Dwell's Favorite 90 Outdoor Grass Design Photos And Ideas

While Falck built most of the tiny home himself, he hired a local carpenter to build the window frame and door.
Durable fiber-cement HardiePlank clads the rear facade.
The homeowners wanted a space to accommodate their interests: gardening, looking after their ducks, or relaxing in the shade provided by the canopy of trees on the property.
This project sparks a conversation about the future of the relationship between urban development and the preservation of natural areas.
Torcuato House Pavilion - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
New addition and patio from outdoor garden: the concrete terrace extends into the garden, and receives daylight over the house from the southern sun.
"The border between inside and outside fades because of the perpetuation of the washed concrete flooring, reminiscent of cannon bases. Just like the shutters of the old barn, the sliding facades of the expansion offer the opportunity to seal off the guest complex entirely," explains Vanhoutte.
A hammock hangs from the sheltered terrace outside the master bedroom.
A sheltered outdoor terrace is located near the heart of the home.
Dusty built the half-pipe for their son Gram's first birthday. It's the cornerstone of the large back yard.
Case Inlet Retreat
The landscaping appears to be based on the mullet principle: business in the front, as seen here (manicured grid lawn, with native vegetation sprouting in careful symmetry), party in the back (sunflowers and wild mountain grass growing in harmonious chaos).
A single crepe myrtle, which sports red blossoms in summer, defines the courtyard.
Located on the western Danish coast within walking distance of the North Sea, this home was designed by Soren Sarup to integrate elements of the surrounding landscape and to highlight natural, contemporary beauty. The interior fuses clean-lined simplicity, an abundance of wood surfaces, and a restrained mix of Danish-modern and vintage furniture to create a visually stimulating yet relaxing environment that extends between indoor and outdoor living spaces.
Karen White, David MacNaughtan, and their sons, Griffin and Finlay, hang out on the front deckof their narrow home in Toronto’s leafy Roncesvalles neighborhood. A narrow modernist composition of glass panes and purple brick, the house slips like a bookmark between two older buildings, a bright three-story abode on a lot narrower than most suburban driveways.  Photo by Dean Kaufman. Read more about the small house here.
Emilio Fuscaldo sits in the garden outside the brick house that he designed for himself and his partner, Anna Krien, on a small subdivided lot in Coburg, a suburb north of Melbourne, Australia. Photo by Nic Granleese.
Though the fire pit was “kind of an after-thought,” says Hannah, the family uses it year-round. “In the spring and fall, it warms you up on cool nights, and in the summer, it just adds ambience.”
Among the first Passive Houses in France, this bamboo-clad farmhouse by the Parisian firm Karawitz Architecture only uses a tenth of the energy a conventionally constructed home does. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.
The engawa deck is a traditional Japanese feature. It's a place where guests are often greeted to sit with a casual cup of tea. The David and Mayuko also uses it as a viewing porch toward the back yard for when the kids play in the grass.
Entry
A Chilean home’s dramatic stained-pine exterior references local vernacular architecture.
Architect Gregory Phillips connected the original house to a new modern extension that doesn’t interfere with the surrounding houses. “I try to be true to the location,”he explains, “so it doesn’t seem like some spaceship has landed.”
The outdoor fire pit.
The courtyard-facing side of the garage provides an overhang for a multifunctional playroom or entertainment space.
As the facade of a Bates Masi-designed home in Water Mill, New York, rises from eight to 14 feet high, the mahogany planks subtly widen. “It was quite a demand to make of the contractor,” architect Paul Masi says. “But the design was so much about traveling through the site and weaving [the house] together with the deck.”
“Before, the house turned its back on the landscape,” said Parish. “This renovation and addition really animates the garden.” Sliding glass doors match those of the living room beyond the deck, and both can be completely open to the yard.
The rooftop courtyard is lined with a verdant mix of indigenous plants, including banana trees, palm trees, lion’s claw, Mexican breadfruit, and native vines. The chaise longues were designed for Farca’s EF Collection.
A mature avocado tree shades the hardscaped patio located just outside the great room.
Entry Bridge
This project also includes a swimming dock.
The family spends summers and school vacations at the bach. New Zealand's relatively mild winters mean they use the house year-round.
Though seemingly whimsical and freewheeling, Sottsass was exacting in his designs: He had forbidden the Olabuenagas from repainting the home’s stucco facade, insisting that they let it “metamorph into what it wants to be,” but the couple ultimately decided to restore its faded colors last fall, using new elastomeric Behr paints that were blended to original specifications.
The home’s enclosed courtyard sits at “the heart of the structure,” says Baumann, who resides with his wife, Lisa Sardinas, and eight-year-old son, Oskar. “This is clearly the dominant space; everything flexes towards it.” Baumann cast the square concrete floor tiles himself, enlisting the help of his son. A small, neat patch of grass—a playful nod to the archetypal domestic lawn—is edited down to a charming folly.
Harper sits on the porch just off the entrance. James notes that the children spend their time “swimming in the dam, feeding the chickens, and riding their ponies or bikes. It’s really just the simple stuff that we had when we grew up in the late ’70s and ’80s.
The renovation and two-story extension of this 1880 Adelaide bungalow includes a 23-foot rear lot with a pool.
Architect Prineas remodelled this minimalist residence in Lane Cove, in Sydney’s Lower North Shore, with a rear extension connected to the main house via a small link that creates two internal courtyards. The house had plenty of strategically positioned large windows and skylights that connect it with the tree canopies above it.
Gregory and Caryn Katz are dwarfed beneath the cantilevered concrete overhang, which houses the bedroom on the upper level. The stackable glass doors that run beneath allow the house to open completely to the yard and swimming pool, soften the severity of the concrete, and blur the boundary between indoors and out.
CAUCASO
CAUCASO
Philippe Starck’s outdoor chairs for Kartell provide cozy fireside seating. These and the sofa version were selected by Salmela. “They’re very much an art form,” he says.
Private garden with deck
From the grass roof patios, the house disappears almost completely, leaving only the landscape, water, and occasional passing orca.
Paola Gracia keeps an eye on Kata, one of the couple’s schnauzers, from the second- story balcony. In the shade below the balcony is the dogs’ house, meant to mimic the Gracias’, that architect Jorge Gracia built from leftover building materials.
When building such a modest structure in a large landscape, designer and client often had to defend their vision to their collaborators. “We knew this house was going to be for Maggie and she would live there alone,” designer Lauren Moffitt says. “But people are always projecting for future resale. Putting in the smallest size of anything—to any subcontractor, it’s just not reasonable.”

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.