A Kitchen for the Boys

San Francisco, California
Location
  • San Francisco, California
  • This project page was created by community member Benjamin Farrell

    Originally this house was a rabbit warren of tiny rooms, half of which were hardly being used. The boys who lived here had more or less learned to avoid the isolated rooms tucked out in the corners and lived primarily in the social, open center of the house. We adapted the house by blowing out all the walls on the upper floor to get a single, multi-use room better suited for their lifestyle of enjoying friends and family. Five jumbo skylights overhead fill the room with light.

    Inside the newly created Garden Room

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell

    Large folding doors open up a new Garden room to the rear yard deck.

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell

    A narrow material palette keeps these large rooms from feeling too busy.

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell

    Tall ceiling and tall cabinets anchor this large multi-purpose room.

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell

    A long counter height island separates guests from kitchen.

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell

    Jumbo skylights open up the room to the sky and also hide built in speakers (can you see em?)

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell

    Light from a single south facing window adds warmth all day long.

    Photo Courtesy of Benjamin Farrell
    Posted By
    Benjamin Farrell
    @farrellarchitecture
    Ben Farrell, owner and principal architect, is a graduate of Syracuse University but attributes most of his formative experiences to time spent in Florence, Italy and Copenhagen, Denmark. His curiosity with architecture came at a young age in Copenhagen by spray painting graffiti on the drab and boring ends of buildings that seemed otherwise forgotten. He legitimized this passion for unauthorized aesthetic improvement with an architectural education, some of which was spent studying the classics in the architecturally fecund areas of Tuscany. These contrasting experiences spawned an equally contentious philosophy that continues to juxtapose the respect of classical order with a modernity that says "nothing is sacred", improvement happens everywhere and sometimes the rules are just wrong. He resides in Southern Marin with a studio in Sausalito.
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