Dwell's Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

The studio’s second floor serves as a library. The sunken bathtub offers interrupted sightlines across the space and out into the backyard. The tub, like the library’s floor, is made of concrete.
Architect Tamira Sawatzky used Ikea components—one-inch Lagan butcher block countertops and inexpensive Ekby Lerberg brackets—when designing the bookshelves along the living room wall in the home/studio he designed for himself and his wife in Toronto.
The cavernous living room takes advantage of its height with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves.
Aston pendants by House Doctor match the metallic hue of the tap.  White Miura Stools be PLANK provide seating at the island.
The functional one-wall kitchen is open to the first floor dining and living area.
The built-in window seat can double as a guest bed.
#bath #spa #bath&spa #modern #interior #interiordesign #GeorgeNakashima #1977 #sansovilla #receptionhouse #greenliving #pennytile #japanese #japan #abstractpattern #bathrub #sculptural
Dynamic rooflines create interesting forms while simultaneously opening clerestory windows perfect for letting in natural light to each studio.
A narrow building next to the main structure houses storage and an outdoor kitchen.
Sigurd Larsen's kitchen design was also used for the Danish interior and design house Broste's Copenhagen head office. Broste was founded in 1955, and is today one of Scandinavia's biggest brands within interior design.
Light and shadow play on the textured facade.  Greenery frames the simple, geometric form of the house.
The aluminium-framed windows throughout are by Australian company Capral. “We wanted as much glass as possible to enjoy the almost 360-degree views,” says resident Sarah Younger.

Tasmania, Australia
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Verona chairs from Structube surround a vintage dining table.
-
North Hatley, Quebec
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
Built in 1948 and named 'Toyhill' by Wright himself, this Usonian home is considered an artistic masterpiece and shows Wright's early interest in overlapping circular masonry, which would become an innovative and iconic treatment found in his later work—including the Guggenheim Museum.
Lushna's dwellings are available in Europe and the U.S., though for customers in the latter, prices can vary based on shipping costs and taxes. The baseline price of Villa Massive, seen here, is approximately $9,375. The canvas-lined Villa Air's is $4,453. To see Lushna's full range of products, visit their website here!
The units don't even require foundations—simple ground screws from Krinner are enough to support them.
The Andersen Architectural Collection’s Eagle windows and doors provide the panes and passageways of the home.
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
The living room, kitchen, and dining room sit below street level in an open, communal area. A large, operable skylight measuring six by three meters allows light to stream over the dining table—the four glass panes had to be craned over the neighboring buildings.
Brass finishings and an eye-catching range hood contrast with cool Carrara marble.
Tom Givone’s clients, Rose and Steve Smith, teach overseas and have owned their house for 26 years. They intended to fix it up slowly and retire there. As one problem led to another, they reached a point when they felt their only option, as Rose put it, was to “burn it down.”
Before the Moumings built their house, they camped out on their six acres while preparing the land for farming, planting grass and clover in place of soybean stubble. As the house arose from its foundation, soil-fixing plants grew from seed. Now the couple can focus on growing food.
Torontonians Dan and Diane Molenaar head north to Drag Lake when they need a weekend away from urban life—though they brought some of the city with them. The mirrored windows that circle the cottage were recycled from two office towers in Toronto.
House O, designed by Jun Igarashi, forgoes hallways and interior doors in favor of casually interconnected rooms.
The house is divided into three sections connected by a series of outdoor galleries. “When I walk from one room to another, I have to go outdoors and feel the weather and nature—rain, cold, and sun,” says Sævik. 

Instead of emphasizing the expansive panorama of oak, pine, and aspen trees, the house frames select views—a move inspired by Japanese design.
Lynn
The west patio
The west patio opens up to a grass area that can be enjoyed by many.
SIERRA FRIA
SIERRA FRIA
This steel-and-glass house, set amid dense forest south of Ithaca, New York, captivated Maria Cook and Lance Compa when they first toured it in 2004. They bought it not long afterward and turned it into a weekend retreat.
In this Brazilian home, São Paulo studio Jacobsen Arquitetura placed laminated timber porticoes approximately 1.31 feet apart, to create a dynamic linear aesthetics that brings to mind the tori gates of Kyoto’s famous Fushimi Inari shrine.
This Southern Californian home by architect Sebastian Mariscal has a wabi-sabi spirit, and is built with shou sugi ban timber, has a koi pond, wand a protective overhang, and a tertiary space known in in traditional Japanese homes as the
Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1955, the Louis Penfield House is a 1,730-square-foot, residence in Lake County, Ohio, that has details like ribbon windows, “goutenjou” coffered ceilings, and a floating wooden staircase inspired by Japanese minimalism.
When redesigning “Madmen” actor Vincent Kartheiser’s Hollywood cabin, architect Funn Roberts installed custom shoji-style screens of to conceal the closet and provide privacy for the adjacent shower and soaking tub.
For this 780-square-foot apartment Hong Kong apartment, local practice MNB Design Studio used plywood, smart storage solutions, and tapped into the principles of origami to create a highly structured, minimalist home.
Fashion designer Josie and her husband Ken Natori are big fans of traditional Japanese architecture, so when Brooklyn-based practice Tsao & McKown Architects designed their home in Pound Ridge, New York, they used a heavy, exposed-timber structure, and included Japanese-style gardens and landscaping.

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.