Collection by Diana Budds

A Five-Act History of Urbanism in Barcelona

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Labyrinthine alleys, majestic avenues, meandering parks, and pristine beaches—this is the urban fabric of modern Barcelona, a city 2,500 years in the making. We've traipsed the Catalonian capital's streets this past week and to provide orientation and context to the photos shared via our Instagram feed, here's a brief history of the city divided into five acts.

Labyrinthine alleys, majestic avenues, meandering parks, and pristine beaches—this is the urban fabric of modern...
The oldest part of the Barcelona is known as the "Ciutat Vella," (shown here) and is divided into smaller neighborhoods.
Act 2: ExtensionIn 1800s, the compact city was busting at its seams with hundreds of thousands of residents packed into...
Civil engineer Ildefons Cerda designed a plan for the "Eixample," Catalan for "extension." The government approved his...
Casa Mila, architect Antoni Gaudi's residnetial project completed in 1912, is located in the Eixample.
Act 3: ParksOne of the city's—and the world's—most lauded public spaces is the Park Güell.
Construction began in 1900 and continued until 1914 when the outbreak of WWI stalled further construction.
Act 4: TransportationBarcelona built its first Metro line in 1924.
Act 5: Waterfront RehabilitationThe 1992 Olympics spurred the most-recent changes to the overall urban fabric, namely...
Here's one of the city's popular beaches.
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