TWA Flight Center -- New York, New York (1962)

Dubbed the “Grand Central of the Jet Age” by critic Robert A.M. Stern, Saarinen’s curvaceous terminal was a paean to the romance of flight. The sloped concrete roof recalls two flapping wings, while contours constantly bend and flow into each, creating a fluid collection of terminals, staircases and forms. “We wanted passengers passing through the building to experience a fully-designed environment, in which each part arises from another and everything belongs to the same formal world," said Saarinen. After being shuttered for years, the space is set to be turned into a luxury hotel. Photo courtesy Wikipedia.  Photo 7 of 10 in Design Icon: Architect Eero Saarinen
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Miller House -- Columbus, Indiana (1957) 

One of Saarinen’s few single-family homes, built for industrialist J. Irwin Miller and his wife Xenia, the Miller House features modern accents such as a cylindrical fireplace and is built around a central space with a conversation pit, a courtyard of sorts inside the building. Photo courtesy Gabriel Jorby, Creative Commons.  Photo 9 of 10 in Design Icon: Architect Eero Saarinen
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Milwaukee War Memorial -- Milwaukee Wisconsin (1959)

A project Saarinen picked up from his father, who passed away before completing, the memorial is built around a floating cruciform with cantilevered portions, referencing Le Corbusier’s concepts of lifting the building off the ground and eliminating load-bearing walls.  This Lakefront building also boasts a 1.4-million piece mosaic commemorating the dates of WWII and the Korean War. Photo courtesy Peter Alfred Hess, Creative Commons.  Photo 8 of 10 in Design Icon: Architect Eero Saarinen
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