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dod 2011 flor 2

From the Show Floor: FLOR Tiles

While browsing the floor at Dwell on Design I had to stop in my tracks as I noticed this brightly colored rug. I would describe this rug as completely ridiculous, as its colors are garish and the patterns kind of make your eyes cross a little bit—and that's why I love it. As I approached the rug, it reminded me of a Missoni pattern, a pattern so few people can really pull off without looking like a rug themselves.
June 27, 2011
Marimekko Crate and Barrel shop

Marimekko at Crate & Barrel

This week, Marimekko launched its fourth and fifth shops at Crate & Barrel in Los Angeles and San Francisco. The two companies have collaborated for four decades so it makes sense that Marimekko is growing its North American retail presence by launching small shops within existing Crate & Barrel stores. The first shop-in-a-shop opened in SoHo last fall and since then, the company has launched another store in New York City and one in Chicago. On Thursday, we made our way to San Francisco's Union Square shopping district for this city's new Marimekko boutique.
May 27, 2011
Knoll Textiles 1945 2010 exhibit

Behind the Scenes: Knoll Textiles

Many a modern-design enthusiast can spot a Cesca side chair and say it was designed by Marcel Breuer. But, were it upholstered in Digit fabric, few could name the textile designer. (Answer: Suzanne Tick.) The new exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center titled Knoll Textiles, 1945-2010 features Knoll's original fabrics and textiles. The project began four years ago when Knoll approached Bard to do an exhibit. Soon thereafter, the curatorial team was created, comprising of Earl Martin, the associate curator at the Bard Graduate Center; Angela Völker, the curator emeritus of textiles at the MAK in Vienna; Susan Ward, an independent textile historian, and Paul Makovsky, the editorial director of Metropolis and a Florence Knoll expert. After years digging through existing archives and searching through former Knoll employees' attics to put together a comprehensive history and catalogue of KnollTextiles works, the exhibit is finally on display. Here, Madovsky takes us behind the scene and shares went into creating the show and shares stories about a number of the pieces on display.  
May 26, 2011
icff greypants 2

ICFF 2011: From the Show Floor

I'll admit, it's a little daunting stepping onto the show floor at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), held for a long May weekend every year at the Javits Convention Center in New York. There's a lot to see. But once you start wandering the aisles, uncovering design gems in the various booths is a blast. Here's round one of some of the things I saw that stuck with me.
May 18, 2011
wanted design spotlight

Wanted Design & NYC Design Week

Design Week is upon us in New York City. Designers, manufacturers, retailers, press, and the design loving general public will descend upon ICFF, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair this weekend. Outside of Javits, the convention hall hosting the show, many smaller exhibitions will spring up showcasing the work of emerging designers and less established brands. This years also marks the launch of Wanted Design, a new group show that places the products of many designers, and the conversation surrounding that work, into a more informal and social space.
May 13, 2011
Pendelton ParkBlanket Glacier

Pendleton's Park Blankets

National parks blankets made in Oregon by Pendleton Woolen Mills. Taken as a group, all the Pendleton products have a rather rustic effect, but individually we could see them fitting well into a modernist interior. And besides, why not wrap yourself up in a toasty national park when the weather gets cold? Best of all, they're made here in the USA. Check the slideshow of images and weigh in with your favorite.
May 3, 2011
peru t show 2011 ornaments

Peru Gift Show 2011

Greetings from Peru! I'm in Lima reporting from the showroom floors of the National Gift Show and Peru Moda, a fashion tradeshow, taking place April 27th to 30th. An estimated 5,000 people come to the Gift Show, now in its 13th year, to spy the handcrafted wares from the Andean highlands to the coastal cities and everywhere in between. The designs at the Gift Show were 100% Peruvian made down to the cotton fibers in the textiles, the alpaca wool woven into rugs, the woods carved into ornaments and trinkets, and the natural dyes that saturate everything with bright hues. In this slideshow, have a look at some of the objects that caught my eye. Most were traditional handicrafts—quite wonderful and a real treat to see—though my favorites were the contemprary upcycled designs of Nuna Lab and Geldres Design.
April 30, 2011
nathan vincent

Nathan Vincent's Locker Room

Artist Nathan Vincent, will be showing his new work at the Bellevue Arts Museum through June 26th. Vincent's work utilizes crochet and yarn to recreate many masculine objects in a new softer form. He's knitted taxidermy busts, urinals, guns, and tools.  The exhibit at Bellevue, "The Mysterious Content of Softness" features 11 national and international artists including Nathan Vincent and Lauren DiCioccio, all working with fiber in various techniques: knitting, weaving, and crochet.  Nathan's piece "Locker Room" is exactly what fans of the artist's work would expect. He's recreated a locker room entirely of yarn. Urinals, lockers, showers, and benches trade wood and metal for yarn and foam.   Photos by Steven Miller.
April 29, 2011
Buildings seen from our Penthouse terrace framed pops of color perfectly.

Colors of Iceland

I just returned from a four-day trip to Reykjavik and am still filled with excitement. Though the sky was grey for most of my time in Iceland, the visit was anything but dark and gloomy. The colors found all around the country, from the landscape to the cityscape to the clothes people wore, spanned the full spectrum. Buildings stretched across the city's skyline were dotted in teal, brick red, and mustard. Shops were filled with traditional knitwear in elaborate patterns and avant-garde pieces (think Bjork) in bold primary colors. With every coffee shop I popped my head into and every corner I turned, I was treated with flash upon flash of color statements and mixes. The architecture, the sweaters, the bikes, and the cars were painted in pop washes that complimented the bright, cheery moods of the Icelanders I met during my stay—and provided ample ammo to fight away the solemn skies and hail showers that plagued our trip.
April 26, 2011
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