Collection by Byron Johnson

Cabin

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When not in use as the headboard, the large redwood slab folds down to become a desk.
The bed was designed to hang from the ceiling and can be hoisted up and pulled down as needed.
The 1950s desk in the office is from the original house; the chair is by Aksel, a Norwegian furniture company.
Sited parallel to each other, the two autonomous bedroom cabins frame perspectival views of the surrounding landscape.
The west side is clad with six shutters made of horizontal, western red cedar slats that can be opened or closed with a...
The house may appear conventional at a glance, but a closer look shows how Oostenbruggen has pushed the boundaries of...
The living room's double height makes the space seem larger that its actual size.
When they are eventually integrated into the parks, the cabins are meant to stand in groups of ten to 15.
The house is divided into three sections connected by a series of outdoor galleries.
The exterior materials reflect the surrounding environment.
A polychrome facade made of salvaged, 100-year-old barnwood gives this small, lofted cottage space its unique character.
The house's ceiling was hewn from Douglas fir, which gives off a warm glow.
Large sliding glass doors allow daylight to fill the living room.
Two smaller, adjacent structures house autonomous bedrooms, each equipped with a full bathroom.
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