Dwell's Favorite 302 Outdoor Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

Located on the western Danish coast within walking distance of the North Sea, this home was designed by Soren Sarup to integrate elements of the surrounding landscape and to highlight natural, contemporary beauty. The interior fuses clean-lined simplicity, an abundance of wood surfaces, and a restrained mix of Danish-modern and vintage furniture to create a visually stimulating yet relaxing environment that extends between indoor and outdoor living spaces.
An outdoor shower was the family’s first construction project. “Doing the shower made us realize we can build things the way we want to build them,” says Meg.
A Bay Area landscape designer works her yard like a jigsaw puzzle, packing a bevy of distinctive destinations into a steep and diminutive plot.

Photo by: Morgan Rachel Levy

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Karen White, David MacNaughtan, and their sons, Griffin and Finlay, hang out on the front deckof their narrow home in Toronto’s leafy Roncesvalles neighborhood. A narrow modernist composition of glass panes and purple brick, the house slips like a bookmark between two older buildings, a bright three-story abode on a lot narrower than most suburban driveways.  Photo by Dean Kaufman. Read more about the small house here.
Since surrounding neighbors can overlook the one-story property, Thomson created a roof detail that is environmentally friendly and attractive: “the bio-diverse [green] roof is planted with indigenous species of flowers and grasses,” he says.
Emilio Fuscaldo sits in the garden outside the brick house that he designed for himself and his partner, Anna Krien, on a small subdivided lot in Coburg, a suburb north of Melbourne, Australia. Photo by Nic Granleese.
The planks inside the house blend into those on the small porch just outside. It's a nice touch that helps marry the outdoors with the home's interior.
The Fung/Blatt family enjoys the backyard of their Mount Washington home. Despite its 5,000-square-foot lot, the house is just 1,640 square feet. Michael Blatt admits, “If we could add anything to this house, it would be five walk-in closets.”
Though the fire pit was “kind of an after-thought,” says Hannah, the family uses it year-round. “In the spring and fall, it warms you up on cool nights, and in the summer, it just adds ambience.”
Among the first Passive Houses in France, this bamboo-clad farmhouse by the Parisian firm Karawitz Architecture only uses a tenth of the energy a conventionally constructed home does. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.
The engawa deck is a traditional Japanese feature. It's a place where guests are often greeted to sit with a casual cup of tea. The David and Mayuko also uses it as a viewing porch toward the back yard for when the kids play in the grass.
Designed to be a welcoming space for visitors, the glassy foyer addition is clearly defined against the more private interior of the house.
Entry
patio
the owners enjoying the new garden terrace
A Chilean home’s dramatic stained-pine exterior references local vernacular architecture.
Thanks to passive solar and radiant floors, the metal-clad home is comfortable year-round.
Architect Janna Levitt devised a creative emellishment for a residence in Canada. Photo by: Philip Cheung
Mike Kurokawa and Paul Fishman set out for the beach from their house in the Puna region of Hawaii. A bridge leads from street level to the upper floor of the house, which is situated in a natural depression, or kipuka.
Helen Street by mw|works
The spruce panels that coat the second-floor exterior will fade in tandem with the zinc-coated steel that rims the glazed windows and doors. "They will go gray like we do," says Claesson.
The pitched facade has a sculptural play of spruce siding and triple-glazed windows that reflect the surrounding treetops.
Stepstone's narrow concrete pavers add a graphic touch to the garden.
Until Sasseen took ownership, the ground at the back of the house was sheathed in concrete. She created a softer environment when she replaced it with bluestone and planted beach grass that rustles in the ocean breeze.
At the base of Echo Mountain in Phoenix, a geometric home by Wendell Burnette opens up to the surrounding desert landscape. Photo by Dean Kaufman.
Classic butterfly chairs from Universal Patio Furniture are stationed by the pool. The mural is by street artist Morley, a close friend.
Architect Gregory Phillips connected the original house to a new modern extension that doesn’t interfere with the surrounding houses. “I try to be true to the location,”he explains, “so it doesn’t seem like some spaceship has landed.”
The outdoor fire pit.
At the Mill Valley home designed by architect Chris Deam for residents Jack and Ellen Corrigan, the view begins from the top. Sun studies of the steeply sloped site informed the choice for a standing-seam metal, diagonal ridge roof, which Chris refers to as the home’s “fifth facade”.
The courtyard-facing side of the garage provides an overhang for a multifunctional playroom or entertainment space.
Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor.
As the facade of a Bates Masi-designed home in Water Mill, New York, rises from eight to 14 feet high, the mahogany planks subtly widen. “It was quite a demand to make of the contractor,” architect Paul Masi says. “But the design was so much about traveling through the site and weaving [the house] together with the deck.”
In their concrete-walled courtyard, Yuka and Aaron watch as twins Emerson and Jasper, daughters Maude and Mirene, and Alfie the dog play. The house is painted in Black Bean Soup by Benjamin Moore, a color in keeping with the period of the original architecture
Even in cold weather, they open the sliding doors to let the fresh air in.
“Before, the house turned its back on the landscape,” said Parish. “This renovation and addition really animates the garden.” Sliding glass doors match those of the living room beyond the deck, and both can be completely open to the yard.
The rooftop courtyard is lined with a verdant mix of indigenous plants, including banana trees, palm trees, lion’s claw, Mexican breadfruit, and native vines. The chaise longues were designed for Farca’s EF Collection.
Four-year-old Ian plays in the courtyard, which is the center of family life in warmer months.
The elevated dining room opens out to a side patio, which climbs the wall just behind the house.
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Located on Hawaii’s Big Island, the Lavaflow 1 - Robert Trickey House was designed by San Francisco-based architect, Craig Steely. Captured by architectural photographer Mike Kelley, this home and studio was built on hardened lava from the 1955 Kilauea eruption.
Thanks to Matthew Hufft, their envelope-pushing architect and longtime friend, Hannah and Paul Catlett have a new home in southwestern Missouri that’s a fresh, unconventional take on the traditional farmhouse.
Harper sits on the porch just off the entrance. James notes that the children spend their time “swimming in the dam, feeding the chickens, and riding their ponies or bikes. It’s really just the simple stuff that we had when we grew up in the late ’70s and ’80s."
Juan O'Gorman: Casa O'Gorman in Mexico City, Mexico, 1929
Shigeru Ban: The Curtain Wall House in Tokyo, Japan, 1994-1995
A mature avocado tree shades the hardscaped patio located just outside the great room.
Looking like a jewel box at dusk, Scott Stafne’s Canti-lever House rests easy in the middle of the Washington woods. With miles of hiking trails, lakes, and waterfalls to explore, Stafne’s property provides almost unlimited opportunity for outdoor adventures. The strong and sturdy house acts as a warm respite from the elements when the weather won’t cooperate, which is often—horizontal rain and whipping winds can be the norm.
Mimicking the cantilever of the house, an outdoor shower just off the master bedroom stretches out gently toward the surrounding woods.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.