Dwell's Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

Californian modernism informs the shape of this Minnesota residence.
Strategically placed openings and an automated roof window at the apex of the slanted ceiling can be opened to release hot air during the summer months.
The house was constructed with a wooden frame and cellulose insulation.
With original steel-framed windows, beamed ceilings, warm wood-paneled walls, and a gracious floor plan it makes for a wonderful entertaining space.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the French country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
Last but not least, make a major statement and designate separate living areas with the help of shipping containers. Two San Francisco art and travel addicts overhauled a loft—and customized a pair of shipping containers—to carve out a guest quarters and home office. Photo by Drew Kelly.
Mirrored glass allows this holiday home in Mexico to blend in with it's woodland site.
With invisible foundations, the house appears to hover above a grassy carpet.
A cutaway in the structure's cubic shape forms a front porch, where a graphic yellow door welcomes visitors. The roof slopes downwards, holding more intimate spaces at its lower end.
A courtyard helps isolate the interior of the house visually and acoustically from its urban surroundings, and provides a large opening on the envelope of the house, where light and shadow play enhance the colors and textures of the building throughout the day.
The house sits on a steep site and was positioned below a sandstone crop so as to be concealed from the street. The approach to the house is via a suspended concrete staircase.
The pitched roof reduces the extension's surface area to 12 percent less than that of a flat-roofed extension, creating a more compact building envelope—which translates to less material needed for construction and less space to heat or cool.
This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins—one of which juts out from a natural ledge. Each of them fit two to four travelers or a family of five.
The large expanses of glass frame views that were perfectly planned. The seating areas are furnished with Scandia lounge chairs that were designed by Hans Brattrud in the 1950s and are now being produced by Fjordfiesta.
Stinessen placed each cabin carefully in order to ensure the best possible views and the right amount of privacy.
The cabins are made up of two layers of wood construction. The exterior layer is made of Larch wood with a custom glazing.
The studio's original wooden beams were left intact.
Bedroom with a view.
In keeping with Viks’s design, the living room remains on the second floor. A bright yellow artwork by Ken’ichiro Taniguchi complements the Bend Sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia. The Random pendant lights are by Bertjan Pot for Moooi, the Yo-Yo coffee table is by Emanuele Zenere, and the Maltino Rug is by Linie Design. The hardwood flooring is from the Admiration line by Mirage.
Last year, Tahquitz Plaza, a business complex Kaptur designed in the 1970s, underwent a restoration, which he helped oversee.
Its cast-concrete roof slabs evoke any number of desert sights—the fronds of a palm, the faces of stones, even the armored plates of an armadillo.
Donald Wexler arrived in Palm Springs in 1952 after a stint at Richard Neutra’s office in Los Angeles eager to build on a large scale with steel—hence the prefab Steel Development Houses.
galley kitchen looking west
The interior design is characterized by restraint. Wood complements leather and concrete for a modern, natural-looking building that blend together with its lush surroundings.
Windows and skylights from the eastern façade bring in an abundance of light throughout the day.
Japanese "tansu" stairs with storage compartments underneath.
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The minimalist interiors showcase the simple material palette.
To help keep costs at bay, the dark exterior siding and feature staircase were constructed of fir plywood.
The staircase is constructed of laminated 3/4" plywood sheets, and all of the components are interlocking using mortise and tenon joints instead of fasteners.
The stylish staircase provides a strong focus for the open-plan interior, and was constructed out of fir plywood by Duerksen himself.
The footprint of the home was configured to accommodate all of the existing trees without risking damage to their roots. An exception was made for a tree which sat in the middle of the property which was showing signs of decay. A dense Canadian Maple, the tree was milled and repurposed as the central island/dining room table—also built by Duerksen himself—and is now located only 10 feet from its original location.
Duerksen now runs his own architecture firm out of the home.
A cooktop and refrigerator from Gaggenau, Bulthaup cabinets, a Miele oven, and an Asko dishwasher outfit the all-white kitchen, which is located on the entry-level floor.
The living room, office, and kitchen are sunken into the concrete floor, providing delineation in the open plan.

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Cupertino, California
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
"The ground floor layout and kitchen have been designed for simplicity and functionality. The dark weathered zinc on the exterior communicates with the blacks, whites, and grays of the interiors. However, the design of the interior achieves a softer touch by using bespoke detailing and a rich palette of materials such as stone and timber," says the architect.
The architect placed the windows at Sabrina’s eye level so that she’d be able to see her son, Rocco, playing in the yard outside. "You can feel the seasons changing here," says Chiavelli. "I grew up three miles from here, outside in nature. This is a house for experiencing life."
For the kitchen, architect Ivan Priatman selected an oven, hood, and cooktop from Teka and a Samsung refrigerator. While the table is his own design, the bar stools and chairs are from Informa.

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.