Dwell's Favorite 458 Exterior Design Photos And Ideas - Page 3

The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The 925-square-foot house Maggie Treanor calls home blends into the landscape somewhat; with a galvanized steel shed roof and siding, it looks like a high-design little brother to the barns on the surrounding farms.
Suzanne and Brooks Kelley at the back of their 1,100-square-foot guest cottage.
Photo by Patrick Barta
Lightweight corrugated zinc roof sheeting clads the exterior.
David Ferguson of Kimo Estate took construction into his own hands in a two-person owner-builder team.
#smallspace #cabin #woods #exterior #architecture #snow
Composed of primarily steel, this prefab home has sufficient outdoor space. Photo by: Daniel Hennessy
After months of arduous design and construction, Marmol and Becket are thrilled to escape Los Angeles for their idyllic desert retreat.
Mobile sustainability: 

The sliding doors were made in Syracuse by CabFab with a formaldehyde-free plant-and-soy-based composite board manufactured by e2e of Ithaca, New York. The mobile 

partitions were fashioned from TimberStrand, an engineered lumber made from younger trees rather than old-growth timber. 

cabfab.com 

e2ematerials.com 

ilevel.com

An unconventional exterior: The solar screen is made from medium-density 

overlay plywood, a widely available and relatively 

affordable material whose traditional use for highway 

signs testifies to its durability.
Corporate high-flyers and admitted neat freaks Bruce Thatcher and Kirsty Leighton couldn’t handle the chaos anymore. Read more about this Victorian terrace in London here.
Marcus Lee and Rachel Hart’s wonderful wooden home sits at the end of a quiet London lane and politely turns its back on the workshops next door.
Coastal Sunset ,  Jacob's '73 BMW 2002
Outside of the studio, a small deck features a cedar soaking tub.
“They were really pushing for a traditional farmhouse,” explains architect Matthew Hufft, of the Kansas City–based firm Hufft Projects. “But through the design process, they got more and more excited about modern.”
The street-facing facade leans into the landscape with a three-foot-deep cantilever and toward a pathway of hexagonal concrete pavers.
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“The backyard, which was kind of the focus of the project, was overgrown and quite disconnected from the house itself,” said architect Nigel Parish. The glass doors of the addition open onto a patio and lawn where the kids can play.
Kayak in hand, Tom and Will make a break for the beach.
Bach to the BeachWith authenticity and simplicity as their rallying cry, a Kiwi architect and his wife have built a modern beach house that puts a fresh spin on the local vernacular.
The Baumann family residence in Gowanus, Brooklyn, is all geometry up front, with a rectilinear grid of steel and cypress comprising the structure’s double facade.
Entirely off the grid, the house is powered by four photovoltaic panels that supply electricity to lights, small appliances, and water pumps.
“The house is a piece of origami made out of triangular shapes, which we then draped over the landscape,” says Arbel.
Resident Elizabeth Twaddell enjoys the weather with her daughter Uma outside the guesthouse Neal Schwartz designed for her mother-in-law, Surendra, who frequently visits for extended stays. A concrete driveway forks off from the main house to lead to a covered breezeway, sited between the new 775-square-foot structure and a two-car garage.
Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, with project manager and lead designer Emily Kudsen Leland at the helm, remade a Portland abode with a crisp paint palette: Benjamin Moore’s Wrought Iron for the cladding and Venetian Gold for the front door. Landscape design is by Lilyvilla Gardens.
Standing-seam copper siding accentuates sections of the structure that provide shear support for the steel moment frame.
A narrow building next to the main structure houses storage and an outdoor kitchen.
Residents are allowed a small swatch of land to plant gardens.
In Montara, California, architect Michael Maltzan designed a home for, his sister and 

brother-in-law. From certain vantage points, the home’s unique angles result in M.C. Escher–like optical illusions.
Guests ascend a staircase into the cabin, while a small lift carries up their luggage.
The housees that circle San Francisco's Buena Vista Park run the gamut from wedding-cake Victorian to Scandinavian modern. Architect Cass Calder Smith aimed to create a façade that contextually relates to the adjacent ornate ones yet is purely modern.
Located in Los Angeles' Pacific Palisades neighborhood, The Eames House, also known as Case Study House No. 8, is a landmark of midcentury modern architecture. Constructed in 1949 by husband-and-wife Charles and Ray Eames, they lived in the home—which served as both their home and studio—until their deaths. Charles in 1978 and Ray, ten years to the day, in 1988.
Lesser known but equally stunning is Pierre Koenig’s Bailey House, Case Study House #21. A simple one-story box with a flat roof, built mostly of steel and glass, Koenig achieved his goal of designing a home which was both affordable and beautiful. The Bailey House currently houses Seomi International Gallery which offers visits by appointment.
In a tightly packed Tokyo, a group of apartments shares a central courtyard. Photo by Dean Kaufman.
London based photographer, Ed Reeve used dark cedar to achieve his lifelong goal: to build his own house on a perfect plot of land located in De Beauvoir Town. Photos by: Ed Reeve
A wide cut across the top of the structure made room for a second-floor courtyard where the family can catch some sun but maintain their privacy. On the ground level, the front door is tucked into an ivy-covered alcove lined with ipe, a material used throughout the house.
“We sought to create a house that would not damage the environment and not be too visible,” says architect Tina Gregorič. A single zigzagging roof stretches over 5,380 square feet, doubling the area of the interior spaces and serving as an ideal spot for sunset cocktails and whale-watching.
“We wanted to make a delicate mark on the landscape, without blending into it outright,” says Andersson.
Alterstudio Architecture of Austin designed this house in the Texas capital for a young family of four.
Brown and his dog Katsu head to the river; the path was once a dumping ground on top of a long-defunct underground oil pipeline. The land required a complicated excavation process, offering an opportunity for Bercy to partially bury the house. The green roof was conceptualized by John Hart Asher of the Ecosystem Design Group at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.
Austin couple Anne Suttles and Sam Shah built a house to last their lifetime—and longer. Mixing new efficient systems with old upcycled materials in their home, they keep it weird while keeping it green.

Here, Anne waters the bamboo muhly, palo verde, strawberry tree, and magic carpet thyme thriving in their yard.

Photo by: Brent Humphreys
Andy and Regina Rihn lean on their other blue-clad affordable design, a 1958 AMC Rambler Super station wagon, in front of their house in Austin, Texas.
Renowned designer and architect Jens Risom sourced parts from a catalog for his customized A-frame and had them delivered in pieces to his remote island site off Rhode Island, helped to raise the aesthetic profile of modular construction.
The couple’s son Dylan and dog Petra enjoy the deck while Mary Kate and Thomas work in the kitchen below. Sliding doors open to the outdoors on both sides.
Here's the cover image in all its glory. Van der Rohe's Farnsworth House is the essential glass house (sorry Philip J) and looks pretty spectacular in the snow. One wonders if those windows are double-paned though. Photo by Jason Schmidt.
Delta Shelter | Olson Kundig
The front deck was designed to
Large, dramatic openings bring transparency and contrast to the 10-inch-thick concrete facade, framing perspectival views of the landscape.
Simple solid and void carvings create a purposefully oriented and constructed complex of volumes that pull the user out to nature and in to repose.
Two Black Sheds incorporates all the conventional aspects of a weekend retreat in a rather unconventional way.
Resident Brian Whitlock saved some serious cash by taking on much of the construction and electrical work himself.
“I wanted to plant a green roof for its thermal mass, but I wanted it to be as natural as possible,” Liang says.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.