Dwell's Favorite 117 Outdoor Shrubs Design Photos And Ideas

In the backyard, there is a laneway structure that is partially clad in the same shingles as the main house. Brian and Karen rent the outbuilding to a tenant. Measured collaborated with Aloe Designs on the landscaping.
In the wintertime, the living room is cozy and welcoming with its large fireplace and warm lighting.
A fully glazed wall—which incorporates both louvres and sliding doors—connects the dining room and kitchen to the deck and garden. The natural slope of the site replaces the need for a fence between the garden and the beach.
The Phoenix home of designers and builders Sarah Swartz Wessel and Ethan Wessel sits amid desert-friendly trees and plants. The couple bought the property in 1998 and worked on the house for a decade. Juxtaposed with limestone floors, wood-beamed ceilings, and walls of hand-troweled plaster and board-formed concrete, glass is strategically placed throughout the 4,000-square-foot expanse to frame slivers of landscape and sky or open wide to reveal gardens of various sizes, which the couple also designed.
A maple tree grows through an ipe deck in this garden that Mary Barensfeld designed for a family in Berkeley, California. A reflecting pool separates it from a granite patio, which is furnished with a Petal dining table by Richard Schultz and chairs by Mario Bellini. The 1,150-square-foot garden serves as an elegant transition from the couple’s 1964 Japanese-style town house to a small, elevated terrace with views of San Francisco Bay. Filigreed Cor-Ten steel fence screens—perforated with a water-jet cutter to cast dappled shadows on a bench and the ground below—and zigzagging board-formed concrete retaining walls are examples.
“The steeply sloping site provides three unique spaces—the living attic, the pool deck, and the garden terrace.”
The backyard is one of this home’s best features. With a lot that nearly equals the square footage of the home itself, there was plenty of room to play with landscaping.
The home's abundance of glass creates a peaceful dialogue between the indoors and outdoors.
Concrete stairs lead from the kitchen to the pool area. A peekaboo perforated screen crafted from black metal allows guests to see the activity unfolding inside.
At the heart of the home is a large, open-air courtyard that brings the wild landscape into the home with native landscaping. The greenery continues on the home's flat roofs.
Giant oak trees dominate, and offer coveted shade, in the courtyard.
"Overall, the lot was flat and grassy with a few beautiful trees," Lum says. "We nestled the house among the heritage redwood tree and the other mature oaks on the property."
“The darker, midnight blue exterior paint color was used on all of the existing building elements to create more of a dynamic contrast with the new structure, which was painted white," says Ryan. Tomatoes, little gem lettuce, green beans, a tobacco plant, and a few strawberry bushes (tended by the kids) grow in the courtyard.
Beyond the large, pivoting wooden gate lies the front entry.
Perched on a 5,556-square-foot lot, the home offers a multitude of outdoor seating areas amongst a number of mature trees, providing a serene escape from the city.
Saddle Peak Residence by AUX Architecture
The outdoor atrium of Family House Litvínovice is a completely private space that's well-suited for the installation of a hammock, outdoor bath, or shower. A11 designed the home to be an exploration of minimalism and privacy from the outside world.
Located in Aarhus, Denmark, Villa R is a minimalist, serene structure clad in zinc panels. "The objective was to create a house that brings the forest inside through large glass panels—and create an ever-changing seasonal backdrop for the interior living spaces," stated the architecture firm, C.F. Møller, of the 3,200-square-foot abode.
The South Elevation provides complete transparency through the main level to established gardens beyond
A 26-foot-wide, 3-ton airport glass hangar door opens the living room to the Atlantic Ocean. The enormous structure was custom-made for the home, designed to raise at the touch of a button to let the ocean breeze permeate every corner of the home.
The asymmetrical, angular forms of the roofs create a dramatic interior filled with light from clerestory windows and high ceilings.
“We had these incredible live oak trees, and so we built the house around the trees and the view,” says Raike.
Throughout the day, light animates the limestone walls to various effects. “As the sun rotates around and is more oblique to the texture of the stone, it casts these wonderful shadows on it,” says Raike. “And you just get a real appreciation for the texture of the stone and the richness of the colors in it.”
All doors open up to the central courtyard of this single-story home.
Wood decking extends out to the yard.
Outside, a triangular saltwater pool overlooks breathtaking views.
Stone stairs on the perimeter of a main courtyard ascend to a rooftop garden. Large windows on the other side of the living area overlook an enclosed water feature with a statue of a monk.
Water features pepper the gardens throughout.
A private terrace is an extension of the interior living spaces. A canopy provides protection while not interrupting the surrounding vistas.
A cement slab and wood deck offer space for meals and stargazing. Sam built the furniture himself.
The minimalist exterior is defined by the flat roof, overhanging eaves, a and ribbon-like band of glass windows.
The 1908 greenhouse from the Lyndsay Mansion has been repurposed into a dining pavilion. During the restoration, it was revealed that Soriano had perfectly arranged the home to line up with the original greenhouse.
The steel-and-glulam support system forms the covered corridor of the loggia.
Back into the forest, the Pool House is oriented for panoramic views of the valley floor.
The Pool House seen at night.
The windows are Anderson100 Fibrex Windows.
The doors are Fiberglass ThermaTru.
The three attached structures house an office, guest suite, and game room, used by the family to watch football games.
The glass and wood walls of the bathhouse, like other retractable panels on the house, 

offer shade with a view.
The 5,200-square-foot retreat is designed to look like a cluster of old barns upon first glance.
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Taos, New Mexico
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
A courtyard creates visual separation between the main house and the addition.
The retaining wall anchors the standing-seam steel roof.
The garden has been prepared with electrical and plumbing services in case they are required for the future installation of a summer house.
The outdoors are part of the cohesive design, embracing the vegetation, sites, and sunlight.
At Cuadra San Cristóbal, the water feature serves three purposes: as a drinking fountain for horses, as a reflection pond, and as a swimming pool for horses.
Much of the new building and interiors was constructed using natural material: cedar walls and ceiling linings, solid American oak joinery and floorboards, off-form concrete countertops and backsplashes, limestone and bluestone paving, and charred (Yakigugi) silvertop ash cladding.
The four-level, 2,690-square-foot home's oxidized copper elements almost blend into the surrounding greenery.
Beside reduced construction time, SysHaus provides homeowners with a truly sustainable home that arrives at its site 95-percent ready for assembly.
In back, the swimming pool abuts a steep drop-off.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.