Chilmark Guest House

Massachusetts
Location
  • Massachusetts
  • Type
  • Modern
  • This project page was created by community member Charles Rose Architects

    This compact two-bedroom house occupies a sunny patch on a steep slope and is surrounded by native vegetation. It links to the main house by a path of rustic stones, and while it has some views of its larger neighbor, enjoys near-total privacy. It shares with the main house the same set of impulses: a continual connection with nature and a roof deck and other outdoor places to enjoy nature, including a roomy outdoor shower—angled mahogany slats built around a patinated steel frame. Inside are two bedrooms at opposite ends of the house, each with their own bathroom. The communal area is in the center of the guesthouse; it has a sitting area with three banquettes that convert to beds; a curtain by the kitchenette can be drawn for privacy, turning this into an extra bedroom for children. Interior walls are teak, cork and mahogany, giving the house the feel of a classic boat. The exterior is meticulously detailed, with copper cladding.

    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Photo Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects
    Posted By
    Charles Rose Architects
    @charlesrosearch
    Charles Rose (b. 1960 New York City) is an American architect whose designs are informed by the landscape and distinct characteristics of a building site—whether in rugged coastal settings or dense urban neighborhoods. Rose earned degrees in architecture at Princeton University and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, studying under such high-profile practitioners as Michael Graves and Rafael Moneo. After Harvard, Rose worked with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, an experience that influenced his design philosophy of architecture that “sees the site.” He established his practice in Boston in 1989 and in two decades completed more than 50 buildings.
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