck offer space for meals and stargazing. Sam built the furniture himself.
The minimalist exterior is defined by the flat roof, overhanging eaves, a and ribbon-like band of glass windows.
The 1908 greenhouse from the Lyndsay Mansion has been repurposed into a dining pavilion. During the restoration, it was revealed that Soriano had perfectly arranged the home to line up with the original greenhouse.
"The brief was to efficiently and cost effectively transform a light-starved weatherboard into an open and modern home with a good connection to the rear garden and a relaxed yet refined feel," says the firm. The owner charred and oiled the shiplapped cypress siding himself.
"After photographing the house, we all sat down around the servery over a glass (or two) of wine and shared travel experiences, building industry war stories, and discussed the renovation," says the firm. "It was very gratifying to hear and see that the space really fit the clients well. The space was comfortable, laid-back, and yet worldly, just like the clients themselves."
Teak furniture, sourced from Teak Warehouse, adds a fitting lightness to the patio.
A 3,000-liter rainwater harvesting tank is located beneath the rear deck, which is made from spotted gum with an oiled finish.
In the snug rear lounge, the banquettes are fitted with upholstery made by local artisans.
Architecture firm Bromley Caldari transformed a cramped beach house into a spacious vacation getaway filled with natural light and views.
This 3,200-square-foot structure was assembled with a prefabricated foundation, concrete panel siding, and efficient built-ins, minimizing construction debris and toxins—such as concrete foundation tar—on the site.
This home's prefabricated components were all made in Marmol Radziner’s home-building factory near Los Angeles, and trucked over to the one-and-a-half-acre site.
See Arch refinished the soffit cladding and deck while making repairs as necessary.
See Arch restored the exterior fireplace wall and painted it a deep blue hue to match the repainted blue timber cladding.
Kay’s timeless, Scandinavian-style teak frame gives a nod to the classic French cane wicker—making it at home in both traditional and contemporary settings.
The glass and wood walls of the bathhouse, like other retractable panels on the house, 

offer shade with a view.
The new, protected deck frames the views, and also has a built-in bench and Electrolux grill, with a mosaic tile backsplash.
The garden has been prepared with electrical and plumbing services in case they are required for the future installation of a summer house.
The addition increased the floor area of the single-level house to 2,228 square feet.
At Cuadra San Cristóbal, the water feature serves three purposes: as a drinking fountain for horses, as a reflection pond, and as a swimming pool for horses.
A Cuadra San Cristóbal courtyard surrounded by vibrant pink walls.
Water is featured in most of Barragán's work as a sensory element. Here, a fountain and a large pool provide a sound barrier and a place for reflection.
Before his passing in 1988, Barragán left instructions to recreate the paint colors carefully selected for his projects. They often involve mixtures of several colors, as these shades were not widely used at the time the home was built.
Cuadra San Cristóbal by Luis Barragán
Cuadra San Cristóbal by Luis Barragán

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.