Collection by Tiffany Chu

Venice Biennale: National Pavilions 1

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The concept of each country showing their best colors at the Venice Biennale began from 1895, in the same spirit of nationalism (or chauvinism) of the World's Fair. This year, proceeding straight ahead from the Giardini entrance, we take you on part one of a grand tour through the best of the national pavilions.

I was greeted by the conspicuous yellow signage of the Danish pavilion, and recognized the iconic language of the…
The product of collaborations among Ryue Nishizawa, Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, Koh Kitayama, and many others, the Japanese…
Atelier Bow-Wow's red house is known as a 'fourth-generation house,' which can be explored from the interior of the…
The British christened their pavilion 'Villa Frankenstein,' in reference to the work of John Ruskin, British Victorian…
This centerpiece is also being repurposed as a drawing studio. Built by carpenters Spazio Legno of Venice, it has…
Designed by architect Carlo Scarpa, whose works are ubiquitous in the Veneto region of Italy, the Venezuelan pavilion…
The Korean pavilion, 'RE.PLACE.ING: Documentary of Changing Metropolis Seoul,' boasts a wooden hanok, the traditional…
Canada's 'Hylozoic Ground' is a sensor-covered installation that almost mimicks a robot forest. It is a geotextile…
"And what is hylozoism?" I asked artist Philipp Beesley. "It is the ancient belief that all matter has life."
Titled 'Now and When,' the Australian pavilion was a black and fluorescent provocation into the future of the country's…
The Nordic pavilion was a joint effort between Sweden, Finland, and Norway. Its most popular feature was perhaps the…
Another aspect of this highly participatory pavilion was the 'At Work With' project—an experiment that invited 12…
The entrance of the American pavilion was trumpeted by the installation of MOS's Michael Meredith and Hilary Sample --…
The most innovative use of ordinary materials was surely the Hungarian pavilion, which took yellow school pencils and…
Designed by Marcel Ferencz and Andor Wesselenyi-Garay, Hungary's 'BorderLINE Architecture' was a foray into studying…
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