The Making-of Balloon Bowls

By Jaime Gillin / Published by Dwell
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A trip to Brussels earlier this year included an afternoon visit to Studio With a View, a collective workshop shared by an architect, two photographers, and five designers. While there, I was able to watch a handful of the designers at work, including Raphael Charles, who was photographing a new version of his Magnetic Coffee Table, and Julien Carretero (below), who was experimenting with metal forms to create a new kind of lamp.
De Ceulaer's Mutation sofa is made of foam spheres coated with a velvet-like rubber powder.

De Ceulaer's Mutation sofa is made of foam spheres coated with a velvet-like rubber powder.

I spent most of my time talking with designer Maarten De Ceulaer, whose cellular-inspired Mutation Series of furniture had recently made a splash during Milan Design Week. De Ceulaer showed me around his workspace and, when I expressed interest in his Balloon Bowls—colorful synthetic plaster bowls cast inside inflated balloons—he showed me the following video, which is well worth a watch... one of the best and clearest making-of videos I've seen, even while being dialogue-free .

 

Watching the behind-the-scenes process gave me new admiration for the colorful bowls, which are intrigiung even without knowing all the hands-on work that goes into making them.

A colorful crop of Balloon Bowls, each made from dyed synthetic plaster cast within a balloon.

A colorful crop of Balloon Bowls, each made from dyed synthetic plaster cast within a balloon.

A closer look at a finished Balloon Bowl.

A closer look at a finished Balloon Bowl.

 

If you like these kinds of making-of videos, take a peek at the website for the Brussels gallery Victor Hunt; their "Tales of the Hunt" video series (which includes the Ceulaer video above) focuses on a different artist or designer each episode.

Jaime Gillin

@jaimegillin

When not writing, editing, or combing design magazines and blogs for inspiration, Jaime Gillin is experimenting with new recipes, traveling as much as possible, and tackling minor home-improvement projects that inevitably turn out to be more complex than anticipated.

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