Dwell's Favorite 393 Exterior House Design Photos And Ideas

Leaning Yucca House by DF_DC Architects © Rory Gardiner
A simple boardwalk leads up to the timber-clad volume, which appears as a sculptural black box upon entry.
Wood screens blur the boundary between indoor and outdoor spaces.
When closed, the screens blend in with the cedar siding.
The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo.
Guillermo, who left the land-scaping mostly natural, is now planting trees to help offset deforestation in the region.
Suspended in the forest, the Pinecone tree house is a sight to behold.
Liddicoat and Goldhill's home in the Victoria Park conservation area sports a steeply slanted roofline.
Casa JB at night.
Marilyn Monroe is said to have stayed in the charming guesthouse.
"The house is totally introverted [and] mysterious towards the street and extroverted towards the interior," says Morini.
The home is clad in sustainably sourced spotted gum. A natural material palette is used throughout.
The roof creates a dialogue with the surrounding landscape through multiple sloped planes, irregular lines, and an absence of overhangs. The home's form appears to change according to one's angle of approach.
The garage doors are finished in the same painted cedar cladding as the external walls, helping them seamlessly blend in.
On the exterior, architect Ron Rea selected a deep black-brown that's not an historically accurate color, but honors the architectural form.
IF House - Photo 12
The Palm Springs Modern Committee relocated and reconstructed a full-scale replica of architect Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House. It's currently on loan from the Sarasota Architectural Foundation.
The dark exterior wood cladding ensures the home blends more seamlessly with the site, while the flat roof is meant to recall "midcentury precedents," said the architects. The “sharkfin clerestory roof” feature transmits light into interior rooms.
"The main forms were wrapped in stainless steel to reflect the landscape and create a colorful, shimmering, envelope," explain the architects on their website.
The home is surrounded by extensive gardens and mature trees.
The journey through the dark tunnel to the new, light-filled addition is both a texturally interesting and atmospheric experience, where the contrast between old and new, dark and light, can be felt.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
Settled on a picturesque hillside in Somona, California, the Connect 5 residence features stunning floor-to-ceiling windows, which allow warm natural light to flood through the home.
Architects Stéphane Rasselet and David Dworkind delivered with a strikingly simple concept, anchoring two stacked, rectangular volumes into a steep mountainside surrounded by awe-inspiring vistas.
"Hemmed in by taller buildings on both sides, the original cottage was overwhelmed and neglected for decades—its identity compromised by inappropriate treatments. The new design provides a sensitive and recessive backdrop to the faithfully restored dwelling that originated more than 160 years ago in England,
A south elevation view of the front entry reveals its angular composition. The roofing is Spandeck by LYSAGHT in the Monument finish.
In order to maintain privacy for both guests and homeowners, Oikos was designed with the strongest viewpoints in mind, capturing the best vistas while sheltering views back to the homestead.
Cabin Knapphullet is small cabin inspired by its location nestled between large rocks and low vegetation of the Sandefjord coast in Norway. It is only 323 square feet, but contains an open living space with a bathroom and a mezzanine bed that sleeps two people. Although the building occupies a small footprint, the space expands vertically over four levels including a roof terrace.
The living lounge, dining and kitchen are located within the larger of the two volumes.
Covered in mirrored glass that’s transparent when viewed from within, the façade of this Mexican forest retreat reflects the color, light, and movements of its natural surroundings.
Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
Large, dramatic openings bring transparency and contrast to the 10-inch-thick concrete facade, framing perspectival views of the landscape.
“Even when the Kirio system is not connected to the router, it’s constantly downloading information about energy usage.” —Tiffany Bowie, architect
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
According to Remijnse, since the only direction they could build on the small site was up, they decided to add height with a gabled roof.
The solar panels on the roof often get covered in a heavy layer of snow, but with periodic clearing, they are as effective during the sunny days of winter as they are during fairer weather.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
A sprawling deck on the second story takes up more than half the footprint of the home.
The cabins are made up of two layers of wood construction. The exterior layer is made of Larch wood with a custom glazing.
Stinessen placed each cabin carefully in order to ensure the best possible views and the right amount of privacy.
This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins—one of which juts out from a natural ledge. Each of them fit two to four travelers or a family of five.
Cho’s recently completed vacation retreat, the Concrete Box House, was inspired by the use of raw materials. Cho decided on grape vines as an unusual landscape element.
Cedar slats mark the facade of Floating House, Doug and Becca Worple's lake house in Ontario. The architects, MOS, chose materials and shapes that wouldn’t stand out. “They’re really simple, almost Platonic forms,” principal Michael Meredith says. The modest cabin has boat, a gabled roof and a cladding of untreated cedar, a material that shows up on docks and homes along Georgian Bay. “Allowing the buildings to weather seems the right thing to do,” Sample says. And it’s ready for winter: Sliding barn doors seal the place up as an impenetrable box.
#smallspace #cabin #woods #exterior #architecture #snow
Suzanne and Brooks Kelley at the back of their 1,100-square-foot guest cottage.
Built with a steel frame, the Frost House features panels of styrofoam between aluminum sheets for the exterior walls and styrofoam between plywood for the roof and floors. Bold, primary colors accentuate its geometric form.  
Shortly after Karen Valentine and Bob Coscarelli purchased the home in 2016, they began to unearth nuggets of information about its pedigree. Their realtor had provided a brochure that identified the prefab as designed by architect Emil Tessin for the now-defunct Alside Homes Corporation based out of Akron, Ohio, which had held a patent for the structure’s aluminum paneling. Their new neighbors provided a stack of Alside Homes sales materials, floor plans of various models, and even a script that had been written for salespeople during home tours. They determined that the Frost House had been a sales model for the company, and that Tessin had been the son of Emil Albert Tessin, the legal guardian of Florence Knoll.
Exposed steel, concrete soffits, and cement-washed bricks were been chosen as key components of the home due to the materials having low-maintenance, yet being extremely durable.
The box-like wooden structure contains pit-like spaces that dip below the raised foundation level.
Project Name: Orinda Connect 8 & Connect 2

Website: http://connect-homes.com/dev/
Project Name: Vertical House

Website: https://www.muji.com/jp/
Web developer Rich Yessian involved local preservation groups early and often to gain permission to unite home, office, and outdoors at an aged warehouse that, according to Sanborn Maps, predates the Civil War.
Speaking to his original design, architect Saul Zaik says, “We were really just building boxes with a bunch of windows but experimenting with how you integrated indoor and outdoor spaces.” The house has seven different openings to the exterior, allowing different courtyard or patio settings for a range of outdoor activities, including seating for a gathering on the street-facing side. The Milfords hired Lilyvilla Gardens for the landscaping around the house, including variegated bluestone steps with thyme joints.
Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, with project manager and lead designer Emily Kudsen Leland at the helm, remade a Portland abode with a crisp paint palette: Benjamin Moore’s Wrought Iron for the cladding and Venetian Gold for the front door. Landscape design is by Lilyvilla Gardens.
Architects Geoffrey Warner and BJ Siegel collaborated to achieve this prefab home in the Sonoma Mountains. This was originally featured in Dwell 'Steel the Scene.'
Windows added to the side corners of the north facade bring additional daylight indoors.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.