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international beer day

International Beer Day

Today is International Beer Day (for those 21 and up, of course). In honor of the sudsy, hoppy, all-around-good delight, I dug up a couple of stories by Dwell Kitchen editor Miyoko Ohtake. The first is on Beer Craft by William Bostwick and Jessi Rymill, which features easy-to-read recipes on how to brew your own beer along with little bits of history on the drink. "Most books are written for making five gallons at a time, which is a lot" Bostwick says. "Our book focuses on small, one-gallon batches you can easily make on your stove." The other slideshow features vintage beer can designs from Beer: A Genuine Collection of Cans by John Russo. Whether you're into porters, stouts, pilsners, or ales, Happy International Beer Day and Happy Reading.
August 5, 2011
Marimekko iconic patterns

Marimekko's Iconic Patterns

It's hard not to adore (and lust after) Marimekko's fabrics. In the early 1950s, as Finland continued its slow ­recovery from World War II, textile designer Armi Ratia seized the opportunity to bring hope and optimism to the country—in the form of brightly colored and boldly patterned fabrics and clothing. From the remnants of her husband Viljo’s oilcloth company, the couple launched Marimekko in 1951. Less than a decade later, Jackie Kennedy graced a December 1960 cover of Sports Illustrated in a pink Marimekko dress, and the company took off, gaining renown for its bright, modern, fashion-forward textiles and clothing. Here we take a look at some of Marimekko's most iconic and favorite patterns. Be sure to watch our Process slideshow that shows how these textiles are made.
July 26, 2011
Egg Press Recipe Cards

Egg Press Recipe Cards

When you make a good meal, you want to share it (or at least keep the recipe on file for future dinner parties). Portland, Oregon-based letterpress company Egg Press has designed a new series of recipe cards to help you do so in an ever-so-elegant way.
July 22, 2011
Bostwick and Rymill began making beer in the spring of 2009 with the help of a homebrew kit. Their first batch, however, exploded—glass bottles and all—in their living room. After six months of troubleshooting and experimenting as hobbyists, they hunkered

Beer Craft Winners

In anticipation of the talk at Dwell on Design given by writer William Bostwick and designer Jessi Rymill of the excellent home brew/beer nerd book Beer Craft, we decided to give away a handful of copies. Loads of you wrote in to get your free book and we chose five winners from the entrants. Without further ado, here are our winners!
July 6, 2011
Design-inspired non-existant books to read by the beach

Beach Reading

Looking for a little light literature to while away the hours? We suggest a quartet of (fictional) titles for the design minded.
June 14, 2011
LACMA Monarch Bay

LACMA: California Design

As you might imagine, we inveterate modernists up here at Dwell are very, very excited for what will be one of the fall's best forays into modern design. On October 1, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is launching California Design 1930-1965: "Living in a Modern Way" which takes a good long look at how Californian design in the middle of the 20th century helped shape American material culture. I'm so thrilled to be talking with two of the shows curators Bobbye Tigerman and Wendy Kaplan at Dwell on Design on Friday June 24th to learn more about their research. But here's a sneak preview of 13 of the over 300 objects that will make up the show. Click on!
June 9, 2011
stedelijk posters 1

Stedelijk Museum Posters

Upon entering the bright white interior of Amsterdam's Stedelijk Museum, a series of floor-to-ceiling posters that once advertised past exhibitions greets visitors. It's a striking display that shows how the musem has promoted itself, and its shows, to the public since opening in 1895. Though there are a wide variety of designers and artists represented, those who helmed the Stedelijk as director—including Willem Sandberg from 1945 to 1962—and who were in charge of printed matter—like Wim Crouwel from 1963 to 1984—especially helped to create a strong visual identity for the cultural institution. The building itself is in the process of expanding with an expected grand opening date late next year, and until a climitization system is built in, only pieces that are not damaged easily are able to be shown. As such, these are all individual repreductions of the originals, which are in the permanent collection. Unfortunately, there are no prints for sale (although I'm sure they could make a killing), but I've snapped a few of my favorites here. Click on through to the slideshow for a taste of graphic design through the ages.
June 1, 2011
milton glaser portrait1

An Afternoon with Milton Glaser

Meeting design legend Milton Glaser was one of those classic moments that can only happen in New York City. I was having lunch with Alan Heller—the man behind the furniture manufacturing company Heller Inc.—when he scribbled Milton Glaser's number on a napkin, insisting I meet him. I called Milton the next day, and in turn, he invited me to his studio on East 32nd Street in Manhattan. I spent a few hours talking about history, both Milton's and New York's in equal measure, and parts of that special day are captured below.
May 26, 2011
Knoll Textiles 1945 2010 exhibit

Behind the Scenes: Knoll Textiles

Many a modern-design enthusiast can spot a Cesca side chair and say it was designed by Marcel Breuer. But, were it upholstered in Digit fabric, few could name the textile designer. (Answer: Suzanne Tick.) The new exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center titled Knoll Textiles, 1945-2010 features Knoll's original fabrics and textiles. The project began four years ago when Knoll approached Bard to do an exhibit. Soon thereafter, the curatorial team was created, comprising of Earl Martin, the associate curator at the Bard Graduate Center; Angela Völker, the curator emeritus of textiles at the MAK in Vienna; Susan Ward, an independent textile historian, and Paul Makovsky, the editorial director of Metropolis and a Florence Knoll expert. After years digging through existing archives and searching through former Knoll employees' attics to put together a comprehensive history and catalogue of KnollTextiles works, the exhibit is finally on display. Here, Madovsky takes us behind the scene and shares went into creating the show and shares stories about a number of the pieces on display.  
May 26, 2011
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