Dwell's Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

Homeowners Cecilia Tham and Yoel Karaso renovate their home in Barcelona, harmoniously overlapping elements of the old and the new. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel
Context and Contrast in the Alps | Austria

An Austrian vacation home’s design references its mountainside setting and expansive views across the valley. By Tom Lechner / LP Architektur
A long window frames panoramic views of the setting beyond.
The garage behind the concrete wall.
An entertainment lounge.
Fuss-free aesthetics continue into the master bedroom, where a sloped roof with concrete paint hides the ceiling beam.
A peek at the home from a distance.
The chandelier in one of the bedrooms is by David Weeks.
A sweeping, arc roof that slopes steeply on one side.
The house is set within an expansive meadow.
Blauvelt and Winter ground their soaring two-story living room with classics such as Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair and ottoman, a Noguchi coffee table, an Eames wire-base table and a Danish teak credenza, which displays their collection of pottery and a pair of Martz lamps made by Marshall Studios. Flor carpet tiles help add color to the neutral palette.
Every room of the house is light, bright, and comfortable to be in.
An arc-shaped, coral-colored volume that hides a powder room and has become a main feature of the design.
Supported on thin columns, the main volume hovers above the graveled entry, reaching out into the surroundings.
The dark-stained exterior cladding stands in contrast to the light wood decking and warm interiors.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
The idea behind Endémico is "luxury camping." Set on 40 acres of gorgeous, unspoiled terrain, there are 20 bungalows and a shared pool for guests to take a dip in. The Encuentro Guadalupe winery offers guests access to local wines as well as a peek at how they are processed through winemaking courses. Encuentro's restaurant will feature dishes that incorporate local flavors as well as a cooking school where people can learn how to prepare creative meals with the guidance of talented young chefs.
The mirror-clad shed gives the property a sense of constant movement.
Californian modernism informs the shape of this Minnesota residence.
Strategically placed openings and an automated roof window at the apex of the slanted ceiling can be opened to release hot air during the summer months.
The house was constructed with a wooden frame and cellulose insulation.
With original steel-framed windows, beamed ceilings, warm wood-paneled walls, and a gracious floor plan it makes for a wonderful entertaining space.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the French country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
Last but not least, make a major statement and designate separate living areas with the help of shipping containers. Two San Francisco art and travel addicts overhauled a loft—and customized a pair of shipping containers—to carve out a guest quarters and home office. Photo by Drew Kelly.
Mirrored glass allows this holiday home in Mexico to blend in with it's woodland site.
With invisible foundations, the house appears to hover above a grassy carpet.
A cutaway in the structure's cubic shape forms a front porch, where a graphic yellow door welcomes visitors. The roof slopes downwards, holding more intimate spaces at its lower end.
A courtyard helps isolate the interior of the house visually and acoustically from its urban surroundings, and provides a large opening on the envelope of the house, where light and shadow play enhance the colors and textures of the building throughout the day.
The house sits on a steep site and was positioned below a sandstone crop so as to be concealed from the street. The approach to the house is via a suspended concrete staircase.
The pitched roof reduces the extension's surface area to 12 percent less than that of a flat-roofed extension, creating a more compact building envelope—which translates to less material needed for construction and less space to heat or cool.
This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins—one of which juts out from a natural ledge. Each of them fit two to four travelers or a family of five.
The large expanses of glass frame views that were perfectly planned. The seating areas are furnished with Scandia lounge chairs that were designed by Hans Brattrud in the 1950s and are now being produced by Fjordfiesta.
Stinessen placed each cabin carefully in order to ensure the best possible views and the right amount of privacy.
The cabins are made up of two layers of wood construction. The exterior layer is made of Larch wood with a custom glazing.
The studio's original wooden beams were left intact.
Bedroom with a view.
In keeping with Viks’s design, the living room remains on the second floor. A bright yellow artwork by Ken’ichiro Taniguchi complements the Bend Sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia. The Random pendant lights are by Bertjan Pot for Moooi, the Yo-Yo coffee table is by Emanuele Zenere, and the Maltino Rug is by Linie Design. The hardwood flooring is from the Admiration line by Mirage.
Last year, Tahquitz Plaza, a business complex Kaptur designed in the 1970s, underwent a restoration, which he helped oversee.
Its cast-concrete roof slabs evoke any number of desert sights—the fronds of a palm, the faces of stones, even the armored plates of an armadillo.
Donald Wexler arrived in Palm Springs in 1952 after a stint at Richard Neutra’s office in Los Angeles eager to build on a large scale with steel—hence the prefab Steel Development Houses.

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.