Dwell's Favorite 302 Outdoor Design Photos And Ideas - Page 5

Karen White, David MacNaughtan, and their sons, Griffin and Finlay, hang out on the front deck, which lines up next to the neighbors' porch.
In the back, ivy climbs across the garage’s raw cedar cladding next to a gate that allows access to the laneway—but the boys prefer to climb the fence.
Chong left enough space in the 16-foot-wide backyard for a garden and comfortable dining area.
Designed by architect Sebastian Mariscal, the Wabi House in Southern Californian houses serenity inspiring features like a koi pint within its Shou Sugi Ban walls.
A 500-square-foot outdoor space with a grill, a table, and a hammock sits just off the entrance level of the townhouse, offering extra room for dining, relaxing, and entertaining. The corner couch is a custom piece inspired by the large cushions of Moroccan sofas. The Fermob table is paired with Hay Hee dining chairs by Hay.
Architectural designer Sebastian Mariscal and project manager Jeff Svitak created a house in Venice, California, for Michael and Tamami Sylvester. Known as Dwell Home Venice for its role as an exemplification of modern architecture, the house is an homage to indoor-outdoor living. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.
The house is divided into three sections connected by a series of outdoor galleries. “When I walk from one room to another, I have to go outdoors and feel the weather and nature—rain, cold, and sun,” says Sævik. 

Instead of emphasizing the expansive panorama of oak, pine, and aspen trees, the house frames select views—a move inspired by Japanese design.
Lynn
The west patio
The west patio opens up to a grass area that can be enjoyed by many.
This Southern Californian home by architect Sebastian Mariscal has a wabi-sabi spirit, and is built with shou sugi ban timber, has a koi pond, wand a protective overhang, and a tertiary space known in in traditional Japanese homes as the
Fashion designer Josie and her husband Ken Natori are big fans of traditional Japanese architecture, so when Brooklyn-based practice Tsao & McKown Architects designed their home in Pound Ridge, New York, they used a heavy, exposed-timber structure, and included Japanese-style gardens and landscaping.
One-Family Custom Housing: Olson Kundig Architects created this home in Washington's remote Methow Valley as four structures oriented around a central courtyard, each positioned to best enjoy the surrounding vistas in all four seasons.
In 2011, clients Brent Habig and Ana Ecclesthe surveyed the property with architect Jim Cutler, planting stakes at a number of sites. Cutler drew up a different house for each, recalling from his youth the region’s vernacular—especially the crisp white barns nestled into lush green landscapes. They would inspire the form of the couple’s new 2,800-square-foot home. It is designed to capture natural light, but also to cool interiors on hot summer days, using tall, sliding shutters that can cover the two-story home’s windows from floor to ceiling.
Herman describes the shape of a sleeping dragon nestled in the mountains. In keeping with a Feng Shui philosophy, he intentionally left a hole in the building to allow the beast a clear view.
With respect to the sloping meadow, the home is designed to coexist and therefore never breaks the ridgeline.
The Timberleaf can be hauled by a Subaru Outback.
He is fond of telling the story of a large stone table he bought from an antique dealer. When the deliveryman arrived, his truck couldn’t fit through the gate, so Lolo hauled the table into the courtyard himself, inching it into place over several days.
A series of long stairs leads to Maison Amtrak, which is set below street level. The entranceway demonstrates Cohen’s love of Japanese design with a geometric simplicity matched only by the formal elegance of the stained Douglas fir two-by-fours.
Lung Hagem Arkitekter said: "The roof is executed in 270mm thick reinforced concrete with 20mm VIP insulation underneath. The concrete itself is water resistant, thus no additional roofing materials are required. As a result, the roof is a smooth white surface creating a dialogue with the rocky landscape, and giving the cabin its distinctive character."
Abernathy House
Frank Sinatra’s “Twin Palms” Estate
An overhead view of the extension.
Concrete floors and roof contrast with large expanses of glazing.
Cloaked House, as 3r Ernesto Pereira named it, blends into its hillside location.
A peek at the home from a distance.
The dark-stained exterior cladding stands in contrast to the light wood decking and warm interiors.
A courtyard helps isolate the interior of the house visually and acoustically from its urban surroundings, and provides a large opening on the envelope of the house, where light and shadow play enhance the colors and textures of the building throughout the day.
The house sits on a steep site and was positioned below a sandstone crop so as to be concealed from the street. The approach to the house is via a suspended concrete staircase.
A pool and outdoor lounge area that's shaded by trees.
Constructed predominantly with locally quarried stone, steel, poured concrete floors and a turf roof, the horizontal outline of the property harmonizes beautifully with its rugged natural surroundings. The house also has an outdoor terrace with a pool and fireplace, where you can enjoy a cup of tea and take in plenty of fresh air.sd
Deck overlooking Little Round Bay
The kitchen and dining room connect to the courtyard for a breezy, indoor/outdoor environment.
Master Bedroom Porch
The lanai just off the living room and accessible to the kitchen.
The deck and pergola appear to be a natural extension of the home.
The roof's overhang also employs paneled Siberian larch.
Comprised of linked pavilions, the home feels porous and well-connected with nature.
A terrace sits quietly against the water, not quite indoors and not quite outdoors.
The dining area opens to the pool which overlooks the ocean.
Julie and Chris Hill’s home in Austin is built around a pair of massive oak trees, one of which shoots through an ipe deck, past a Loll deck chair, and into a void in the overhanging roof. “The hole also allows light to penetrate deeper into the house,” notes designer Kevin Alter. A limestone brick wall mirrors the curves of the Western red cedar roof, the edges of which are coated in stucco.
A second aperture in the roof is located over the shallow end of the pool. An alfresco dining area, with seating by Kettal, is perched a few steps below.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.