Dwell's Favorite 457 Exterior Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

A 24-by24-foot Cor-ten-clad pavilion tops the three-story addition.
The house comprises a series of modules, with the main living areas occupying the center and the master bedroom on the right. A large deck juts off the living room.
The team reviewed twenty years of snowfall data to find an average that would dictate the height of the house’s base. They also extended the roof to protect both the front entrance and the deck—this way the family doesn’t need to worry about snow removal upon arrival or dealing with windows that won’t open.
The two sleeping quarters contain more solid facade than glass to provide adequate privacy.
Lisa and the boys playing Ring Around the Rosie. (2016, before the guest suite addition)
Northeast. The facade to the northeast has an indentation over the second floor with a hidden window row that gives an indistinct light in the social space.
The row of pillars continues to the same height as around the upper house and crowns of a horizontal beam. The composition from the inside continues on the outside and also marks the location of a future roof terrace.
Below Kovel’s apartment is Fritts’ furniture shop, Intelligent Design, and around the corner West Enders can expect a new branch of Seattle’s Ace Hotel and the new Portland headquarters for the architecture firm Zimmer Gunsul Frasca.
The architect chose granite for the house’s base, zinc for its roof, and Scandinavian pinewood for cladding—all materials that complement the nearby gray stone building.
Once a horse stable, this Chicago house first got a superficial makeover from Oprah (we wonder whether Stedman likes modern) before architect Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang was called in for a more substantial renovation and a dazzlingly porous brick screen.
The exterior is clad in louro gamela,a tropical hardwood.
Just off Pacific Avenue, architect Lorcan O’Herlihy designed this home for himself and his wife with a dark blue façade and dazzling display of colored window.
Master balcony designed to give the experience of being in and living below the canopy of a tree.  The windows are positioned and oriented to allow the ocean breezes to flow through the home
North Elevation
Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
The project’s unique challenges—a tight budget and steep, difficult terrain — led the architects to a creative solution that gave the house its delightfully sculptural appearance. Making the first floor’s envelope slightly narrower than the top one’s saved money while minimizing the amount of excavation required. “We were then able to create a wider floor plate on the upper level by having it cantilever over the lower level,” Dworkind explains.
Gray Organschi took down a worn-out 1970s summer home and reinvented it as a serene pair of bleached cedar volumes connected by a glass bridge.
“Your first impression is that the house is very closed,” says David Barragán of the building he designed with Jose María Sáez in Quito, Ecuador. Stacked concrete forms, developed by Barragán and Sáez and used as planters along the front facade, offer privacy and integrate the building with the site.
A bridge spans the home’s steep site for street access.
Hale and Maisie peer out of one of the living-room windows, from where Edmonds (pictured at left with Pippa) dreams about installing a zip-line directly to their garden patch.
The design team lowered the cellar floor by a foot and extended a rear-facade addition toward the lake. “I am all for an architecture for its time— this house had a strong personality,” Jens says. “The overscale windows create  a tension, a dialogue . . . it’s  a new element, but one that celebrates the original idea.”
Cedar slats help this Ontario lake house float soundly atop still waters. Photo by: Raimund Koch
The cedar-clad home designed by Herbst Architects faces the Pacific Ocean, tucked behind sand dunes from the sparsely populated Medlands Beach.
Though not made of stone or brick like the other holiday homes, this two-person escape on Scotland’s picturesque Isle of Skye, designed by Rural Design Architects was made with corrugated metal, a material that is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
This cute cottage near the remote County Kerry lakeside town of Treangarriv has a modern poured concrete extension that mimics the original adjoining cottage. The color of the wood grain oxidized concrete matched the mountains in the background and helps the extension blend seamlessly into the landscape. The bathroom has a glass roof so guests can gaze up at the stars from a sunken bathtub.
A lightweight frame enclosed with taut fabric and sheets of Jobert Okume marine plywood are used for this 44-square-foot hybrid prefab trailer house.
Rolling Huts by Olson Kundig

There are a lot reasons to follow Olson Kundig on Instagram. One of them is their seminal Rolling Huts project.
Cho’s recently completed vacation retreat, the Concrete Box House, was inspired by the use of raw materials. Cho decided on grape vines as an unusual landscape element.
The defining feature of this lakeside cabin in northern Idaho is a 30-by-20-foot window wall that opens the living area to the surrounding lake and forest. Concrete blocks, steel, and plywood make up the simple palette of materials.
The concept of this Scandinavian getaway was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-quare-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
Architect Paul Hinkin and his partner, Chrissy Pearce, bought and restored a 538-square-foot Deckhouse at Emsworth Yacht Harbour in Hampshire, England.
With the help of builder Peter Watts, the couple returned the house to its original early-1970s glory, utilizing the space beneath for both boat and car.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
Clad in gray wood, HYT is a mobile home in a Bavarian forest that’s available for holiday rentals. Resembling a hut from the outside, this mobile guesthouse, which have a mini kitchen, bathroom and wood stove has 12 sleeping spaces, and can be towed to just the spot you like by a tractor. The unit is available for approximately $116 for two people per night from Urlaubsarchitektur.
Leroy tools around on his mini turbo tractor while munching on a gigantic cookie; his parents look on with envy.
Leo Marmol and Alisa Becket enjoy one of their home’s many outdoor spaces.
Marmol and Becket with their daughter, Emilia. The intersecting modules were designed to frame a range of spectacular desert vistas.
Plants found in the surrounding landscape were used to obscure the lines between designed and natural worlds.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half.
When Jennifer and Mattias Segerholt decided to move to Portland after five years in Los Angeles, a shared climate-based trepidation shaped their real estate search.
In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
White brick exterior of Goddard and Mandolene’s home post renovation.
Bold, red-colored shipping containers were used to create a (12 meter long) visitor area extension for the National Theatres Company of Korea. Designed as a social zone for theatregoers, the space was equipped with internal sliding partition walls that can be opened or closed to allow for flexible use of the interior spaces.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
Anne Suttles waters the bamboo muhly, palo verde, strawberry tree, and magic carpet thyme thriving in their Austin yard.
Set on the edge of Puertos de Beceite national park in Aragon, Spain, and available for vacation rentals, Casa Solo Pezo is a striking concrete square structure set on top of a smaller concrete square bass. Designed by award-winning and MoMA-exhibited Chilean architects at Pezo Von Ellrichshausen, this thoroughly modern residence has proportions and an interior layout that follows those of traditional Mediterranean homes with a strong indoor/outdoor connection.
Designed Californian architects Swatt Miers, these three tea houses on a private property were conceived as spaces outside the main home that would be free from the distractions of Internet, telecommunications and television. The largest of the three pavilions is used as a workspace, the second as a bedroom, and the third as a meditation pavilion.
Kevin Daly Architects created a geometric perforated, folding metal skin supported by an aluminum exoskeleton, which shades the two-story glazed courtyard-facing façade of this home in Venice, California.
To tackle the challenges of a steep slopping site and a tight budget, architect Dan Rockhill used a slatted exterior screen of Cumaru wood to shields inexpensive metal sidings for this Kansas home.
To create the feel of a seaside retreat, Mitsuori Architects included Australian Ironbark wood slats on the rear-facing wall of this rorenovated this Victoiran heritage home in Melbourne. Ironbark is an incredibly durable hardwood that turns a beautiful silvery-gray as it weathers over time.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.