The building takes advantage of passive heating and cooling, thanks to Blee and Halligan's strategic design to capture the most sunlight in the winter and provide the most shade in the summer. The above-ground glass facade faces east and draws in the daylight, but when the sun proves too strong, whoever is staying in the structure can close the internal shutters to beat the heat.  Photo 3 of 6 in A Couple Restores a Seemingly Hopeless Mill in France
The cabin is partially underground, so the designers drew on the sun via skylights and strategically placed windows to light and heat the structure.  Photo 5 of 6 in A Couple Restores a Seemingly Hopeless Mill in France
Renovating the old mill was a family effort, and Blee called on his sister Kate, a textile designer based in London, to lend a helping hand with the tile work. Kate's repertoire also extends to building installations, including a ceramic wall in the City and Islington Center for Lifelong Learning in North London. "She had several boxes left over," Blee recalls, "which meant another opportunity to use something that was lying around." The tiles, with finishes ranging from heavy glazes to matte coats, offered textural variety, which brother and sister used to "play around with the idea of reflection from the roof light." Tagged: Bath Room, Wall Mount Sink, and Ceramic Tile Wall.  Photo 4 of 6 in A Couple Restores a Seemingly Hopeless Mill in France
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