Dwell's Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

SIERRA FRIA
SIERRA FRIA
This steel-and-glass house, set amid dense forest south of Ithaca, New York, captivated Maria Cook and Lance Compa when they first toured it in 2004. They bought it not long afterward and turned it into a weekend retreat.
In this Brazilian home, São Paulo studio Jacobsen Arquitetura placed laminated timber porticoes approximately 1.31 feet apart, to create a dynamic linear aesthetics that brings to mind the tori gates of Kyoto’s famous Fushimi Inari shrine.
This Southern Californian home by architect Sebastian Mariscal has a wabi-sabi spirit, and is built with shou sugi ban timber, has a koi pond, wand a protective overhang, and a tertiary space known in in traditional Japanese homes as the
Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1955, the Louis Penfield House is a 1,730-square-foot, residence in Lake County, Ohio, that has details like ribbon windows, “goutenjou” coffered ceilings, and a floating wooden staircase inspired by Japanese minimalism.
When redesigning “Madmen” actor Vincent Kartheiser’s Hollywood cabin, architect Funn Roberts installed custom shoji-style screens of to conceal the closet and provide privacy for the adjacent shower and soaking tub.
For this 780-square-foot apartment Hong Kong apartment, local practice MNB Design Studio used plywood, smart storage solutions, and tapped into the principles of origami to create a highly structured, minimalist home.
Fashion designer Josie and her husband Ken Natori are big fans of traditional Japanese architecture, so when Brooklyn-based practice Tsao & McKown Architects designed their home in Pound Ridge, New York, they used a heavy, exposed-timber structure, and included Japanese-style gardens and landscaping.
To maximize space in this tiny 323-square-foot studio Budapest apartment, local design studio POSITION Collective used an elevated, plywood sleeping unit inspired by Japanese “tansu” mobile cabinetry, with secrete storage modules on the side of the steps leading up to the futon bed.
Inspired by modern Japanese minimalism, Hong Kong practice JAAK demolished the walls of this two-bedroom apartment and remodelled it into a studio with an
Architect Charlie Lazor designed this peaceful, lakeside prefab in Ontario, Canada with a Japanese-style bathroom, clad in teak, with a matching tub and sink by Bath in Wood.
Influenced by both Benedictine monasteries and Japanese residences, award-winning British architect John Pawson created The Life House – a minimalist holiday rental home in Wales with a pure and uncluttered ambience that encourages a state of quietude and contemplation.
A dining room that was converted to a library.
Architecture by Jim Olson
Set in Washington's remote Methow Valley, the Studhorse House rests on a 20-acre site that is nestled in the northern portion of the 60-mile long glacial valley. The buildings are arranged to frame carefully composed views of the surrounding Studhorse Ridge and Pearrygin Lake. Design Principal, Tom Kundig.
On San Juan island, Pole Pass is an intimate waterfront retreat built to serve as a gathering space that takes advantage of the temperate Pacific Northwest summers.
"The Herd" as they are often referred to, sit out in the open in breathtaking scenery. Tanner Construction collaborated with Tom Kundig on the project for the same client who commissioned Delta Shelter. As the story goes, the rolling huts were zoned for an RV park so Kundig put them on steel wheels to swerve around the local building code. Photo by Tim Bies.
In Seattle's rapidly developing South Lake Union neighborhood, the Art Stable is a classic example of urban infill. Built on the site of a former horse stable, the seven-story mixed-use building carries its history into the future with highly adaptable live/work units.
Olson Kundig Architects created Studhorse in Washington's remote Methow Valley as four structures oriented around a central courtyard, each positioned to best enjoy the surrounding vistas in all four seasons.
Montecito Residence - Tom Kundig / Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects

Photo courtesy of Tobias Laarmann


Photo by Rafael Gamo
Photo courtesy of Coral von Zumwalt
Set on a steel frame and reached by a bridge, the master suite extends up to 13 feet above the sloping grade.
Colthoff, project architect Jon Jeronimus, and general contractor Derek Nicholson used two techniques to build the house: post-and-beam for the great room and master suite and stick-frame for the guest wing and entry area. Near the front door, there’s a special tub for the owners to wash their dogs in after hikes. The basin has a low opening and is made of durable concrete, courtesy of Mag’s Concrete Works. The wood paneling is walnut.
The master suite is warmed by a Badger 3112 woodstove by Morsø.
The main corridor bends 100 degrees from end to end and leads to three guest rooms, each with a different color door. “Roland took a Lawren Harris painting and matched the colors perfectly,” says David.
A mosaic tile wall softens the laboratory-like effect of the glossy kitchen cabinets.
One-Family Custom Housing: Olson Kundig Architects created this home in Washington's remote Methow Valley as four structures oriented around a central courtyard, each positioned to best enjoy the surrounding vistas in all four seasons.
The steel canopy protects the residents from Seattle’s notoriously rainy weather as they walk from the entry gate to the front door.
Black stone worktops, waxed concrete walls, and the traditional rustic tiles (called “witjes”) give textural and tonal variety and offset the warm woody tones that dominate this kitchen. The rustic theme is continued in the iron hooks and bars—simple but effective fittings.
In 2011, clients Brent Habig and Ana Ecclesthe surveyed the property with architect Jim Cutler, planting stakes at a number of sites. Cutler drew up a different house for each, recalling from his youth the region’s vernacular—especially the crisp white barns nestled into lush green landscapes. They would inspire the form of the couple’s new 2,800-square-foot home. It is designed to capture natural light, but also to cool interiors on hot summer days, using tall, sliding shutters that can cover the two-story home’s windows from floor to ceiling.
The ever-changing daylight, plus the use of curtains and lighting options, means that Ahlgren and Lökaas enjoy a variety of different atmospheres.
In the kitchen, a high western window carries the eye past neighboring rooftops to the lush hillside beyond. A wall also extends out to block sight of a neighboring deck. The architects paired custom shelving with slate-gray cabinets by Henrybuilt, cool Basaltina countertops, and white Corian backsplash. The faucet is by Cifial.
A wooden bench wraps along a dining corner, and extends along the walls towards the fireplace, where it serves as a bookshelf, then fireside bench.
A kitchen with a Siemems integrated oven.
Gravasoni Gray 23 dining chairs and a Flos Smithfield black pendant in the dining area.
A “Schof” – a type of closed porch that’s common in the Alpine region of Austria, links the corridor-kitchen to the western side of the house.
A bathtub that looks out to views of the trees,
The sleeping nook can be accessed via steps with storage underneath.
A “space cube”, made of Fenix NTM's matte nanotech material combined with warm oak serves as sleeping nook and storage.
The walls of the apartment were left unplastered.

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.