Gateway Arch -- St. Louis, Missouri (1965)

"Relevant, beautiful, perhaps inspired would be the right word" was how one judge described Saarinen’s winning submission in 1948 to build the centerpiece of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, the St. Louis Arch. Standing as the nation’s tallest man-made monument, the 630-foot-high curve of concrete and stainless steel stands as a focal point of the St. Louis riverfront and poignant symbol of national confidence and innovation. Both Eero and his father submitted designs, and a mix-up meant the family temporarily thought the elder Eliel had won. Photo courtesy Wikipedia.  Photo 4 of 10 in Design Icon: Architect Eero Saarinen
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Ingalls Rink at Yale University -- New Haven, Connecticut (1958)

Known as the “Yale Whale,” this iconic rink gets its double backbone design from a reinforced concrete arch, which supports a cable net that in turn supports the timber roof. The graceful curve, which supposedly represents the grace of players skating on the ice, and excellent sight lines has made the stadium a favorite, and earned it a place in AIA’s America’s Favorite Architecture list. Photo courtesy  joevare, Creative Commons.  Photo 6 of 10 in Design Icon: Architect Eero Saarinen
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John Deere Headquarters -- Moline, Illinois (1964)

This acclaimed headquarters for the tractor manufacturer pioneered the use of weathering steel, which turned a distinctive, soil-like color (due to iron oxide) if left untreated. Company President William Hewitt was being pressured to move the company to the coast, but resisted, with the caveat that the new building represent the company and its employees. Saarinen delivered with what he called “a steel building that was really a steel building,” a strong, dark structure that was more metal than glass.  Photo 5 of 10 in Design Icon: Architect Eero Saarinen
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