Mobile Trailers for Modern Roadtrippers

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These stunning travel trailers are made for those with an eye for modern design and another cast on the open road.

Modern home with Bedroom and Bed. The result, which will be available commercially in early 2015, is a teardrop-shaped caravan that can be towed behind a vehicle or parked in a backyard. Photo  of Mobile Trailers for Modern RoadtrippersView Photos

The jaunty boat-like shell of the Hütte Hut began with a case study undertaken by Brian and Katrina Manzo, a husband-and-wife team of industrial designers behind Sprouting Sprocket Studio. Katrina Manzo explains the pair’s 44-square-foot mobile prototype as “both reductive and luxurious.”

Modern home with Exterior and Camper Building Type. In early May, I headed down to Texas to report the October 2011 issue Off the Grid story about a sustainable home in Austin and then drove an hour out of the city to spend a night camping in a Cricket Trailer, a small, self-contained pop-up camper. Cricket Trailer founder and designer Garrett Finney drove from Houston, where he manufactures the trailers in a 5,000-square-foot factory, and met me at the 9E Ranch in Smithville. After orienting me to what he calls "a portable adventure living space," he took off and I spent the evening camping out and testing all the Cricket Trailer has to offer. Photo  of Mobile Trailers for Modern RoadtrippersView Photos

Combining his small-space expertise and backpacking background, former NASA designer Garrett Finney created the Cricket Trailer, a small, self-contained pop-up camper. It’s his response to bigger-is-better RV culture: “It’s not a house on wheels but a portable adventure living space,” he says.

Modern home with Exterior, Wood Siding Material, Camper Building Type, and Shed RoofLine. “When we first set out on this crazy adventure, we always pictured parking Woody in a place like this,” Brian says. “We honestly couldn’t have imagined it would be this spectacular.” Photo  of Mobile Trailers for Modern RoadtrippersView Photos

A young couple on the move built a small home that will go wherever life takes them. Brian and Joni Buzarde’s self-designed home sits on a customized chassis by PJ Trailers that’s just eight and a half feet wide. The 236-square-foot trailer is clad in cedar.

Modern home with Exterior, Curved RoofLine, Camper Building Type, Wood Siding Material, and Metal Siding Material. The Leaf House is a lightweight, mobile trailer that was carefully engineered to weigh less than 5,000 pounds. The designer, Laird Herbert, used a metal-mesh, open-joint rainscreen as the cladding on the front end, and spruce pine at the back. Photo  of Mobile Trailers for Modern RoadtrippersView Photos

The Leaf House is a lightweight, mobile trailer that was carefully engineered to weigh less than 5,000 pounds. The designer, Laird Herbert, used a metal-mesh, open-joint rainscreen as the cladding on the front end, and spruce pine at the back.

The ESCAPE Traveler stands out from other trailers by blending in. Designed to resemble a prairie cabin, its cedar lap siding makes it a strong visual fit for scenic destinations. Photo  of Mobile Trailers for Modern Roadtrippers modern homeView Photos

Capacious enough to fit full-size appliances and a party of six, the 269-square-foot ESCAPE Traveler redefines roughing it. Designed to resemble a prairie cabin, its cedar lap siding makes it a strong visual fit for scenic destinations.

Modern home with Exterior, Wood Siding Material, and Camper Building Type. +Farm is based in upstate New York, where land can be cheap but new housing prohibitively expensive: when a resident breaks ground on a waterfront site, their taxes can dramatically increase. What if new housing didn't need to technically break ground? "Our thought," says +Farm Director William Haskas, was "let's discuss ideas for a new type of dwelling....one that could potential help the people that actually live in the area." Photo  of Mobile Trailers for Modern RoadtrippersView Photos

+FARM's purpose is simple in theory, complex in excution: use a short summer project to immerse students and young professionals in the design and construction process. Since 2011, the program—currently an educational institute, soon to be a non-profit—has built a number of small shelters and installations across upstate New York. Their most recent project is an economical mobile dwelling with off-the-grid capabilities.