Despite the cast-on-site concrete dividers, there's still an airy sense of space; the dividers support, instead of overwhelm. This approach came from the architects' constant sense of experimentation and playfulness, a deliberate approach that helped them find new ways to use recycled and salvaged materials.  Photo 6 of 9 in Industrial Pied-à-Terre in Italy
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A fading ceiling was preserved in the bedroom. Clear resin was applied to the blue and green pigments to freeze and preserve the aging wall.  Photo 8 of 9 in Industrial Pied-à-Terre in Italy
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While the aesthetic was meant to convey a blank slate, historical touches abound inside. Pipes were restored from Gian Nicola Ricci's father's plumbing company, industrial lights from an old second-hand store found a new life, and outside of a few IKEA pieces, the furniture was all custom-built, mostly from salvaged material.  Photo 7 of 9 in Industrial Pied-à-Terre in Italy
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