Gesner believes that “Surfing, the environment, and architecture go hand-in-hand. We should take cues from the environment and the natural elements.” Because of this theory, Gesner was known for sitting on sites for hours in order to get the feeling of these elements before diving into the design.  Photo 6 of 9 in Iconic Perspectives: Harry Gesner’s Sandcastle
The Wave House sits directly next to the Sandcastle on the sands of Malibu. When Gesner created it in 1957, the design had originally been born when he was surfing and drew the shape of the house on his surfboard with a piece of grease pencil, and would transfer it to a drawing pad and vellum when he returned to the sand. He found inspiration in the way a giant wave embraces you—and how you become a part of it. The roof is lined with copper shingles layered in a way that gives the impression of fish scales.  Photo 8 of 9 in Iconic Perspectives: Harry Gesner’s Sandcastle
Gesner never threw away any piece of paper he drew on. All of these specimens had been sitting in cardboard boxes underneath the house until his assistant helped him archive it all from the last 70 years.  Photo 7 of 9 in Iconic Perspectives: Harry Gesner’s Sandcastle
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