Dwell's Favorite 319 Outdoor Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

Board-formed concrete walls create the core of the house and establish its organic feel. "There’s really no other cast-in-place concrete on the street," says Sarah, "but you don’t even see it until you’ve made it through the front courtyard." There, beneath a deep overhang, the couple designed a jagged pathway cantilevered over a water inside and reflections of light into the sitting area.
Case Inlet Retreat
Rear wall of courtyard
Frontal view of the GOMOS #1
Dining with a Scandinavian touch: Archi dining chair combined with Carver table.
The pool feels as laterally finite as the house feels spacious—but the view goes up forever.
Philippe Starck’s outdoor chairs for Kartell provide cozy fireside seating. These and the sofa version were selected by Salmela. “They’re very much an art form,” he says.
Private garden with deck
The Casa de vidro, shortly after its completion.
Bo Bardi's Casa de vidro, nestled in the jungle of São Paulo.
Designed by Boston-based architect Sebastian Mariscal, this house, which celebrates the best of Californian indoor-outdoor living, was designed to frame views of the trees and the surrounding landscape.
From the grass roof patios, the house disappears almost completely, leaving only the landscape, water, and occasional passing orca.
Six-year-old twins Nicolas and Constanza use Pentimento as their “little battleground,” says Pasternak. “They have some options here that they will not find anywhere else.” Among those options are a climbing wall offering easy access to the roof.
Architect Craig Steely designed this house for himself, his wife Cathy Liu, a painter, and their son, Zane, that looks out to the Pacific Ocean from a lava flow on the big island of Hawaii.
Two-year-old Annika and five-year-old Soren make music on the "nap swing," a popular hangout spot for kids and adults alike.
Paola Gracia keeps an eye on Kata, one of the couple’s schnauzers, from the second- story balcony. In the shade below the balcony is the dogs’ house, meant to mimic the Gracias’, that architect Jorge Gracia built from leftover building materials.
When building such a modest structure in a large landscape, designer and client often had to defend their vision to their collaborators. “We knew this house was going to be for Maggie and she would live there alone,” designer Lauren Moffitt says. “But people are always projecting for future resale. Putting in the smallest size of anything—to any subcontractor, it’s just not reasonable.”
The most sustainable element of all is the Lais’ intention to make their first home their last home as well. “Some people have this mentality of getting a starter house, then upgrading from there,” David says. “We just wanted to find a place to live in and then stay there forever.” Eventually they imagine passing the home down to their children.
In fall, the color of this backyard in Charlottesville, Virginia, changes daily with the foliage. Elizabeth Birdsall marvels how new outdoor spaces on her property, like a patio furnished with upholstered seating from Gloster, make enjoying the woods an easy experience: “It’s like comfortable camping, all the time.”
Lucky Diaz spent three and a half months on this project, working all hours to get it done. “It was worth it,” he says. “To have Ella grow up in an original space is a gift that is beyond measure.”
A custom table surrounded by NET’s Museo chairs and poplar stools provides a space for the Sarmiento Tovo boys, Manuel, 5, and Julián, 3, to play with the toys their mother makes.
Earning the nickname
Set on the edge of Puertos de Beceite national park in Aragon, Spain, and available for vacation rentals, Casa Solo Pezo is a striking concrete square structure set on top of a smaller concrete square bass. Designed by award-winning and MoMA-exhibited Chilean architects at Pezo Von Ellrichshausen, this thoroughly modern residence has proportions and an interior layout that follows those of traditional Mediterranean homes with a strong indoor/outdoor connection.
This three-bedroom villa in the commune of Noto in Sicily has a front portion that’s raised a few feet off the ground and supported by three concrete structures. It's louvered exterior skin can be closed or opened fully, so guests can enjoy views of the sea from a distance.
The architect with his daughters. The redwood strips on the new house were purposely cut to the same width as the horizontal wood siding on the old house to create visual harmony between the two.
The courtyard acts like an outdoor living room, where the Arnolds’ daughter, Josie, plays freely, safe from nearby traffic. The family dines here most of the year at the custom-designed wood-and-steel table. The picnic table set reappropriates the century-old eucalyptus tree that once grew on the site.
The back of the house has sliding doors that open far enough to expose the entire livingroom to the families' back yard.
Gaffney's cousin lives in the house just in front. To give a bit of perspective, this photo was likely taken just feet in front of the waist-high wall that runs between the two houses's yards.
Wright and Keffer (standing) hang out on their deck with Bolander, who lives just across the road. The chairs, designed by Bolander, are upholstered in Sunbrella fabric.
In consultation with the clients, Alterstudio opted to clad the house in local cypress rather than imported, FSC-certified ipe.
Another view of the deck.
The clients insisted that none of the trees on the property be disturbed, so Kevin Alter and his team at Alterstudio Architecture built a deck and an overhang around two of them.
Outside on the deck, one-year-old Mary and three-year-old Finbar enjoy a snack at the kid-size table and chairs Michael designed and made for them.
Resident Brian Whitlock saved some serious cash by taking on much of the construction work himself. By wiring his house himself, he saved around $30,000. “People have a visceral fear of electricity, which is healthy in some ways,” he says. “But I think it gets a bad rap.”
The clients cite Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mrs. Clinton Walker House in Carmel, California, as a very loose inspiration for the design of their house. From the deck off the kitchen and living area, Miha, nine years old, takes in an uninterrupted view of the Pacific Ocean.
The carport screen is dotted with different-size openings, some louvered.
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Austin, Texas
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
A sleek version of the traditional  parrilla, or grill, handcrafted  by Oficios Asociados, has pride  of place on the patio counter.
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Buenos Aires, Argentina
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
The expansive decks and patios enable indoor/outdoor living and easy entertaining.
The home's sci-fi structure seems to hover over the landscape.
Julie and Chris Hill’s home in Austin is built around a pair of massive oak trees, one of which shoots through an ipe deck, past a pair of Loll deck chairs, and into a void in the overhanging roof. “The hole also allows light to penetrate deeper into the house,” notes designer Kevin Alter.
A combination of Alumilex and Marvin windows dot the exterior of a pitched-roof house in North Hatley, Quebec, designed by Lee and Macgillivray Architecture Studio (LAMAS).
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North Hatley, Quebec
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
A small terrace outfitted with an H55 easy chair by Björn Hultén offers a view of the San Francisco Bay.
The bocce court sits between the master bedroom patio and an outdoor dining area featuring Jean-Marie Massaud’s Seashell chairs from Dedon. To bring in natural light while limiting direct exposure, the couple designed a horizontal window for  the music room.
On approach to the guesthouse, the family keeps an edible garden in concrete planters by the property’s landscape designer, Cielo Sichi of Landfour.
Operable timber shutters and screens offer protection from extreme weather. Zoning the house into three distinct masses creates a partly sheltered courtyard to make this year-round blending of the indoors and outdoors possible.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.