Get the Look in This Tribeca Loft

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By Matthew Keeshin / Published by Dwell
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A Manhattan loft brings in a lot of natural light and indulges in an array of wood details, from furniture to flooring. Here's how the architects made it happen.

FLOORING
The original fir joists were revealed during the renovation while the floors are white oak from LV Wood. 

DINING  
The dining area is furnished with a live-edge dining table by Uhuru. Wooden Square Guest chairs and a Simple Bench by BDDW surround the table. Accross from the dining area is a credenza by BDDW.  

LIGHT

Hanging above the dining room is the Highwire Tandem chandelier by Apparatus. 

LIVING

Mark Berryman found a converted 1864 factory building he loved on the western edge of Manhattan’s Tribeca—where he can run along the edge of the Hudson River with his chocolate Lab, Leji, or easily escape to Long Island for a surf trip. He was living in the building when a smaller yet more desirable apartment with sweeping river views became available there in 2013. He bought it that October, even though interior walls awkwardly sliced up the 1,800-square-foot space. Planning a complete gut renovation, Berryman interviewed four design firms before hiring Brooklyn-based Workstead.<br><br>Workstead came back with a plan that included taking down many of the interior partitions, tearing out the drywall ceiling to expose the building’s hefty original fir joists, and painting the existing pipes black. "We wanted to uncover things to celebrate them," says Workstead partner Robert Highsmith. "We wanted to create an interior that connects with the building’s sense of place."

Mark Berryman found a converted 1864 factory building he loved on the western edge of Manhattan’s Tribeca—where he can run along the edge of the Hudson River with his chocolate Lab, Leji, or easily escape to Long Island for a surf trip. He was living in the building when a smaller yet more desirable apartment with sweeping river views became available there in 2013. He bought it that October, even though interior walls awkwardly sliced up the 1,800-square-foot space. Planning a complete gut renovation, Berryman interviewed four design firms before hiring Brooklyn-based Workstead.

Workstead came back with a plan that included taking down many of the interior partitions, tearing out the drywall ceiling to expose the building’s hefty original fir joists, and painting the existing pipes black. "We wanted to uncover things to celebrate them," says Workstead partner Robert Highsmith. "We wanted to create an interior that connects with the building’s sense of place."

Dinamarquesa Armchairs by Jorge Zalszupin from Espasso and a Box Sofa by Autoban for De La Espada surround a Dante Table by Asher Israelow in the living area.