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Bostwick and Rymill began making beer in the spring of 2009 with the help of a homebrew kit. Their first batch, however, exploded—glass bottles and all—in their living room. After six months of troubleshooting and experimenting as hobbyists, they hunkered

Beer Craft: A Guide to Homebrew

William Bostwick and Jessi Rymill's new book Beer Craft: A Simple Guide to Making Great Beer is like Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything—just for homebrew hobbyists. In the book, the writer-designer duo outlines the basic steps of brewing then give you all the information you need to improvise and make each batch your own. Unlike the homebrew books that have come before, Beer Craft is designed for folks like Bostwick and Rymill: urban DIYers living in small, city apartments. "Most books are written for making five gallons at a time, which is a lot" Bostwick says. "Our book focuses on small, one-gallon batches you can easily make on your stove."
May 19, 2011
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Cityscapes: SF's Buildings

The San Francisco Chronicle boasts one of our nation's best architecture critics in John King. We happy citizens of the City by the Bay look out for his column in each Tuesday's paper, though his short addition to the Sunday edition—CItyscapes—is often just as rewarding. Heyday Books in Berkeley, California, has seen fit to print a pocket-sized edition of the best of those short pieces aptly titled Cityscapes: San Francisco and Its Buildings. Here we get 50 doses of the wit, wonder, and historical accumen King distills each week for the paper. The avid city-walker turns his attentions to iconic structures like the Transamerica Pyramid and neighborhood treasures such as Pacifc Primary School with equal aplomb. Call it a guidebook for locals, Cityscapes takes in the great breadth of San Francisco's built landscape and in it finds joy, beauty, and the great dynamic thrum that marks one of the world's most vital cities.  
May 12, 2011
Artists Handmade Houses

Artists' Handmade Houses

Ever wonder what an artist's home would look like if he or she were the mind behind it? This month, Abrams has published a stunning new coffee table book that peeks inside the abodes of 13 well-known, American craftspeople who built their homes themselves. Appropriately titled Artists' Handmade Houses, the book features beautiful images by Don Freeman and text by Michael Gotkin. Here we look at the homes of Russel Wright, Paolo Soleri, and George Nakashima.
May 5, 2011
Pulled by Mike Perry

Pulled by Mike Perry

Illustrator Mike Perry has long been a favorite at Dwell (just take a glance at his long list of contributions to the magazine). In his new book, Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing, Perry opens the page to other screen artists in this survey of more than 40 contemporary screen printers. Here, we take a peek inside 256-page coffee table topper, out next month.
April 26, 2011
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The Century of Modern Design

Of the myriad books on modernism—some more enlightening than others—The Century of Modern Design (Flammarion) will likely prove to be an important one. Culled from the Liliane and David M. Stewart collection (now part of the permanent collection at the Montreal Museum of Modern Art), the highlighted pieces are chronicled by decade, from 1930 through 2009. Designers range from the most revered to the little-known; some, where appropriate to the ongoing story and depending on their prolificness, appear more than once (the Eameses, Gaetano Pesce, Verner Panton). Edited by David A. Hanks, the book unfolds as a careful study of what we have come to call modern, exemplified here as a series of artful movements that are at times so innovative, they almost defy categorization.  
April 13, 2011
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"Sustainism": the New Modernism?

Honestly, when the book Sustainism is the New Modernism: A Cultural Manifesto for the Sustainist Era (D.A.P. / Distributed Art Publishers, New York) first crossed my desk, I wasn't sure how to react. The book's graphic aesthetic was a bit cluttered but the concept of the book was intriguing—the authors Michiel Schwarz and Joost Elffers propose that "Sustainism" (a term they've coined to describe a new cultural movement related to sustainability)—is the "new ecology of our networked world." "Sustainism in the twenty-first century will be what Modernism was in the last," the authors state. It's "the confluence of globalization, the web, climate change, localism, media democracy, open source, environmentalism, and more," and "a collective worldview that stresses the interdependence among cultural and natural environments." The rallying cry is "do more with less"—in contrast to Modernism's ubiquitous "less is more." Here, Schwarz and Elffers talk about Sustainism (the book, and the concept) and why they think it's the way forward.
April 4, 2011
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Reveal: Studio Gang Architects

At Dwell we've long been fans of the Chicago architecture firm Studio Gang Architects. Headed up by the nation's fastest rising female architect Jeanne Gang, the company is responsible not just for a number of very fine houses, but the new Aqua Tower in Chicago as well. On the heels of such success comes a book about Studio Gang's work titled Reveal: Studio Gang Architects. The book is out now from Princeton Architectural Press, and we've got a preview of what's inside. It's a mix of individual projects, models, and points of inspiration and offers a peek inside the process of a very exciting group of architects indeed. And be sure to dig the hot design by Elizabeth Azen.
March 31, 2011
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A Collection A Day

From delightfully mismatched buttons to colorful spools of thread to vintage typewriter ribbon, a variety of small, unexpected collections can be found in charming little tins. Thanks to artist/illustrator Lisa Congdon’s A Collection A Day blog project, we can now find her brand spankin’ new book of the same title oh-so-appropriately packaged in a tactile and highly covetable collector’s tin too. Designed and published in collaboration with UPPERCASE’s Janine Vangool, the book is chock full of “voracious collector” Congdon’s nostalgic finds—organized into 365 artful collections. As Congdon’s personal creative challenge for 2010, she curated her inspired finds (vintage luggage tags, pink erasers from yesteryear, old matchbooks, and even dolls’ hands) into related compositions and posted them on her blog everyday for a year. In celebration of the book launch, Congdon’s collections and original artwork are on view now through April 17th at the Curiosity Shoppe in San Francisco. But for a peak inside the book and into the highly imaginative mind of its creator, check out the slideshow.
March 28, 2011
Print Workshop: Hand-Printing Techniques and Truly Original Projects by Christine Schmidt

Print Workshop

A blank canvas can really get the blood pumping. For some, the sight is a beacon. For others, it can be intimidating. Christine Schmidt, founder and creative force behind San Francisco–based studio Yellow Owl Workshop, falls firmly in the former category, but Print Workshop, her first book, is designed to appeal to anyone who’s interested in giving printing a try.
March 27, 2011
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