Perched on a piano towards the front of the house is a wooden model that was developed by Cal Poly Pomona students. It illustrates the original VDL residence design before it was destroyed in the 1963 fire. The piano it sits on belonged to Neutra’s wife Dione where she would regularly play and sing. Neutra had cut off the original legs and replaced them with chromed tubular legs for a more modern look.  Photo 5 of 11 in Iconic Perspectives: Richard Neutra's VDL Studio & Residences
When Neutra and Dion were building VDL II, they developed a handful of forward-thinking technologies that considered how to work with the Southern California climate with a mind for sustainability. Pioneered by Neutra in 1944 and implemented into the 1960s renovation, automated vertical louvers facing west are controlled by a sensor on the roof that opens and closes them based on how sunny it is. Seen at the far right side of this photo, they also add a sculptural element to the facade.  Photo 7 of 11 in Iconic Perspectives: Richard Neutra's VDL Studio & Residences
Because the residence endured through multiple lives, it portrays three different stages of Neutra’s work, each of which is reflected through characteristic details. It’s a truly special experience to be able to see the evolution of an architect’s work illustrated throughout a living masterpiece.  Photo 6 of 11 in Iconic Perspectives: Richard Neutra's VDL Studio & Residences
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